Falling ice capades: Extell sued over icicles at Central Park Tower

first_imgShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Full Name* “While the city thrives on new development, building owners and contractors have an obligation to ensure their construction projects do not present a danger to the public,” the plaintiff’s lawyers, Pardalis & Nohavicka, said in a statement. “Despite previous incidents, warnings and shutdowns, the defendants did not take the necessary steps to ensure public safety.”Central Park Tower is the city’s tallest residential building, and topped out at its full 1,550-foot height in 2019. It’s also projected to be the most expensive condo in the city, with a $4 billion sellout — though it’s faced the same pressures as other real estate projects because of the pandemic and the softening luxury market.The Billionaires’ Row tower was issued two violations from the Department of Building last December over ice falling from the construction site and construction equipment. One reads, “Police on site. Street closed. No injuries.”Central Park Tower has a history of safety issues that have resulted in litigation. In 2018, a sheet of glass weighing 2,300 pounds fell from the building, killing a security worker. Lendlease settled the lawsuit brought by the worker’s family for $1.25 million, although it continues to fight financial penalties.In January of this year, the construction firm sued the DOB and the Office of Administration Trials and Hearings over a $25,000 fine imposed following the accident.Orion Jones TagsBillionaires RowExtell DevelopmentNYC Luxury MarketReal Estate Lawsuits Extell Development’s Gary Barnett and Central Park Tower (Building photo via Central Park Tower)First, a dying luxury market. Then a pandemic. And now, a dispute over falling icicles.Falling icicles?That’s according to a lawsuit filed by a bike rental company against Extell Development and its contractors, including Lendlease, over a 2019 incident at Central Park Tower, the developer’s supertall skyscraper at 217 West 57th Street.The company, Central Park Bike Tours, claims it lost six days of business and revenue due to the falling ice, and is seeking at least $150,000, plus fees, in restitution.“Negligent ice maintenance and removal related to the project at the Central Park Tower caused a shutdown of West 58th Street and several adjoining streets,” the plaintiff says in a lawsuit filed Thursday in New York State Supreme Court. “Current and potential customers were either fearful of or not permitted to walk toward [our] store because their lives were in danger.”ADVERTISEMENTExtell did not respond to a request for comment.Read moreExtell brings on Corcoran Sunshine to help market Central Park TowerTorgalkar out as CEO of Extell: sourcesLendlease disputes city’s penalty in 2018 death at Central Park Towercenter_img Message* Email Address* Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

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Controls on dissolved and particulate iron distribution in surface waters of the Western Antarctic Peninsula shelf

first_imgThe Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) displays high but variable productivity and is also undergoing rapid change. Long-term studies of phytoplankton communities and primary production have suggested transient limitation by the micronutrient iron (Fe), but to date no data have been available to test this hypothesis. Here, we present the first spatially extensive, multi-year measurements of dissolved and particulate trace metals in surface waters to investigate the key sources and sinks of Fe in the central WAP shelf. Surface samples of dissolved and particulate metals were collected throughout the 700 × 200 km grid of the Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research program in three consecutive austral summers (2010 − 2012). Iron concentrations varied widely. Both dissolved and particulate Fe were high in coastal waters (up to 8 nmol kg− 1 and 42 nmol kg− 1, respectively). In contrast, very low Fe concentrations (< 0.1 nmol kg− 1) were widespread in mid- to outer-shelf surface waters, especially in the northern half of the sampling grid, suggesting possible Fe limitation of primary production on the shelf. Sea ice and dust inputs of Fe were minor, although their relative importance increased with distance from shore due to the larger near-shore sources. Sedimentary inputs were inferred from manganese distributions; these were more significant in the northern portion of the grid, and showed interannual variation in intensity. Overall, the interannual distribution of Fe was most closely correlated to that of meteoric water (glacial melt and precipitation). Although the Fe concentrations and relative contributions of dissolved and particulate Fe attributed to meltwater were variable throughout the sampling region, increasing glacial meltwater flux can be expected to increase the delivery of Fe to surface waters of the coastal WAP in the future.last_img read more

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Sainsbury wins Cambridge Chancellorship

first_imgCambridge University has elected Lord Sainsbury as its new chancellor in the first real contest for the post since 1847. The millionaire philanthropist succeeds the Duke of Edinburgh who held the title for 34 years.While the role is largely ceremonial, the recent choice was more contentious than usual after a number of candidates, including a popular local shopkeeper, were put forward.Sainsbury is a Cambridge graduate and has donated millions of pounds towards science facilities at the university. He worked for the family business Sainsbury’s, rising to chairman, and previously served as government minister for science – a position he held under Tony Blair’s premiership.The other contenders for the prestigious title were the lawyer Michael Mansfield QC, actor Brian Blessed and Abdul Arain, owner of Mill Road’s Al-Amin store. While Sainsbury gained over half of the vote, many students backed Arain’s campaign in a demonstration of solidarity with small shop owners.Campaigning spread to the social networking site Twitter, with a plea that academics cast a vote for ‘Anybody but Sainsbury’. The Single Transferable Vote system used by the university means that a candidate requires a majority of first-preference votes to be sure of victory.Speaking about his victory, Sainsbury commented, ‘I am pleased and honoured to have been elected as the next chancellor of Cambridge University and would like to thank all those whohave supported me, and the other candidates who have made this such a friendly election.’Some students were unsurprisingly disappointed in that respect. Matthew Johnson, chairman of the Cambridge University Conservative Association said Sainsbury’s political background was “a drawback for my association”, though he added that he felt the new chancellor was a “charitable, intelligent and successful gentleman”. There was some disappointment with the level of turnout for the election. While the University had predicted that 8000 votes would be cast, less than 6000 made it into the ballot box.last_img read more

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O.C. Councilman Makes Pre-Super Bowl Pilgrimage to “Arrowhead East”

first_imgBy TIM KELLYAs a longtime Kansas City Chiefs fan hoping for his team’s first Super Bowl win in 50 years, Bob Barr knew all about Big Charlie’s Saloon in South Philadelphia.Barr, an Ocean City councilman representing the Fourth Ward, hadn’t personally visited the corner bar, which is nationally known as “Arrowhead East” in honor of the Chiefs stadium.All that changed Thursday night when Barr and Niners superfan Kelli Giblin of Upper Township made the 66-mile trek from the city of Manco and Manco to the city of soft pretzels and cheesesteaks to see the Big Charlie’s mystique first-hand.Along for the festivities was Bryan Leatherwood of Ocean City, Barr’s assistant and a friend of Bob and Kelli since childhood, who bravely showed up wearing a Dallas Cowboys jersey.“It was better than I imagined,” Barr said of the visit. “You could feel the passion of the people there and how much everyone cares about the Chiefs. It reminded me of, well, me!”A reporter recently suggested Barr should head to Big Charlie’s after the Divisional round of the playoffs. Kansas City had beaten the Houston Texans following the Tennessee Titans’ stunning upset of the Baltimore Ravens, an outcome most observers felt cleared the Super Bowl LIV path for the Chiefs.“Not yet!” Barr said then, wanting to avoid jinxing anything by looking ahead. “Talk to me after the Conference championship game. If the Chiefs are going to the Super Bowl, then I’ll be interested.”Once the Chiefs punched their ticket to the big game and Frisco earned the NFC berth by dominating the Minnesota Vikings, Barr said he was ready.The walls of Big Charlie’s are filled with Kansas City Chiefs memorabilia. (Photo credit: Temple News)A Chiefs island in a sea of Eagles territory, Big Charlie’s Saloon resembles a typical neighborhood taproom at 11th and McKean in the heart of South Philly – except for the museum-quality Chiefs shrine inside and the port-a-johns set up on McKean to accommodate Sunday’s expected crush of fans and the local and national media.Barr wanted no part of that scene and laughingly said, “I might have to watch the game by myself” due to his emotional investment and desire not to be distracted. However, a pre-game trip was in order, he agreed.An OCNJDaily.com editor suggested a Niners fan should be invited as well, if Barr knew one.Did he ever. Giblin is an Eagles fan by birth and spent her first seven years growing up in Southwest Philly.She swapped out her fandom in 2017 when her brother, former Ocean City High School football player Joe Cosgrove, was hired as one of the Niners video operations assistants. In his role with the Niners, Cosgrove helps with all team video operations and game analysis, and manages the team’s partnerships with several outside video and software companies.The connection enabled Kelli to meet many of the Niners team members and coaches, and to attend a number of games. She and her boyfriend altered a long-planned trip to Disney World upon finding out Frisco would be headed to Miami for pro football’s biggest showcase.“We were booked to leave on February 4,” Giblin said. “As soon as we knew the 49ers made the Super Bowl, I changed my flight and now we’re looking at a Super Bowl weekend and then Disney. It will be a 12-day trip in all.”Then she tossed out a barb toward Barr: “When (49ers quarterback) Jimmy Garoppolo takes the MVP and says, ‘I’m going to Disney World,’ we’ll be there waiting for him.”“Did you get the spelling on her last name?” Barr shot back. “It’s Kelli Go-Chiefs.”Despite being in enemy territory, Niners fan Kelli Giblin of Upper Township enjoys visiting Big Charlie’s.Ironically, Barr’s origins as a Chiefs supporter began after years of cheering for, of all teams, the 49ers.“When I was a little kid, I liked to go against my Dad who was a big Eagles fan,” he recalled.After watching Niners legend Joe Montana carve up the Eagles in 1989 with five touchdown passes, he adopted San Francisco as his team. But when Montana was traded to the Chiefs in 1993, Barr traded his allegiance to Kansas City and stuck with them ever since.Barr and Giblin’s good-natured sparring continued for much of the drive, until wheel man Leatherwood came upon Big Charlie’s and amazingly grabbed a parking spot less than a block away.There, the group was met by Michael Puggi, a neighborhood resident and longtime friend and helper of Big Charlie’s owner Paul Staico. He noticed Barr’s red Chiefs sweatshirt.“Welcome to Big Cholly’s. Where yiz from?” a grinning Puggi said in true South Philly fashion.He immediately rolled out the red carpet and pointed out some of the more memorable pieces of Chiefs memorabilia. Then he saw Giblin’s knit 49ers hat.“You’re going to have to turn that hat around,” he said, making it a condition for her to stay.“I respect that,” she replied.Kelli Giblin, Bob Barr and Bryan Leatherwood make the trip from Ocean City to South Philly’s destination for Kansas City Chiefs fans.The walls of the place are virtually covered with Chiefs posters, team photos and artwork. There’s a cigar store Indian painted in Chiefs colors, and a game-worn helmet from the team’s 1960s origins in the old American Football League as the Dallas Texans.The bar’s back room contained, among other things, a signed plaque featuring the autographs of Super Bowl I starting quarterbacks Bart Starr (Packers) and the Chiefs Len Dawson, and a framed and autographed Mahomes rookie jersey.That was just for openers. Puggi handed Barr the actual Emmy Award statuette presented to NFL Films for its feature on Big Charlie’s, as well as a championship ring from Super Bowl IV. He proudly pointed out a neon sign designating the bar as Arrowhead East.Puggi explained how a former “shot and a beer” bar in South Philly evolved into the national go-to meeting place for Chiefs fans outside of Kansas City.In 1970, owner “Big Charlie” Staico was “a little bit of a (Chiefs) fan,” who made a rather large bet on Kansas City.“My Dad told me if he won the bet, there could be a new bike in it for me,” Paul Staico noted in the NFL Films video. “That’s the way it worked out and I got a new bike. Ever since then I’ve been loyal to the Chiefs and taken it to a new level.”Following Big Charlie’s passing, Paul took over the bar in 1983 and began decorating it with Chiefs memorabilia. Simultaneously, he installed satellite TV to allow patrons to watch the Kansas City games that weren’t nationally televised. A small cult following of neighborhood Chiefs fans developed and kept getting bigger and bigger.“It’s just a comfortable place where everyone is welcome, as long as you are a Chiefs fan,” said a patron who declined to give his full name. “We even let Eagles fans in the front room sometimes. Chiefs fans are only allowed in the back.”Michael Puggi displays the Emmy Award statuette NFL Films gave to the tavern owners for a documentary about Big Charlie’sOver the years, the bar has gained notoriety among Chiefs fans. On the night Barr visited, so did two Kansas City men who happened to be Philly on business.“We’re here and the Chiefs are in the Super Bowl. We had to come check it out,” one said. “This place is incredible.”Philadelphia and the Chiefs have long been associated in the football universe. Former Eagles head coach Andy Reid, who reached the 2004 Super Bowl but lost to the Patriots, will be trying to seal the deal with the Chiefs this time.He’s the second ex-Eagles boss to take the helm of Kansas City, following Dick Vermeil’s two-year run. Former Eagles executive Carl Peterson was a longtime Chiefs general manager, and current Kansas City all-pro tight end Travis Kelce is the sibling of all-pro Eagles center Jason Kelce.Puggi pointed out that Vermeil and his coaching staff once visited the bar, as did another former KC boss, Marty Schottenheimer. An autographed Chiefs helmet donated by Reid occupies a place of honor above the bar.A bar patron identified as “Bill” poses with one of the Indian statues adorning the interior of Big Charlie’s.Puggi said a shoulder-to-shoulder crowd is expected on Sunday, and that a small parking lot and a block outside will be temporarily transformed into an outdoor beer garden, where loyalists will ignore the February chill and bask in the warmth of their common bond as Chiefs fans.“We’re Philly all the way for the Phillies, Sixers and Flyers,” he said. “And we’re every bit as passionate as Eagles fans in the exact same way. It’s just that our passion is for the Chiefs.”The South Philly Chiefs fans’ thirst for a Lombardi trophy seems eerily similar to Eagles fans’ 57-year drought between NFL championships.“I really don’t know how I’ll feel when we finally win,” Puggi said, his eyes welling up. “A lot of our old-timers aren’t with us anymore.”Barr absorbed it all with wide-eyed amazement. Even Kelli conceded, “This place is really, really cool. I might be for the Niners, but I’m happy I came here.”After taking it all in, chatting up the regulars and fellow tourists and taking lots of pictures, it was time to head back to Ocean City.“I’ll come back here again sometime,” Barr promised.“It would be fun to come back after we win,” he added, smiling at Kelli. “Sometime after the parade.”The corner of 11th and McKean streets in South Philadelphia is ground zero for Philadelphia area and displaced Chiefs fans. (Photo courtesy of Twitter) Ocean City Councilman Bob Barr, right, enjoys the “Chiefs Kingdom” of Big Charlie’s Saloon along with Michael Puggi, a staff member of the tavern.last_img read more

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Sweet charity

first_imgMost of us would like to make a small difference to the planet or leave the world a little bit better off than we found it.Few of us dreamt, some years ago, that we might be able to do just that. Or that we could relieve some of the worst poverty, help build schools and provide fresh water where there was none. Nor did we guess that we could make that big a difference for just a small amount – but we can.Fairtrade ingredients and Fairtrade products are proving a big success because the quality is good (or they do not make it to market) and the prices are, well, fair.All the supermarkets now stock Fairtrade products. But it was back in 2003 that Napier Brown, which supplies sugar and other ingredients to the baking industry, decided to make it their mission to source Fairtrade sugar and even Fairtrade organic sugar. Their commercial and technical teams have now been sourcing and supplying these sugars from Africa and South America for the last five years with the help of local sugar companies.Peter Hough, development director at Napier Brown, has recently travelled to find out the differences it is making to communities who grow sugar cane in Malawi and Zambia, many of whom live off their own smallholdings. That difference could mean survival.On his latest trip, he was driven from Zambia to Mazambuka, where he saw the face of the Zambian president on almost every wall. It looked familiar. It was the man who had sat next to him on the plane from Heathrow and asked him to swap seats with his wife!But he was not distracted for long. Hough says: “We wanted to buy sugar from African producers who had sourced cane from farmers who had organised themselves into a smallholders’ company, certified by the Fairtrade Labelling Organisation (FLO). We could then sell Fairtrade sugar and send the fixed premium back for use in the local communities.”Sugar is a stand-alone product and used in many baked goods – Viennoiserie, cakes and biscuits, for example. “Tesco and Morrisons were among the first to show an interest, but we can now supply direct to plant bakeries or to smaller bakeries via Bako,” adds Hough.So how does Fairtrade sugar work? “We send the premiums back to the farming co-operatives in Zambia and Malawi. It’s that simple” he says. “When customers buy a bag, the premiums go straight into community projects. That means local villagers can get safe, clean drinking water from a bore hole for the first time in their lives instead of having to walk to the river with a bucket and carry often contaminated water back to their dwellings.The premiums also go to community health care and local electrical projects so villagers can use electricity for the first time. “One of the most exciting things was seeing how the money was being used to refurbish a local school, providing walls, doors, ceilings and a new roof,” says Hough.”The children come from all over and go to school in shifts. There are 600 altogether aged 7-18. They have 13 teachers and you could not have a happier bunch of kids.”What about the real nitty gritty – the premium? Hough says: “The premium is fixed at US$60 (£30) a tonne, US$80 (£40) if Organic. It goes straight into the farming cooperative bank account, there are no middlemen and it does not get lost.”The Kaleya Smallholders Company in Zambia typically comprises of 160 farmers, 90 of them women. It is well organised and gives farmers up to eight hectares each to grow products. In a year they may earn up to US$12,000, enough to feed a whole family. Life expectancy is low, so some farmers have to look after many dependents.In adjacent Malawi, the Fairtrade Cane Growers’ Association at Kasinthula gives three to four hectares of land to 280 farmers of which 60 are female. Says Hough: “I went to a meeting and the oldest farmer said a prayer at the beginning and end. It was very moving and I felt very privileged to see where the money was going and to meet people who worked so hard. The local sugar companies give a huge amount of support to these communities. Sales have been developed not only through Napier Brown but also other sugar companies and traders in Europe, following increased awareness and interest in Fairtrade. Even buying one bag of sugar makes a difference.”The sugars available are white refined, golden granulated, golden caster or demerara and these are increasingly used in cakes, biscuits, cereal bars and desserts. Importantly, any baker or retailer who uses Fairtrade sugar can ask the Fairtrade Foundation for permission to use its logo. So it can help bakers’ sales as well as farming co-operatives.Sounds pretty fair, doesn’t it? —-=== At a glance ===* Napier Brown supplies standard and organic Fairtrade sugar* It is cane sugar supplied as white granulated, golden granulated, golden caster and demerara and can be used in cakes, biscuits, desserts and jams* Usual bag size is 25kg* Napier Brown is BRC EFSIS, and Soil Association accreditedlast_img read more

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Bookings open for BIA

first_imgThis week we open for table bookings to the Baking Industry Awards, which take place on Tuesday 8 September at a new venue, the prestigious Park Lane Hilton.The evening kicks off with a Champagne reception, sponsored by Warburtons, taking place in the glamorous Wellington Room, which overlooks Hyde Park.As well as a celebrity presenter, still to be announced, the evening will have a 1930s theme from the Art Deco era. As part of the theme, two professional dancers, sponsored by Muntons, will appear from the highly popular BBC1 TV series Strictly Come Dancing, to entertain guests.To book places at a cost of £195 plus VAT or £1,895 plus VAT for a table of 10, contact Liz Ellis on 01293 846593 or email: [email protected] For entry forms contact Helen Law on 01293 846587 or email: [email protected] See also pages 24-25last_img read more

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Spice rack: fennel seeds

first_imgFennel seeds are produced by both the feathery annual herb and the bulbous perennial Florence fennel, which is eaten as a vegetable. The flowers produce a mass of seeds, which are quite sweet, and the flavour is similar to aniseed or liquorice. They are used in fish soups and stews and on top of grilled fish or meat. In some Mediterranean countries, the seeds are sprinkled on top of bread dough prior to baking. However, they can be included in other baked products. Add some to soda bread or make a seeded rye bread using a mixture of fennel seeds, cumin seeds and caraway seeds. Swedish Limpa bread, which usually uses aniseed, can be made by adding fennel seeds, honey, orange zest and juice to a light rye bread mixture. A few can be added to a traditional recipe for banana bread or carrot cake and you can make coconut macaroons a little different by adding a few fennel seeds to the mixture.Why not make savoury cheese cornbreads or corn muffins and flavour with some gently toasted fennel seeds? Or if making a vegetarian tart using, for example, roasted peppers and fennel with mozzarella cheese or Feta cheese, sprinkle with some seeds to accentuate the flavour of the fennel.Fiona Burrell, co-author of Leiths Baking Bible, from Leiths School of Food and Winelast_img read more

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Premier Foods’ boss steps down

first_imgMichael Clarke, chief executive of Premier Foods, has announced he will step down from his position 18 months after joining the company.Clarke joined the company, which produces Hovis bread, back in August 2011, and has decided to leave the board with immediate effect. He said he will remain available to the company until mid-2013 to hand over to his successor.He will be replaced by Gavin Darby, former boss of telecoms company Cable & Wireless, who will take up the chief executive position as of 4 February.David Beever, chairman of Premier Foods, said: “I am delighted to welcome Gavin Darby to Premier Foods. His strong fast-moving consumer goods background and management track record make him the ideal candidate to lead the company. The board very much looks forward to working with Gavin to continue driving sustainable profitable growth at Premier.”He added that Clarke and the team had done a first-class job in stabilising the business, strengthening its balance sheet, divesting non-core businesses and generating momentum. “This is a significant achievement in a challenging market and I would like to thank Mike on behalf of the board for his contribution,” Beever commented.Darby said: “I am very excited to be taking on this role. Although markets remain difficult, I look forward to working with the team to develop and grow the company’s power brands in the coming years. Premier Foods has great potential and I fully intend to invest a significant personal sum in the shares of the company after the full-year results are published in February, which the company will match.”last_img read more

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Renovator Certification

first_imgPainters, carpenters or anyone who renovates homes should attend a training June 29 in Oconee County that will explain new Environmental Protection Agency regulations for lead-based paints.Located at the Oconee County Civic Center, the training will be 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. and offered by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension through a partnership with Greenville Tech.The EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule took effect April 22 and affects contractors, property managers and others who work in housing or childcare centers built before 1978.Participants will learn how to minimize lead dust generation and soil contamination during maintenance, renovation and remodeling activities. Following these procedures will reduce the risk of lead exposure to employees, children and residents.Participants in the class will perform hands-on activities and will be tested at the end of class.Those who earn a passing score will be certified as renovators, a certification that is valid for five years. The class, which costs $260, is limited to the first 20 registrants. For more information, or to register, go to the website www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/housing.last_img read more

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Post-COVID marketing guide

first_imgDon’t let the doom and gloom of the economic news around COVID scare you. Being the heroes of the financial services world, now is the time for credit unions to don their capes, adjust their marketing plans, and do what they do best … help members in all walks of life. There’s no doubt that COVID-19 has changed so much about the credit union industry and how we serve members. But there’s one thing that hasn’t changed: our purpose to serve members during the good times and through the hard times. We’ve seen a huge shift in marketing sentiment since the US outbreak began and, now that “the great reopening” has started, it is clear how credit unions can pivot their marketing, brand, and member experience to shine in this post-COVID environment:Rework tactical plans. If there is one lesson we’ve seen from previous economic downturns, it’s not to take your foot off the gas when it comes to marketing and promotion. It’s important to keep in front of your members so they know you are working hard to stay on top of their needs. After all, that is what builds brand trust and loyalty. From a marketing standpoint, this means evaluating your pre-COVID tactical plan to identify areas that need adjustment, including budget. Tactics that are working for financial services providers and other brands include:Direct mail (yes, snail mail!) Postcards are also super cheap, especially if the quantity is higher, and can be a great way to increase loan volume when most credit unions are seeing a large decrease in loans.Digital marketing. Now that consumers are home a lot more, purchases and business decisions are happening online. If you aren’t taking advantage of cost-effective digital solutions, such as SEO/SEM, pay-per-click, inbound content marketing, and social media advertising, you are likely missing out on your members’ business.Video marketing and education. Because members are online more, consuming even more information than before, presenting your credit union and its services, marketing campaigns, and/or financial education resources has to be done in ways that are appealing and easy to digest. Video marketing is a great way to showcase your credit union’s culture, differentiate yourself from competitors, and increase brand awareness.  Transition marketing messaging. Low rates have historically been the biggest pull to attract members for loans, but with the huge increase in time spent online, the number of financial services providers jockeying for your members’ business has never been greater. Cut through the noise with clear, empathetic messaging to show them that your credit union has been there for over XX years serving them through the good times and bad.  After all, credit unions are the heroes of the financial services world. Why not take the opportunity to show them how you’ve kept that promise, especially over the last few months. Additionally, calls to action need to be focused towards driving the business to online channels to take action on any marketing campaign. Don’t forget about the messaging per product as well. For example, people aren’t traveling much (and likely won’t be much for the foreseeable future) so traditional marketing around personal loans, credit cards, and home equity loans being used for summer vacations could be transitioned to messaging around “staycations” or doing things to their home.Focus on your brand. Brands are continually evolving and a global pandemic doesn’t change that. Just as you transition your marketing message to show how you’ve helped members and your community/SEGs, etc. during this time, how your credit union has responded to this crisis and stepped up to meet member needs also has to be factored into the way your credit union presents its brand to the world. Don’t forget about employees. As essential businesses, even though lobbies were closed, your employees were still on the front lines fielding calls, taking loan applications, and doing everything needed so the credit union could continue to serve members during this interesting time. Be sure to include them in your marketing plans going forward so they know what to expect, but also take this opportunity to build closer relationships with them. Build a fun plan to foster camaraderie and decrease their stress levels once your credit union is fully open again. Having things like pizza parties, email quizzes for prizes, etc. are a great and inexpensive way to show your greatest assets just how much they mean to you. Additionally, as this pandemic has brought a significant increase in anxiety, depression, and mental health issues, also let them know you are here for them and you are a safe space for sharing if they are experiencing difficulties and need help.Evaluate and update your member experience. Sneeze guards, floor stickers, and face masks aside, the aim is to continue to have a wonderful member experience. Make sure your team is looking at this “new” way of serving members to identify ways to surprise and delight members while also using the important opportunity to uncover ways you can serve their individual financial needs. Modify your current products and service delivery. Unfortunately, most people think we will never be going back to “the old way” of doing things before COVID-19 happened. This means credit unions will need to look at their delivery of every product and service to ensure that it is in line with not only safety guidelines but also delivers the member experience you wish to provide. For example:How were members primarily applying for and getting loans before? Did we allow them the opportunity to apply online from the comfort of their home? Do we offer e-signatures so they can sign for their loan from home as well?Do we need to take the opportunity to share that we have e-statements and other mobile/online services to make banking quicker and safer for members?How are we delivering important account documents and is there an opportunity for us to utilize email or other forms of electronic delivery for safety?center_img 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Amanda Thomas Amanda is founder and president of TwoScore, a firm that channels her passion for the credit union mission and people to help credit unions under $100 million in assets reach … Web: www.twoscore.com Detailslast_img read more

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