Gov. Wolf Signs Two Bills into Law, Vetoes Flawed Telemedicine Bill, Releases Cross-Agency Guidance for Telehealth

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter April 29, 2020 Gov. Wolf Signs Two Bills into Law, Vetoes Flawed Telemedicine Bill, Releases Cross-Agency Guidance for Telehealthcenter_img Bill Signing,  Press Release,  Public Health Governor Tom Wolf today signed into law two bills: House Bill 1869 allows for National Guard members called to active duty to be covered under the Heart and Lung Act if they contract COVID-19 while performing their duties, and House Bill 752 provides for the Game Commission to pay a fair market value for land in Allegheny County.Gov. Wolf also vetoed Senate Bill 857, a telemedicine bill that passed the Senate unanimously last year before being amended to an untenable version in the House.“I supported a prior printer’s number of the bill, but as amended in the House of Representatives, this legislation arbitrarily restricts the use of telemedicine for certain doctor-patient interactions,” Gov. Wolf said. “As amended, this bill interferes with women’s health care and the crucial decision-making between patients and their physicians.”The full veto memo can be found as a PDF here or on Scribd.In addition to the telemedicine bill veto, the governor released cross-agency guidance on telehealth, citing its importance as a health care delivery option during COVID-19 and as providing it pertains to his authority under the Disaster Declaration signed in early March.Given the potential for widespread transmission of COVID-19 across Pennsylvania and to limit its spread, many health care providers and patients are expanding use of telehealth rather than in-person health care services.Today, the governor announced cross-agency guidance on steps taken to ensure that patients in need of vital health care services are receiving them in a timely, appropriate manner. Multiple state agencies are involved in providing expanded telehealth services, including the departments of State, Health, Drug and Alcohol Programs, Human Services and the Insurance Department.The guidance, available as a PDF here or on Scribd, includes:Expanded Role of ProvidersExpanding Reimbursement for Telehealth ServicesTelehealth for Infant Toddler Early Intervention ProceduresTelehealth for Behavioral HealthTelehealth for Substance Use Disorder TreatmentView this information in Spanish.last_img read more

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Half-time: Fulham 1 Liverpool 1

first_imgDaniel Sturridge equalised after Kolo Toure’s ninth-minute own goal had gifted Fulham the lead at Craven Cottage.Rene Meulensteen’s side, bottom of the Premier League but buoyed by Sunday’s draw at Manchester United, had Liverpool on the back foot straightaway and Simon Mignolet saved Ryan Tunnicliffe’s low shot in the opening minute.The Whites kept up the early pressure and Toure had to react quickly to prevent Darren Bent getting to Kieran Richardson’s left-wing cross.But the next time Richardson crossed from the left Toure contrived to slice the ball into his own net from close range.On-loan Tottenham midfielder Lewis Holtby almost doubled the lead with a 20-yard effort that fizzed just wide.And Bent headed over from seven yards out after being found by another Richardson cross.Having struggled for most of the first half, Liverpool levelled out of nothing four minutes before the interval.Steven Gerrard carved open the Fulham defence with a perfect through-ball and Sturridge fired in off the far post.Fulham: Stekelenburg; Riether, Heitinga, Burn, Riise; Tunnicliffe, Sidwell, Kvist, Richardson; Holtby; Bent. Subs: Stockdale, Hangeland, Kasami, Kačaniklić, Duff, Cole, Parker.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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A’s trade with Kansas City Royals for starting pitcher

first_imgOAKLAND — With the slow returns of Jesus Luzardo, Sean Manaea and Jharel Cotton to the big leagues — and Frankie Montas’ suspension —  the Oakland A’s decided to act fast in the starting pitching market.GM Dave Forst made the call to Kansas City a few days ago and, Sunday morning both teams pulled the trigger: the A’s acquired 33-year-old right-handed starter Homer Bailey (7-6, 4.80) for 23-year-old minor league infielder Kevin Merrell, who was playing in Double-A Midland.“With a starting …last_img

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CAUV still part of budget talks

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As state budget negotiators enter the final days of House-Senate budget talks, the Ohio Farmers Union reminds legislators that CAUV reforms contained in both versions of the budget are desperately needed and overdue.“We’ve been fighting for some meaningful changes in the CAUV formula since around 2012,” said Joe Logan, OFU President . “It’s been a long haul, and along the way farmland property taxes have increased 300 percent or more for family farmers in every corner of Ohio.”Logan points out that while farmland property taxes have skyrocketed, other small businesses in Ohio have seen large tax breaks.“Family farms, which have struggled to generate income in an era of low commodity prices, are perhaps the only small business category that have been taxed more while others’ taxes have decreased over the past three state budgets,” Logan said.CAUV, or Current Agricultural Use Valuation, is the way farmland property tax values are determined.last_img read more

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BG police seek help to ID vehicle of interest in vandalism case

first_imgThe Battle Ground Police Department has obtained video that captured a vehicle of interest in Friday’s citywide vandalism spree.The video footage can be viewed at www.facebook.com/CityofBGWA, according to a news release from the city.Anyone who recognizes the vehicle or has any information should contact Detective Sgt. Kim Armstrong at 360-342-5252 or [email protected] unknown suspects damaged a building and multiple vehicles, according to the city.Investigators have already received some reports and tips but are seeking video surveillance from homes or businesses in the affected areas, the news release states.Anonymous tips can be reported online at www.cityofbg.org/tips.last_img

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Homes in wealthier neighborhoods found to harbor more arthropod species

first_imgCredit: David Wagner/public domain Journal information: Biology Letters First study of arthropods in US homes finds huge biodiversity © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Urban ecologists have been observing how socioeconomics impact species diversity for nearly two decades. Previous studies have determined that higher affluence is frequently associated with more biological diversity across species of plants, birds, bats, and lizards–a phenomenon coined the “luxury effect.” Scientists have only recently begun examining the relationship between socioeconomics and arthropods, a group that includes insects and their close relatives. Arthropods can have six legs (like moths), eight legs (like spiders), or sometimes one hundred legs (like centipedes), and fly or wander from the outside environment into the indoor world. The image above highlights an arthropod often identified indoors: the book louse.”The biodiversity of the indoor environment is still a relatively unexplored area of research,” says Michelle Trautwein, co-author and curator of entomology at the Academy. “Our houses are really permeable and dynamic. Through our studies, we hope to inspire citizens all over the globe to get curious about the species in their everyday lives. We still have so much to learn about indoor ecology and the ever-evolving relationship between humans and arthropods.” Credit: © Matt Bertone of North Carolina State University Explore further (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the California Academy of Sciences and North Carolina State University has found that homes in wealthy neighborhoods tend to harbor more arthropod species than do homes in places that are less affluent. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the team describes how they conducted an arthropod survey of homes from a variety of locations throughout the Raleigh, North Carolina area, what they found and possible reasons for the differences. A common arthropod scientists encounter in the home: the carpet beetle. Credit: © Matt Bertone and North Carolina State University Citation: Homes in wealthier neighborhoods found to harbor more arthropod species (2016, August 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-homes-wealthier-neighborhoods-harbor-arthropod.html More information: Misha Leong et al. Exoskeletons and economics: indoor arthropod diversity increases in affluent neighbourhoods, Biology Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0322AbstractIn urban ecosystems, socioeconomics contribute to patterns of biodiversity. The ‘luxury effect’, in which wealthier neighbourhoods are more biologically diverse, has been observed for plants, birds, bats and lizards. Here, we used data from a survey of indoor arthropod diversity (defined throughout as family-level richness) from 50 urban houses and found that house size, surrounding vegetation, as well as mean neighbourhood income best predict the number of kinds of arthropods found indoors. Our finding, that homes in wealthier neighbourhoods host higher indoor arthropod diversity (consisting of primarily non-pest species), shows that the luxury effect can extend to the indoor environment. The effect of mean neighbourhood income on indoor arthropod diversity was particularly strong for individual houses that lacked high surrounding vegetation ground cover, suggesting that neighbourhood dynamics can compensate for local choices of homeowners. Our work suggests that the management of neighbourhoods and cities can have effects on biodiversity that can extend from trees and birds all the way to the arthropod life in bedrooms and basements.Press release In studying the numbers, the researchers found that the average home in a wealthy neighborhood had approximately 100 different species of arthropods in it, whereas those in less expensive neighborhoods had roughly half that number. The researchers suggest the discrepancy is due to differences in the environment outside of the homes. Richer neighborhoods tend to have houses with lush gardens and parks and the people that live there tend to expend more time and money on them resulting in more places for bugs to breed. Most people know that sometimes bugs get into their houses—flies, ants, mosquitoes and other insects are quite common, though most people do their best to get rid of them. What most people probably do not know is that a lot of other types of bugs live in their home as well—most of which they never see. Many of these bugs are arthropods—invertebrate animals such as spiders, crustaceans and other insects. In this new effort, the researchers sought to learn more about the diversity of these bugs in homes. They note also that prior studies had found that richer neighborhoods tended to have more plant and animal diversity in areas outside of the home. For this study, they wanted to know what was going on inside.As the researchers also note, few studies have looked at biodiversity in the home, which is unfortunate as people spend on average 90 percent of their time indoors—which means sharing space with a plethora of other creatures. To gain some perspective, the researchers fanned out across the city of Raleigh asking homeowners if they would allow a survey to be conducted—the team wound up gaining access to approximately 50 homes, all within forty miles of the downtown area, from a variety of neighborhoods.last_img read more

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Missing Explores girl Trafficking

first_imgIt is a shocking reality that there are 3 million sex workers in India, with 1.2 million of them being young girls. The average age of recruitment of girls into prostitution is between nine and twelve years. In order to counter this alarming fact, veteran photographer and installation artist Leena Kejriwal launched a public art project Missing at The Eros Hotel in the national Capital on Wednesday.Missing creates a series of larger-than-life black silhouettes of young girls, placed against the urban skyline. Constructed from iron sheets, forged and painted pitch black, they seem like sharp, black holes cut out of the sky – holes into which metaphorically millions of girls disappear from the face of the earth. The artwork is supplemented with an augmented reality app, that allows anyone with a smart phone to engage with the installations and become a part of the project. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Kejriwal said, “I am involved with the issue of sexual trafficking for the past 12 years, having worked closely with various activists in the field. The staggering number of missing girls and impunity of law drove me to launch this project, which will educate the masses on the magnitude of the issue, in an emotional and informative way.”The Missing project aimed to raise awareness amongst millions of girls who are being trafficked into prostitution and this project will enable these girls to go back to school and hence have a better future.” Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixRuchira Gupta (Founder and President of Apne Aap Women Worldwide and adviser to the US government, on human trafficking) says, “Missing urges people to think about the girls who are pulled into prostitution. The Missing silhouettes simulate a call for action, by raising awareness.” Curator Shaheen Merali enunciates, “The work of artist Leena Kejriwal is part of a greater body of work undertaken by artists in the global context, where artists combine their skills to enable a wider society to communicate.Kejriwal’s belief in the cause, along with an overwhelming public response, motivated her to take this project forward. After Delhi, Missing will move to Mumbai, Kolkata, Bangalore, Chennai, Pune, Hyderabad, Guwahati, Dhanbad, and Ahmedabad.last_img read more

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