CDC expects plentiful, on-target flu vaccine

first_imgSep 24, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Public health and medical leaders predicted today that this year’s influenza vaccine will match up well with circulating flu viruses—unlike last year’s vaccine—and that plenty of doses will be available.”We are optimistic that this year’s vaccine will be on target in protecting against the flu,” said Dr. Daniel B. Jernigan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in a news release from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID).”Last year at this time we had an indication that the vaccine might not be as effective,” Jernigan said at a press conference held today to promote flu immunization as flu season approaches. “There is no such indication this time.”CDC Director Julie Gerberding added that, on the basis of flu strains circulating in the southern hemisphere, “Right now we’re at a point where we feel very confident.”Two of the three components in last year’s vaccine—A/H3N2 and B—didn’t match well with the circulating flu strains. A preliminary study from Wisconsin showed that the H3N2 component provided 58% protection against circulating H3N2 viruses, but the B component offered no protection.Vaccine abundanceAt the news briefing, officials from the CDC and several medical societies also predicted that plenty of vaccine will be available this season.”Vaccine is out there in abundance,” said William Schaffner, MD, president-elect of the NFID and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “We should continue to vaccinate through the fall and into winter and into the early part of next year.”A newsletter from the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, a coalition of numerous medical and health organizations, said last week that about 148 million doses, a record number, is expected to be available this season in the United States. About 35 million doses had been distributed as of Sep 5, the coalition said.Last spring, the CDC recommended for the first time that school-age children, from 5 through 18, should receive flu immunizations, which added about 30 million children to the groups included in vaccination recommendations. (Children from 6 through 59 months old were included in earlier recommendations.) In all, 261 million Americans are targeted in the CDC recommendations, the NFID said.The reason for immunizing school-age children is that they have higher flu rates than most groups and the virus spreads easily in schools, said Dr. Renee Jenkins, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. “And reducing the rate in children reduces the rate in the community at large,” she added.Officials said 86 children died of flu in the 2007-08 season.Under-immunized groupsImmunization coverage varies widely among the different flu-shot target groups, officials said today. The NFID said immunization rates last year were 66.7% for people 65 and older—well below federal targets—and 36.2% for those between 50 and 64. CDC data show that only 21.3% of children aged 6 through 23 months were fully vaccinated in the 2006-07 season, the NFID reported.A recent NFID consumer survey of 2,029 adults pointed up the need for healthcare providers to promote flu vaccination, officials said. Seventy percent said they would be very likely to get vaccinated if their provider recommended it. But nearly 4 in 10 respondents overall, and nearly 1 in 5 elderly people, reported they had never discussed flu vaccination with their provider. Of those who had talked about the subject, half said they had raised it themselves.More than 30% of Americans who receive Medicare do not receive flu shots, said Kerry Weems, acting director of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in the NFID release. Medicare covers both flu and pneumococcal vaccinations for all beneficiaries. Officials also urged all Americans 65 and older to get the pneumococcal vaccine, which guards against infections that cause pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis.Coverage in healthcare workersOfficials at the briefing also stressed the need to increase flu immunization coverage among healthcare workers, only 42% of whom were vaccinated in 2006.Gerberding expressed a personal view that it is “unconscionable” for a healthcare worker to avoid flu immunization unless he or she has a medical contraindication.”I would encourage healthcare facilities to measure their levels of vaccination and report them,” and patients should ask about the rates, she said.When a reporter asked if any healthcare facilities are requiring employees to be vaccinated, Schaffner said, “There are individual facilities that are moving in that direction. We’re hoping that they will document their activities and publish that so we can all benefit from those things.”Another question was whether experts have identified particular groups of people who are less likely to get flu shots. Schaffner replied, “It’s quite clear that African-Americans and Hispanics and others don’t avail themselves as of immunization as often as Caucasians do.”In response to another question, Gerberding declined to predict how bad the upcoming flu season will be. “As far as prognostication, I’ve learned the hard way never to predict anything about influenza,” she said.Schaffner offered a different answer: “I’ll predict something: There will be influenza, it will come, we’ll have an outbreak, there will be people ill, some will be hospitalized, and some will die.”See also: Sep 19 National Vaccine Summit newsletterhttp://www.preventinfluenza.org/summit_news_91908.pdflast_img read more

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Ndidi, Iheanacho miss out on Champions League spot, as Leicester City bow to Man Utd

first_imgAfter 298 days in the top-four spots in the longest season in recent memory, Leicester city of Wilfred Ndidi and Kelechi Iheanacho, have missed out on Champions League football, losing 0-2 to Manchester United. A win on the final day was all that was needed to return to Europe’s top table, but another valiant effort ended in defeat, Bruno Fernandes’ penalty and Jesse Lingard’s very late tap-in separating the sides. City were very good for much of the match, but just like the story of the season, they did not have enough to get over the line. They huffed, they puffed, and they tested David de Gea, but they could not find a way through and have to settle for fifth.Advertisement Loading… It is the fifth best season in City’s history, and yet it will feel like a huge disappointment. City had a 14-point cushion inside the top four at the start of the year, but their bottom-half form since then, with Brendan Rodgers’ side hit with crucial injuries, saw them slip down the table, eventually falling out of the Champions League places in the final week of the campaign. In a huge final-day showdown, it looked like they might do it. United were nervy, and City had chances, Iheanacho scuffing at De Gea, Golden Boot winner Jamie Vardy heading against the bar. read also:Leicester City striker ‘offered’ to Premier League rivals But when it came to the crunch, City lost their head. Hamza Choudhury lost the ball and Anthony Martial was fouled in the box, Fernandes converting. City tried to mount a comeback, but in the frustrating final moments, Jonny Evans was sent off and Kasper Schmeichel was robbed by Lingard. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Final submissions in Russell hearing due next month

first_imgAFTER five sittings spanning almost a month, presentation of evidence was completed Friday at the hearing convened by the Independent Anti-Doping Disciplinary Panel into the allegation that West Indies cricketer Andre Russell violated a whereabouts clause.It is expected that proceedings will be completed on Thursday, November 17, the day on which final submissions are to be heard from each legal team.The stenographer is expected to submit the transcript of the evidence provided throughout the hearing to both sides on or by Monday, October 24.The parties have also agreed that each side’s written submissions are to be filed by 4:00 pm on Monday, November 7…While explaining the challenges of updating his whereabouts, Russell appeared to make an impassioned plea for understanding. He explained that he normally gets help to submit his whereabouts and was not educated at any point on how to do it.He continued that, as a professional cricketer who adheres to JADCO’s system, it was never his intention to “abandon” the process of filing whereabouts.Russell also indicated that he felt that being a part of the international testing pool would negate any instance of him missing JADCO-organised tests…last_img read more

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Zimbabwe Win Jinx Continues with Draw against Uganda

first_imgZimbabwe (yellow shirts) last won a match at an Africa Cup of Nations finals in 2006. The jinx continues with yesterday’s 1-1 draw with Uganda in the AFCON 2019 Zimbabwe’s Knowledge Musona and Uganda’s Patrick Kaddu both missed glorious chances to get a winning goal.Musona hit the crossbar when faced with an open goal from only four yards out and then, after Zimbabwe’s Evans Rusike had a shot saved on the goalline, Kaddu volleyed over from six yards with the goal empty.Zimbabwe, who were aiming for only their third win at a Cup of Nations finals, now have to beat DR Congo in their final group match on Sunday to have a chance of making it out of the group phase for the first time.Uganda top the group with four points from two games, but will be overtaken by Egypt if the hosts beat DR Congo later on Wednesday.Nottingham Forest defender Tendayi Darikwa and Alec Mudimu, who plays for Welsh Premier League side Cefn Druids, were both in the Zimbabwe side, with Bevis Mugabi, released by Yeovil Town at the end of last season, among the Uganda starting line-up.In Group B, Nigeria became the first team to qualify for the last 16 as they beat Guinea 1-0.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Uganda and Zimbabwe wednesday played out an entertaining 1-1 draw in Group A of the Africa Cup of Nations in Cairo, Egypt.Uganda took an early lead through Emmanuel Okwi’s close-range finish after Zimbabwe goalkeeper George Chigova had parried Lumala Abdu’s shot.But Zimbabwe equalised when Khama Billiat scored after fine work down the left wing from team-mate Ovidy Karuru.last_img read more

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Scientists find key biomarker of Parkinsons disease in the retina

first_imgJun 8 2018A research involving scientists from the University of Alicante and the United States notes that the accumulation of a protein known as alpha-synuclein in the retina is a key Parkinson’s biomarker that could help detect the degree of severity of the disease.The work has been published this month in Movement Disorders, a prestigious a worldwide journal in the field of clinical neurology edited by the International Association of Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders, and is part of a broader scientific project funded by the Michael J. Fox Foundation.The main researcher of this project, which started last February is Dr. Nicolás Cuenca, coordinator of the research group Visual System Neurobiology and Neurodegenerative Retinal Diseases Therapy at the University of Alicante. The main researcher of this project, which started last February, is Dr. Nicolas Cuenca, coordinator of the research group Visual System Neurobiology and Neurodegenerative Retinal Diseases Therapy at the University of Alicante (UA)This worldwide novel work has been conducted with retinas from deceased Parkinson’s patients, donated to Sun Banner, a center dedicated to the study of this disease and Alzheimer’s, and sent to the UA to be studied by Cuenca and also by the predoctoral researcher at the University of Alicante Isabel Ortuño Lizarán.Cuenca and Ortuño Lizarán explain, in an interview with EFE, that they have studied in detail the alpha-synuclein protein as one of the main pathological marks that are usually analyzed to determine Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disease that affects seven and ten million people in the world.Parkinson’s patients present as a characteristic sign of this disease an accumulation of the aforementioned protein in the brain, forming a structure called Lewy bodies, and this number increases as the disease progresses.Cuenca and Ortuño Lizarán emphasize that the scientific relevance of their work is based on the fact that, for the first time, they have identified Lewy bodies in retinas of people with Parkinson’s disease. This is the result of the study of the retinas sent by the Banner Sun Health Research Institute from deceased Parkinson’s patients, whose clinical and pathological data of the brain are collected in this American institute.Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerAlso, researchers have found a correlation: the greater the amount of alpha-synuclein in the retina, the more Parkinson’s motor and clinical disturbances, thus, the more serious the condition.The accumulation of this protein in the retina forming Lewy bodies is similar to that found in the brain in Parkinson’s patients. “That is why we believe that alpha-synuclein is a helpful biomarker for Parkinson’s; it can show the degree of severity of the disease and reflects, in some way, what is happening in the brain,” Cuenca added.Ortuño Lizarán stated that currently there is no technique applied in medicine to detect alpha-synuclein in the retina of a living person. The work reveals a second finding in that this protein does not only appears in patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s, but also in some who did not present their usual motor symptoms (tremors and slowness of movement) although their brains were already affected by this disease.According to Ortuño, this indicates that alpha-synuclein can also be an early biomarker, which could help detect Parkinson’s before the clinical symptoms appear.One aspect of this research work, which is not included in the journal Movement Disorders, is that, other than the accumulation of the alpha-synuclein protein, another relevant process that occurs in the brain of Parkinson’s patients is observed in the retina: death of dopaminergic cells (found both in retina and brain).Parkinson’s disease is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, which release dopamine, a key neurotransmitter for motor function, and people who suffer from this disease often experience visual disturbances.Both researchers emphasize that retina represents the ideal place to study Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis as it is an extension of the brain and part of the central nervous system. Source:https://web.ua.es/en/actualidad-universitaria/2018/mayo18/21-27/ua-and-us-scientists-show-that-a-key-parkinson-s-biomarker-can-be-identified-in-the-retina.htmllast_img read more

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