Bandera family to host annual Christmas dinner at 3 locations

first_imgThe Bandera family hosts its’ “Bandera Family Christmas Dinner” every year. This will be the 30th dinner. (WBNG) — The Bandera family will be hosting three dinners on Christmas Day. American Legion Post 80 — 76 Main St., Binghamton — 12 to 3 p.m.American Legion Post 189 — 29 Sheldon St., Norwich — 1 to 4 p.m.Saint Ambrose Church School Cafeteria — 203 Washington Ave., Endicott — 12 to 3 p.m. center_img Locations include:last_img

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ABP settles last remaining mortgage-backed securities lawsuits

first_imgThe €293bn Dutch civil service scheme ABP has reached a settlement with Credit Suisse and Morgan Stanley over the alleged mis-selling of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS).ABP had argued that both banks knowingly provided the pension fund with false and misleading information.According to its initial filing, it claimed it purchased RMBS in 2006-07 – “based on material misrepresentation and omissions” – that were far riskier than had been represented.The settlements mean ABP has now wrapped up all pending legal cases against banks stemming from disputed mortgage-backed securities. To date, it has settled with Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan Chase and mortgage provider Countrywide in similar cases, as well as Goldman Sachs, which with it reached an agreement in April. At the time, Henk Brouwer, chairman at ABP, said: “We are pleased to see these cases being concluded satisfactorily one by one.“We have full confidence all will be completed in due course, as evidence that all parties involved are looking to the future, leaving past grievances and practices behind them.”The pension fund declined to put a figure on the Goldman Sachs settlement, but a spokesman stressed that it had been “good by all standards”.Respecting the Credit Suisse and Morgan Stanley cases, ABP said it was “satisfied” with the outcome of the settlements but declined to specify the amounts involved, explaining that this had been one of the conditions agreed with the banks.last_img read more

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Ethane Cloud at Titan: Too Little, Too Late?

first_imgThose following the Titan exploration by Cassini-Huygens have wondered where the ethane went.  Oceans of ethane hundreds of meters deep, if not kilometers deep, were predicted but not found, as reported previously (see 04/25/2003 and 10/16/2003 pre-Huygens reports, 01/15/2005 and 01/21/2005 Huygens early results, and 12/05/2005 review; see also New Scientist analysis of the “total revolution” in thinking about Titan going on because of the lack of oceans).  Now, finally, Cassini found something at least: a cloud of ethane at the north pole (see Cassini press release)  Is it enough to blanket the embarrassment of finding Titan to be a dry, young surface with only trace amounts of ethane?    The findings made by Cassini’s Virtual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) were published in Science this week,1 and described in a Perspectives article by Cassini atmospheric scientist Mike Flasar in the same issue of Science.2  Indeed, a “vast tropospheric cloud” of ethane was observed over the north pole in a series of observations between Dec. 2004 and Sept. 2006 (this cloud contrasts with the south-polar cloud believed composed of methane).3  The abstract leads one to believe this solves the problem of the missing ethane:The derived characteristics indicate that this cloud is composed of ethane and forms as a result of stratospheric subsidence and the particularly cool conditions near the moon’s north pole.  Preferential condensation of ethane, perhaps as ice, at Titan’s poles during the winters may partially explain the lack of liquid ethane oceans on Titan’s surface at middle and lower latitudes.That word “partially” is key, though, as shown in subsequent discussions in the paper.  First, they restate the problem in stark terms, to show the seriousness of the prediction that failed:Methane (the second most abundant atmospheric constituent after nitrogen) is dissociated irreversibly by solar ultraviolet light, producing primarily ethane and, at one-sixth and one-10th of the ethane production rate, respectively, acetylene and haze, as well as other less abundant organic molecules.  These photochemical by-products precipitate to Titan’s surface.  Titan’s atmospheric composition and photochemical models indicate that ethane accumulates as a liquid (at the equatorial surface temperature of 93.5 K) at a rate of ~300 m (if global) over Titan’s lifetime of 4.5 billion years, whereas solid sediments, including acetylene and haze particles, accumulate at roughly one-third of this rate.  Thus, unless methane is a recent addition to Titan’s atmosphere or ethane incorporates itself into surface solids, it has been reasoned that a considerable fraction of the surface should be covered with liquid ethane.  Titan’s surface reveals dunes of solid sediments, probably including haze particles and acetylene ice.  In addition, the surface is riddled with alluvial features, suggesting the occurrence of methane rain in the past.  Craters are rare, indicating geological relaxation as well as their burial by photochemical sediments.  Yet Titan appears depleted of its most abundant photochemical by-product.  Except for the ethane-damp surface measured by Huygens, no condensed form of ethane has been detected, despite its rapid production in Titan’s stratosphere and the expectation of finding ethane-rich oceans before the Cassini encounter.The same is admitted by University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Lab in a press release (see EurekAlert): “Ethane is by far the most plentiful byproduct when methane breaks down,” it states.  “If methane has been a constituent of the atmosphere throughout Titan’s 4.5-billion-year lifetime — and there was no reason to suspect it had not — the large moon would be awash with seas of ethane, scientists theorized.”  That’s why most artist conceptions were amply illustrated with liquid before Cassini found a dry desert (05/04/2006) with a few possible lakes at high latitudes (07/24/2006).    The science team tried to get a fix on the composition of the cloud and the mass of ethane within it from the four oblique views obtained by VIMS.  Best guess by inferring spectral properties, particle sizes and altitude is that the cloud is indeed ethane, that condenses at 30-50 km above the pole and precipitates down, falling at 3 km per month.  “If conditions remain cool enough throughout the year,” they infer, “Titan may accumulate ethane ice each winter at the poles and develop year-round polar caps.”  Direct evidence of an ethane ice cap will have to await future flybys by Cassini (perhaps the high-latitude pass on October 9).  What about the south pole, though, which has been imaged?  No simple answers, unfortunately, and we’ll have to wait to find out, but what we know is not that convincing yet:Presently, there is no direct evidence of polar caps composed of ethane.  The northern pole has not been imaged.  Cassini images of the southern pole do not indicate the morphology of 2 km of ethane ice, assuming current rates of ethane production over the past 4.5 billion years, accumulated within 35° of the poles.  Yet south polar images suggest flow features, possibly associated with a smaller quantity of ethane ice accumulated on the young surface.  The detection of surficial ethane ice is hindered by the correlation of ethane features and methane signatures, which obscure the visibility of Titan’s surface.  In addition, the polar surface is probably distinct and varied.  Similarly, other hydrocarbons would precipitate preferentially at the poles and pollute the ethane ice, and any lowland methane lakes would dissolve and melt ethane, because the mixture’s eutectic temperature is 72.5 K.  Such lakes might condense out of Titan’s humid lower troposphere during winter.  The surface distribution of liquid or solid ethane, whether corralled into the polar regions by circulation or transported by surface flows to lower latitudes, will be determined with radar and near-infrared images of the geomorphology, radio determinations of the polar temperatures, and infrared measurements of the polar composition, which are scheduled for future Cassini encounters with Titan.What does Dr. Flasar think of all this?  His commentary focuses primarily on the atmospheric circulation on Titan.  At the end, his reference to this problem is delicately understated:Until now, clouds of the most abundant product of methane dissociation, ethane, have eluded detection.  The Griffith et al.  identification of polar ethane clouds is reassuring, in that it validates the basic ideas we have about Titan’s meteorology and chemistry: first, that condensation does occur, as expected, in the lower stratosphere, and second, that the inferred altitudes of the ethane cloud (30 to 50 km) are consistent with subsidence in the winter polar region.  This and other clues that we will obtain will help us to sort out the things we still puzzle over.The biggest puzzle on his mind is, undoubtedly, where is all the ethane?  It’s not enough to answer that it just stacks up at the poles.  The U of A press release spoke with lead author Caitlin Griffith, and reported, “If ethane was produced at today’s rate over Titan’s entire lifetime, a total of two kilometers of ethane would have precipitated over the poles.  But that seems unlikely, Griffith said.”  Why?  The south pole, which should roughly match the north pole, shows no such ethane ice cap.1Griffith et al., “Evidence for a Polar Ethane Cloud on Titan,” Science, 15 September 2006: Vol.  313. no. 5793, pp. 1620-1622, DOI: 10.1126/science.1128245.2F. M. Flasar, “Planetary Science: Titan’s Polar Weather,” Science, 15 September 2006: Vol. 313. no. 5793, pp. 1582-1583, DOI: 10.1126/science.1130698.3Methane, CH4 is exposed to the solar wind in the upper atmosphere of Titan, a continuous process that strips off hydrogen atoms.  The ionized methyl groups CH3– rapidly recombine into ethane C2H6, which has nowhere to go but down.  At surface temperatures on Titan, it should condense as a liquid, or as ethane snow at higher latitudes where it is colder.  Extrapolating the current ethane production rate for the assumed age of the solar system (4.5 billion years) should have yielded deep oceans of ethane at least 300 meters deep, but probably much deeper if methane were more abundant in the past, as is commonly believed.The problem vanishes when you liberate your mind from the requirement of billions of years.  This is really uncanny.  Everything about Titan screams young, but nowhere do you find anyone questioning the linchpin assumption that Titan is 4.5 billion years old.  It’s almost like they want to downplay this “puzzle” and sweep it under the rug.  Don’t let them.  Most creationists could live with a young or old Titan, though some would prefer the former.  The only people who would be completely scandalized by a young Titan are the evolutionists who absolutely depend on billions of years in which to hide their skeletons.    The ethane cloud is too little, too late.  After all, vast quantities of ethane must be there.  Dr. Flasar admitted it: he was reassured that the ethane “condensation does occur” and that the basic ideas about Titan’s chemistry have been validated.  It follows logically that this process, going on interrupted for billions of years, would leave the evidence in abundance.  OK, so where is it?  They can’t hide the answer in the future much longer.  Imagine the entire globe covered with an ethane ocean half a mile deep or more.  What happened to it?  Did the interior suck it up like a sponge?  Did aliens take it?  Did creationists steal in a vast conspiracy to support their young-earth views?  Come on; let the facts speak to the unbiased mind.(Visited 31 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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May the Weak Force Be With You

first_imgWe couldn’t live without the weak force, the least understood and underappreciated natural force.David Armstrong wants to educate people about the weak force. In a press release from the College of William and Mary, Joseph McClain introduces us to the physicist who thinks people should appreciate a property of the universe without which life could not exist.Armstrong came to William & Mary in 1994. Now, as Chancellor Professor of Physics, divides his time between Small Hall and the Jefferson Lab, where he collaborates on a number of particle-physics experiments, most of which involve the weak force. When Armstrong talks about his work to people who don’t speak physics, he starts by explaining that the weak force is one of the four fundamental interactions that keep the universe running.Without the weak force, the sun and life would be impossible.“Two of them are familiar to most of us,” Armstrong said. “Gravity: it keeps the planets in orbit around the sun and keeps us affixed to the Earth. Electricity and magnetism: We’ve learned since Maxwell that they’re two aspects of the same force. We’re familiar with those, and electromagnetism is what’s responsible for the electrons staying in orbit around the nucleus. Basically, all of chemistry arises from electricity and magnetism.”Less familiar to the lay public, he said, are the two nuclear forces. The strong force holds together the protons and neutrons (and their constituent quarks) in the nucleus. The last, and least familiar, of the fundamental interactions is the weak force, responsible for certain kinds of radioactive decay.“Unlike those other interactions, I can’t give you an example of something that’s held together by the weak force,” Armstrong said. “But the weak force is incredibly important, because life wouldn’t exist without it.”How so? What has the weak force done for you lately? Well, it gives you sunlight. It also gives you medical imaging.He pointed out that the fusion process in the sun, whereby hydrogen atoms glom onto one another to become helium, is an example of the weak force in action. A critical step in that reaction chain takes place through the weak force, so in fact the weak force drives the sun’s nuclear furnace.“If the weak interaction were significantly stronger than it is, then the sun would have burned out years ago,” he said. “If the weak interaction were weaker, then the sun wouldn’t have ignited.”“Certain kinds of radioactive decay, which are often useful in things like medical imaging, take place through the weak interaction,” he explained.Physics aficionados can read more about the weak force in the article. One of the weird characteristics of the weak force, he explains, is that it violates a symmetry of nature called parity. “And, for scientists, the odd-one-out parity status of the weak force gives Armstrong and other physicists an entry point into the pursuit of new physics, beyond the Standard Model.”This implies that the “Standard Model” is not a complete account of matter and energy. So yes, young physics student, there is more to discover. The rest of us can be thankful that we have a beautiful star, the sun, giving us a remarkably constant flow of energy to the Earth.Paul wrote, “God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong” (I Corinthians 1:27). Isn’t it just like God to amaze modern physicists with something they call “weak” that turns out to be critical for life?To be dazzled by little-known facts that make life possible, read Michael Denton’s new book Children of Light. He shares the remarkable coincidences between the sun and earth that allow for the existence of large, complex creatures like humans. It almost looks designed, doesn’t it? In a podcast on ID the Future, Denton is at a loss for words to explain how astonishing the fine-tuning in the laws of physics are for our benefit.(Visited 445 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Mike Holder does not sound confident about SI story

first_imgHolder: “We’ve already notified the NCAA and they’re going to assign an investigator to this.”— Brendon (@brendon_wm) September 9, 2013 AD Mike Holder: “I don’t want to believe (the allegations) are true. … Our goal is to separate fact from fiction.” #okstate— Kelly Hines (@KellyHinesTW) September 9, 2013 Here are the statements from Mike Holder on the Sports Illustrated scandal which will (presumably) drop tonight…Holder on SI: “I know enough to be very concerned.”— Cody Stavenhagen (@CodyStavenhagen) September 9, 2013 Holder: “I apologize to all the AD’s in the conference for what’s about to be said about a member of our conference.”— Brendon (@brendon_wm) September 9, 2013 “But we hope to make you proud by how we deal with it.” (2/2)— Cody Stavenhagen (@CodyStavenhagen) September 9, 2013 Holder: “I apologize to all the AD’s in the conference for what’s about to be said about a member of our conference.”— Brendon (@brendon_wm) September 9, 2013 Holder: “It’s time to Cowboy up.”— Brendon (@brendon_wm) September 9, 2013That last one is cringe-worthy but man, what a series of statements.Maybe he’s taking the “set your expectations really, really, really low and maybe we won’t look as bad by comparison!” angle but this is not a good look.One thing that nobody has talked much about but a reader named Brian mentioned in the comments section today was that Holder is probably terrified of what Boone’s thinking right now. This quote came from a CBS Sports story in 2011:“He [Pickens] has made it very clear to us,” Holder said. “If we want to lose our No. 1 supporter, then start breaking the rules.”This after Holder noted that Boone had disassociated himself from the OSU football program for a decade after the Hart Lee Dykes stuff in the late 80s.Boone’s your boy…until he’s not, and while I don’t think this is something he would bail the program on, Holder probably doesn’t want to take any chances. Boone doesn’t like getting embarrassed and nothing is more embarrassing than funding a football program that was running dirty the entire time.Stay tuned.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Australia claim Women’s and Trans Tasman Series Trophy

first_imgIt was lights, camera and action for the Women’s Open opening the television coverage on Saturday night. The stars of both teams came out to play in front of a healthy WIN Stadium crowd. Frankie Mortimer took over the captaincy with Leana Hoani struggling with a hamstring injury and New Zealand were dealt a further blow when Roxanne Winder scored the opening touchdown.New Zealand hit back with a long range effort from Carla Hohepa who outsprinted Australia’s cover defence to score.Kelly Woods continued the good form she showed in Game One to score a touchdown as the Aussies went into half time 2-1.In the second half it was the Winchester Sisters show with Claire scoring first, Louise second and the final touchdown of the night with a huge left foot step.Rebecca scored a well deserved touchdown but the World Champion Australians won the second game 5-2 and claim the series.last_img read more

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8th Edition Rules Update

first_imgIn January 2019 the Touch Football Australia (TFA) membership were advised of a review of the 7th Edition Playing Rules which was being undertaken by TFA.TFA has identified a further review is necessary to make slight alterations to the proposed 8th Edition Rules. The intention is to introduce the new rules into all competitions as of 1 January 2020. This will allow the update of all educational resources required for the effective roll out of the 8th Edition TFA Playing Rules.Please note that until such time as these rules have been endorsed and adequate education implemented, they should not be adopted into competitions and/or events unless approved by TFA.If you would like to seek permission to trial the proposed 8th Edition Playing Rules, please contact James Sharp via email at [email protected] more here.last_img read more

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a month agoKieran Tierney thanks fans after winning Arsenal debut

first_imgKieran Tierney thanks fans after winning Arsenal debutby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveKieran Tierney was delighted with a winning Arsenal debut against Carabao Cup opponents Nottingham Forest.Tierney signed for Arsenal from Celtic during the summer transfer window, but had been suffering from a groin problem since May.The Gunners were not put off by those issues given that the 22-year-old is seen as a long-term solution at left-back, and Tierney was named in Unai Emery’s starting lineup for the first time in Tuesday night’s Carabao Cup tie against Nottingham Forest at the Emirates.Tierney was afforded a warm welcome by the Arsenal fans in north London, and his debut was a strong one as the Gunners eased to a 5-0 victory over Forest.Later, Tierney wrote: “Thank you so much for all your support… very grateful. Great feeling making my debut!”Thank you so much for all your support… very grateful. Great feeling making my debut! @Arsenalpic.twitter.com/GrHSLhTNNl— Kieran Tierney (@kierantierney1) September 24, 2019 About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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a month agoMoussa Sissoko delighted with new Spurs deal

first_imgMoussa Sissoko delighted with new Spurs dealby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham midfielder Moussa Sissoko is delighted with his new deal.He has signed a new contract with the club until 2023.The Frenchman arrived in north London in the summer of 2016 and has developed into a key player under Mauricio Pochettino.Sissoko said: “I’m very proud to sign a new deal with the club – that means the club believes in me and they’re happy with what I’m doing.”Hopefully I can give my best to the club for a long time and hopefully we can get some trophies all together.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Michael Hartfield jumps his way into Ohio State track and field lore

After 77 years, Jesse Owens, the former Ohio State track star and the man who thumbed his nose at Adolf Hitler and the idea of “Aryan Dominance” at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by winning four gold medals, has been supplanted in OSU outdoor long jumping lore. Redshirt senior Michael Hartfield set the new OSU record on March 29 at the 86th Clyde Littlefield Texas Relays in Austin, Texas, with a personal-best jump of 8.15 meters (26-9.00), edging Owens’ mark of 8.13 meters (26-8.25) set in 1936. “That accomplishment was the biggest one I’ve done,” Hartfield said. “To break a legend’s record, he’s one of the greatest athletes of all time … and it’s been really awesome to put it all together my senior year and break that record which has been my goal since I got here.” Hartfield has been one of the most decorated athletes in OSU track history, garnering three second team All-American honors in the long jump, five All-Big Ten selections for the long and triple jumps and earning the titles of 2011 Big Ten Field Athlete of the Year and the 2011 U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association Great Lakes Outdoor Field Athlete of the Year. On Wednesday, Hartfield was also named Big Ten Field Athlete of the Week, his second time earning the honor this season and the fourth time in his career. His performance at the Jim Click Shootout Saturday, where he earned first-place with a mark of 8.10 meters (26-7.00) in the long jump and first-place in the triple jump with a 15.84 meters (51-11.75) mark, garnered him the honor. But even with all of the accolades and breaking Owens’ record, Hartfield said he isn’t done just yet. “I’m going to keep pushing for another record, try and push a world record,” Hartfield said. “You never know, I just gotta keep working hard and keep pushing the limits and see where it takes you.” The current long jump world record is 8.95 meters, set by Mike Powell from the U.S. in 1991. His jumps coach, Brian Brillon, said when he first met Hartfield, he saw potential for him to break Owens’ record. “When I first met him and we first did some drills, Mike just had that ‘it’ factor,” Brillon said. “And you know when you see ‘it.’ Each year he’s been progressing, and he’s one of those guys determined to get better. He’s a blessing to coach.” Hartfield is already looking ahead to the 2013 Big Ten Outdoor Track Championships, which are set to be held at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium on May 10. He said he has a goal to win a conference title as a senior on the Buckeyes’ home track. “I want to help the team toward a Big Ten Championship, that’s still the goal,” Hartfield said. “Let’s try and get a championship … let’s just keep pushing to get better, that’s basically the team goal always.” Brillon said Hartfield’s work ethic doesn’t just inspire the team, but also his coaches. Brillon said Hartfield’s leadership might be his biggest asset. “I think (Mike’s) helped all of us get better,” Brillon said. “He’s helped me be a better coach, he’s helped the other athletes be better just having him on the team, and he brings an atmosphere of competitiveness and excellence.” Hartfield’s jumping career won’t end once he removes the Scarlet and Gray track suit. Hartfield said his personal goals stretch far beyond the confines of the aptly named Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. “I plan to go on the pro circuit and to try and make the world team,” Hartfield said. “Everyone wants to be an Olympian, that’s the peak. I want to make the Olympic team and say I’m an Olympian.” Hartfield and OSU’s next home meet is the Jesse Owens Track Classic, which is scheduled to begin April 19 at 4 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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