Stephen Owens to Retire in December

first_imgAfter a distinguished career advocating for strong public defense, Stephen T. Owens, Public Defender of Indiana, is retiring. The Indiana Supreme Court-appointed Mr. Owens to the position in June 2011. Chief Justice Loretta Rush appreciates Owens’ decades of public service, “Steve gave a voice to those asking for a review of their case and because of his dedication to that step, our system includes fairness for all.”Owens came to the State Public Defender’s Office in 1986. He was named the Assistant Chief Deputy of Personnel in 1987. He is a graduate of Illinois College and the University of Dayton. Under his leadership, the Office reviewed thousands of cases, advocated for sentence reductions for clients, and improved services for juveniles. Mr. Owens said, “It has been an honor to work at the State Public Defender’s Office for over 33 years. During those decades, I worked with many accomplished attorneys and staff who were equally committed to representing the rights of indigent defendants. I am privileged to have dedicated my career to this essential office in Indiana’s justice system.”The Public Defender of Indiana is a state-funded Judicial Branch agency that provides representation to indigent incarcerated individuals (including certain juveniles) in post-conviction relief cases to assure the fundamental fairness of the criminal justice system. It provides services in all capital cases. The Office receives about 500 requests from inmates each year asking for their case to be reviewed. The Public Defender is appointed by the Indiana Supreme Court. Details on the process for selecting Owens’ successor will be announced soon.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Hue Jackson hopes to be an NFL head coach again

first_img Texans plan on GM-by-committee for 2019 season, report says “Oh, yeah, I mean I think I can,” Jackson said. “I mean, just because the situation in Cleveland [didn’t work out] doesn’t mean that you can’t coach. There’s a lot of great coaches who came before me that coached there and went on and did great things. Sometimes, the situation is different. I think if people dig in and really take the time to look at the overall situation there, maybe they would understand it more.”At the same time, I understand what narrative gets put out there, that’s what people know. Hopefully, people will think back to the times when I’ve put myself in that position. I had to be doing something right. To go back and be a coordinator again or be a head coach, I do believe it’s in my future. I’ve just got to go work through the process and see where it goes.” Related News Jackson coached the Browns to a 2-5-1 record last season before he was fired by Cleveland. Over the course of his career, he’s put together one of the worst head coaching records in NFL history. Although his teams have gone 11-41-1 collectively, the Bengals hired him as a special assistant on their staff shortly after the Browns released him. But he didn’t last long in Cincinnati, as the Bengals also fired head coach Marvin Lewis shortly after he failed to win a playoff game for the 16th consecutive season.“Here’s a guy who knows how to overcome,” Jackson said when asked his narrative. “There’s a lot of people who would run from it all. I’m not going to run from it. At the end of the day, our staff and the people who led Cleveland, that doesn’t mean those coaches can’t coach or they don’t understand what they’re doing. Maybe that just wasn’t the right fit, the right situation for that group, and they just need to have the right opportunity to have success.”Despite interviewing for the Bengals coaching job and the role of offensive coordinator with the Cardinals, Jackson remains on the job hunt.center_img Robbie Gould’s future with 49ers unclear as deadline approaches Hue Jackson is hopeful he’ll get to serve as head coach again one day.While speaking Wednesday on WFNZ Charlotte, Jackson opened up about being unemployed for the first time in over 30 years and expressed his desire to get back on the football field.last_img read more

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Grassley hearing positive things about passage of USMCA

first_imgWASHINGTON — Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley says he’s hearing encouraging news about progress on the U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement.The trade deal must first go before the U.S. House before it would go to the Senate, and Grassley says he’s seen recent reports in the media quoting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi saying a vote will come very soon. “She expects it to be done yet this year,” Grassley says. “Those are the strongest points I’ve heard from her. I’ve heard nothing but positive comments from her about USMCA since I discussed it with her three months ago in her office.”Many Republicans are critical of the Democrat-led House for focusing so much time on trying to impeach President Trump, but Grassley says this word from Pelosi on USMCA is cause for optimism. “This is the first that we’ve heard a period of time for it to be brought up,” Grassley says. “If it’s brought up even late this year in the House of Representatives, if it passes the House of Representatives, we can get it up right away in the United States Senate.”Grassley says Pelosi told him she didn’t want to bring the trade agreement up in the House until she was sure it had the votes to pass, and he remains confident of its chances in the Senate. “There is a limit on debate ahead of time so we know at a certain time after this debate starts, we have an up or down vote, we don’t have any amendments, we have just one vote,” Grassley says. “I think it’ll be approved, easy, in the United States Senate.”According to data released last month from a group called Americans for Free Trade, Iowa farmers and businesses have faced $343 million in retaliatory tariffs since the trade war began in February of 2018.last_img read more

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Dutch roll out orange carpet to woo postBrexit business

Efforts by The Netherlands to attract businesses leaving Britian due to Brexit got a boost last month when Unilever picked Rotterdam over London for its unified headquarters Sweet tax deals, a business-friendly climate and an English-speaking population. The Netherlands is going all out to attract companies leaving Britain post-Brexit in search of a new EU-based home. © 2018 AFP Many international firms have been seduced by Amsterdam’s picturesque canals and its Zuidas business district To those still hesitating, the NIFA promises “we roll out the orange carpet,” vowing it is a “one-stop-shop” with “tailor-made” guidance for companies wanting to establish or expand in Europe.In 2017, 18 companies chose the Netherlands “for reasons linked to Brexit,” said Bakhuizen.Many international firms have been seduced by Amsterdam’s picturesque canals and its Zuidas business district, easily reached by train or from Schiphol airport.The financial sector is the city’s most important, representing 25 percent of the local economy and providing 255,000 jobs, about 19 percent of the total workforce, according to the municipality.Banking on successMore than 50 European and international banks currently call Amsterdam home to their branches or subsidiaries. They were joined in September by the Japanese mega-bank Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MUFG) which chose the Dutch capital over Paris as the European headquarters of its brokerage activities.”We have great digital connectivity,” added Vera Al, spokeswoman for the city’s deputy mayor Udo Kock.”We have a big creative and tech hub,” she said, adding that was “the reason why Booking.com, Netflix, Facebook, Uber and Google have offices in Amsterdam”.Uber, Netflix and Amazon also recently announced they were expanding their Amsterdam bases, hiring hundreds of new staff.But with the city already overcrowded, some analysts fear it could struggle to provide office space and housing. Dutch officials however point to other big cities, such as Rotterdam, all linked by highly-efficient public transport.’We’re not vultures’And as Brexit approaches the Dutch are not sitting on their laurels.”We want to attract the most companies possible,” said Bakhuizen, saying contacts with international business have been stepped up.After the 2016 Brexit vote, the NIFA swiftly boosted its team, taking on six more staff—two based in London, two in The Hague and two in the United States.”But we work in the proper way,” Bakhuizen said, adding “we don’t want to act like vultures” circling their prey. Citation: Dutch roll out ‘orange carpet’ to woo post-Brexit business (2018, April 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-dutch-orange-carpet-woo-post-brexit.html Explore further Dutch bid to be new home for EU medicine agency With less than a year before Britain formally leaves the European Union at midnight on March 29, 2019, the Dutch government has deployed a small army of lobbyists hoping to persuade companies to pick Rotterdam or Amsterdam over Paris or Frankfurt for their new base.Via the Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency (NIFA), an official arm of the economic affairs ministry, the Dutch government is currently “in touch with more than 200 companies,” spokesman Michiel Bakhuizen told AFP.”These are companies wishing to leave Britain or international businesses who are looking to set up in an EU country, and from now on, have to avoid London.”So far things have been going well, from a Dutch perspective.Last month the Anglo-Dutch consumer products giant Unilever decided to end its dual-headed legal structure, severing its London base and regrouping around its headquarters in Rotterdam.The company denied the decision had anything to do with Brexit, but that didn’t lessen the blow to the British.And Amsterdam is now preparing for the arrival of the European Medicines Agency, after winning a hard-fought battle against Milan to be the new home of the EMA and its 900 staff when it leaves London next year.Fiscal benefitsDutch officials say they have a good case. The Netherlands has a modern infrastructure, good digital and communications providers, and 90 percent of the population speaks English.”We’re no island,” the NIFA says somewhat snidely on it website. “We’re on the continent, close to Europe’s 500 million consumers, not to mention your business customers.”Roel Beetsma, an economist from the University of Amsterdam, agreed, saying the country has “a good business climate, encouraged by government measures, a good level of education, a high quality of life and a central place in the heart of Europe with a focus on the international.”Three successive governments led by business-friendly Prime Minister Mark Rutte have already made the country attractive for investors and those seeking to draw international talent. “Business taxes and the 30 percent tax reduction rule for qualified expats are advantageous,” said Bakhuizen, Brexit spokesman at the ministry for economic affairs. This document is subject to copyright. 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