Student loan bill takes first steps

first_imgStudent loan bill takes first steps Student loan bill takes first steps March 15, 2005 Regular Newscenter_img A bill that would allow the state to repay student loans for some of its long-term attorneys has cleared its first hurdle.SB 190, which would allow the state to repay up to $44,000 on student loans for assistant public defenders, assistant state attorneys, assistant attorneys general, and assistant statewide prosecutors cleared the Senate Governmental Oversight and Productivity Committee on February 23. It was approved by a 5-0 vote after three minor amendments were added.It has already cleared the Senate Judiciary in January, and next goes to the Justice Appropriations Committee.The bill allows the state to repay up to $3,000 a year for student loans for attorneys in the four job categories who have been on the job for at least three years. After six years, the payment goes up to $5,000 a year, with a maximum repayment of $44,000.According to information provided to the committee, the average first year assistant state attorney makes $41,554.84; the first year assistant public defender earns $42.410.18; and the assistant attorney general $39,311 (figures were not available for assistant statewide prosecutors). After three years, those salaries are typically $51,108.36, $51,282.48, and $47,313, respectively.For those with law school loan debt, those who graduated from public law schools have an average debt of $54,025 and those from private schools typically owe $77,183.The three amendments provide that the loans must not be in default or have accrued late fees; the applying attorney must annually submit an affidavit of certification; and if an eligible attorney has more than one loan, the payments will first be applied to the loan with the highest interest rate.Bill supporters have argued the loan repayment program is justified because public attorneys typically make less than those entering private practice. State attorneys and public defenders have said the measure could help them retain experienced staff, who often leave for private practice because of the onus of repaying student loans.A similar measure, HB 169, has been filed and referred to the Judiciary Committee, the Justice Appropriations Committee, and the Justice Council. As this News went to press, it had not been heard. HB 169 provides for the loan repayments for assistant state attorneys, assistant public defenders, and qualified trial court staff attorneys.The Bar’s Young Lawyers Division has taken a legislative position supporting loan repayments for experienced government attorneys, at the local, state, and federal level, and including legal aid attorneys.last_img read more

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Biden’s Economic Plan for the Virus

first_img– Advertisement – Biden warns of fatal consequences as Trump stonewalls on the transition, and Whitmer faces more blowback over the restrictions in Michigan. It’s Tuesday, and this is your politics tip sheet. Sign up here to get On Politics in your inbox every weekday. Biden and Harris speaking about the economic recovery in Wilmington, Del., yesterday.Will Trump face federal prosecution?- Advertisement – Trump is already the subject of multiple investigations in New York stemming from his private business conduct: a criminal inquiry by the district attorney of Manhattan, and a civil investigation by the attorney general of New York State.Yet there could be more, as our reporter Jonathan Mahler writes in a new article for The Times Magazine that seeks to answer the question of just how legally vulnerable Trump will be once he leaves the White House. Potentially criminal activity has unfolded throughout Trump’s term, Jonathan writes, and the only way to hold him legally accountable for things he did as president would be through federal prosecution.Precedent points to leniency here: Gerald Ford pardoned Richard Nixon in 1974, citing a need for national healing. Biden’s old boss, Obama, declined to prosecute former George W. Bush administration officials for authorizing the unlawful torture of detainees. But Trump’s case feels different.- Advertisement – On Politics is also available as a newsletter. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox.Is there anything you think we’re missing? Anything you want to see more of? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at [email protected]center_img One of Trump’s lawyers argued in court last year that the president was immune from prosecution throughout his term in office.Could the president, an appeals court judge asked, shoot somebody on Fifth Avenue and get away with it, as he had talked on the campaign trail about doing? “That is correct,” the president’s lawyer, William Consovoy, replied.It was a bold claim — and one that few legal scholars have endorsed. But what about after Trump leaves office? What’s to stop him from being prosecuted then? “Every president seeks to exploit the immense power of the office, but Trump’s exploitation of this power represented a difference in both degree and kind,” Jonathan writes. “Trump stretched the limits of his authority not just to enrich himself and his family but to block investigations into his personal and official conduct and to maintain his grip on power.”Prosecuting a former president — especially one who just received the second-most popular votes in United States history, and who continues to command the support of a devoted following — would be a complicated and risky gambit. You can read the full article, or listen to a narrated audio version of it, at this link.New York Times EventsJoin DealBook for conversations with Anthony Fauci and Elizabeth Warren.Today DealBook is holding its first Online Summit. Join us at 11 a.m. Eastern for a conversation with Dr. Anthony Fauci as he discusses the latest developments in the pandemic and reflects on his service under six presidents. And at 4:30 p.m. Eastern, Senator Elizabeth Warren will discuss the postelection outlook for politics and policy.Watch free from anywhere in the world. Register now. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Wiggins lifts Timberwolves past Pelicans

first_imgNew Orleans was led by Jrue Holiday, who finished with 27 points. Cousins added 17.Trailing 93-76 at the beginning of the fourth quarter, New Orleans would get as close as 98-88 on a 3-pointer by Holiday with 8:19 left, but the Timberwolves responded by scoring the next six points to push the advantage to 104-88.New Orleans (11-10) started the game hot, opening on a 10-2 run. Two free throws by Wiggins with 1:06 left in the opening quarter tied the game 26-26 and a bucket by Crawford cut the lead to 29-28 at the end of the quarter.Dieng’s 3-pointer to open the second quarter gave Minnesota the lead for good at 31-29 with 11:30 in the first half.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “I actually thought I was in rhythm at the start of the game because we were coming off a tough game,” he said. “We were down a little bit physically early at times, but to this team’s credit we fought through it. When you are playing back-to-back games you are going to have people that are sore and tired. We needed this win. Where we want this team to go in the future, we can’t afford to lose two games in a row.”Jimmy Butler and Gorgui Dieng had 19 points each for the Timberwolves (13-9).FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“I thought our guys were ready to go tonight,” Timberwolves coach Tom Thibodeau said. “We brought the right mindset to come in and win the ballgame. I thought they played tough and shared the ball well. When you play for each other good things are going to happen.”The turning point of the game came midway through the second quarter. With Minnesota leading 45-43, Davis was called for a technical foul. Fifteen seconds later he picked up his second tech and was ejected for the first time in his six-year NBA career. Minnesota responded by finishing the half on a 17-6 run to take a 62-49 lead into the halftime locker room. View comments Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Curry comes through in OT, Warriors outlast Lakers “That play was a hard play to officiate,” Thibodeau said. “Because of the size of DeMarcus, Anthony and Karl-Anthony Towns. It can get pretty physical in there. You can probably call a foul on any play when those guys are matched up against each other.”Davis finished with 17 points and five rebounds.“You could feel the momentum shift (after Davis was tossed),” Wiggins said. “It helped ignite a big run that we were able to outscore them.”Davis’ teammate DeMarcus Cousins was frustrated with the call after the game.“‘It’s obvious, man,” he said. “It’s a joke. It’s a complete joke. What I don’t understand is that players are punished for playing off emotion or showing their emotion… but other people are allowed to and it’s totally fine.”ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson LATEST STORIES NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana—Andrew Wiggins wouldn’t let fatigue from consecutive games be an excuse for a poor effort by his Minnesota teammates. So he did something about it.Wiggins scored 28 points to help the Timberwolves beat New Orleans 120-102 on Wednesday night in a game that saw Pelicans forward Anthony Davis ejected for the first time in his career.ADVERTISEMENT Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set MOST READlast_img read more

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Niece breaks down on stand, recalls identifying body

first_imgTaxi driver’s murderAnastasia Persaud, the niece of murdered Pegasus Hotel taxi driver Rubranauth Jeeboo, testified before Justice Brassington Reynolds as the Lorenzo Forde murder trial continued at the High Court in Georgetown.Persaud, who had to take a few moments to compose herself during her testimony, told the court that at the time of her uncle’s December 2013 killing, she resided with him and other relatives at their Lot 215 Delph Street, Campbellville, Georgetown home.Accused: Lorenzo FordeOn Wednesday, the witness confirmed that her uncle had 2 Toyota model yellow cars – a Carina and an Allion. She told the court that he used the Carina to drive to work around the time of his demise, and the Allion was parked in the Pegasus compound. The witness told the court that Jeeboo used both cars to ply his trade as a taxi driver. She also noted that his working hours were irregular and dependent on requests from the hotel and customers.Jeeboo’s niece further indicated that she and other family members would call her uncle via telephone every three hours.The jury heard that at about 08:15 hrs on December 27, 2013, while at home, she saw her uncle getting ready to leave the residence for work, wearing a light blue shirt jack, dark blue pants, a pair of black socks and black shoes. She also recalled that on December 28 at 03:45h, she was at home with her mother and other relatives when she called her uncle, but his phone was off.“I called the hotel and spoke to two of his colleagues, but got no positive response,” Persaud indicated. She told the court that after making further calls to his colleagues at the airport, she became anxious and worried.The witness said that between the pre-dawn and the early daylight hours, she and her mother checked various hospitals to see if the taxi driver was involved in an accident.“When I got home I saw three gentlemen, who introduced themselves as Police officers,” she noted.The court heard that she later accompanied the Policemen to the Lyken Funeral Home, where she identified her uncle’s body.In tears, Persaud also recalled seeing her uncle’s clothes torn, with blood on his shirt jack and one side shoe missing. The witness broke down, and was offered some moments to compose herself before continuing her testimony, when she later noted that she identified her uncle’s Allion motorcar, which contained black dust on it and the taxi service logo was torn off.Also testifying on Wednesday was Government Pathologist Dr Nehaul Singh.The Pegasus Hotel taxi driver was found in a heap of garbage at Caneview Avenue, South Ruimveldt, Georgetown. The accused, Lorenzo Forde, was just 18 when he was charged with the taxi driver’s murder. The Prosecution contends that between December 27 and 28, 2013, he murdered Jeeboo in the course or furtherance of a robbery.Forde is represented by attorneys Hewley Griffith and Rachael Bakker, while State counsels Lisa Cave, Shawnette Austin and Tiffini Lyken are presenting the prosecution’s case.last_img read more

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Darwinists Refute ID “Irreducible Complexity” Argument

first_img“New book explains how evolution really works, rebuts intelligent design.”  That’s the triumphant title of a new book announcement from Harvard Medical School, reported on EurekAlert.  According to the release, Marc W. Kirschner (Harvard Medical School) and John C. Gerhart (UC Berkeley) have addressed a “key problem in evolutionary theory that has puzzled scientists from Darwin on and which is now under intense scrutiny by proponents of intelligent design: where do the big jumps come from in evolution?” (emphasis added in all quotes.)  The product of their investigation is their new book The Plausibility of Life: Resolving Darwin’s Dilemma (Yale Univ. Press, 2005).  The answer, they claim, lies in newly-discovered molecular properties of organisms:The origin of novelty, the development of new arrangements of interlocking parts that some call “irreducibly complex,” can only be understood in the light of the last 20 years of research in cell biology and development.    We now know that the ‘parts’ that make up a living organism are very unlike the rigid parts designed for machines.  Instead, they can flexibly connect and re-connect, using the same pieces over and over to make new functions.    For example, one might think that a mutation that makes the neck of a giraffe longer would have to be accompanied by several other mutations, one that expands the length of the muscles of the neck, another that makes the blood vessels longer, and so on.  But instead, the muscles grow to fit the length of the bone and the blood vessels grow until all the muscles have a sufficient supply of oxygen.  Apparently very complex adaptations can therefore be achieved with few, simple mutations.    Today, it is understood for the first time that all animals use the same set of core processes to develop into adult forms.  Applying this knowledge to evolution, the authors show that novel traits emerge from the ways the organism is constructed: its complex mechanisms for adapting to the environment, its modular construction, and its internal circuitry that can be re-specified and reconnected.At first glance this sounds very Lamarckian, so let’s examine a book review by another evolutionist who published his remarks in the journal Cell.1  Douglas Erwin of the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC was not all that impressed with their arguments.  In fact, he thinks the authors didn’t to their homework researching the abundant literature on the subject.  He did, however, appreciate the magnitude of the problem the book tried to address:The diversity and complexity of life on Earth—from bacteria and fungi to plants and animals—suggest the generation of remarkable variation upon which natural selection can act.  But how do new traits—new morphological architectures (bodyplans), developmental processes, and behaviors—arise?  Did the vertebrate brain and neural crest arise through processes that are different from those that generated new hairs on the legs of the fruit fly?  Can major evolutionary transitions in the history of life be explained by random variation—variation that is random with respect to the future needs of the organism—filtered through the process of natural selection?  These questions are not new, but the promise of a more mechanistic basis for answering them through comparative developmental biology imbues them with a fresh urgency.Erwin summarizes their argument: animals have evolved to evolve.  Variations acted on by natural selection have produced “phenotypic plasticity” or evolvability – they ability to adapt to changing environments (see 08/04/2004 entry on this idea).In Kirschner and Gerhart’s view, there are four aspects of gene regulation and development in animals that constrain the direction of heritable variation.  These are the extensive conservation across metazoa of certain regulatory patterns; a modular pattern of organismal design; what the authors term “weak linkages” in gene regulation, caused by, in their view, regulatory interactions that do not specify outcomes; and nondeterministic outcomes of development.To Erwin, what they are saying is, “natural selection needs some help.”  He denies it.  Natural selection can get along just fine without “random genetic variation that is biased toward viability, functional utility, and relevance to environmental conditions.”  He thinks that Kirschner and Gerhart don’t understand what random means:This is the first place where the authors get into trouble; for through much of the book they seem to fundamentally misunderstand how evolutionary biologists use the term “random.”  By random mutation, evolutionary biologists mean random with respect to the adaptive needs of the organism, not, as the authors would have it in the early part of the book, completely random in the sense that many nonevolutionary biologists may think of the word “random.”  One of Charles Darwin’s key insights was that the combination of undirected mutation and natural selection is a powerful positive force for evolutionary creativity (and not, as so many later biologists have suggested, merely a negative force).  Evolutionary biologists have long understood that the nature of variation depends critically on what has already evolved.  Indeed, there is a rich literature discussing how phylogeny, function, structure, and other features constrain evolutionary variation.  Kirschner and Gerhart ignore this uncomfortable fact, dismissing constraint as “a minor effect, or trivial, for example, in explaining why mollusks (sic) and echinoderms were less able to evolve wings than vertebrates.”  They refer to variation as random alterations that can have little positive impact or that “lead to catastrophic failure.”  This results in the appearance of some odd comments as, for example, when the authors claim that evolutionary biologists “do not commonly appreciate…”  that “present-day organisms come from previous organisms.”  Indeed.Want to meet a few?  he asks in effect.  He accuses them of a “limited view of the evolutionary literature” on the subject which “undercuts most of their own arguments” in favor of “facilitated variation.”    Erwin puts this new book into a new genre of books finding the current model of evolution incomplete.  Most other authors, however, have had the good sense not to proclaim a “major new scientific theory” or “an original, far-reaching recasting of evolutionary theory,” as these do in their Preface.  Erwin mentions several books that do a better job attempting to “solve problems of evolutionary innovation that remain unresolved by the Modern Synthesis, the reigning paradigm of evolution developed in the 1940s by Mayr, Simpson, Wright, Haldane, Dozhansky, Fischer, and others.”  He is not sure, though, that any combination of these books amounts to a revision of the Modern Synthesis.    Looking at the thesis of the book in more detail, Erwin cuts to the chase.  He says that Kirschner and Gerhart don’t recognize the effect of environment on variation. Presenting no evidence, they claim that these waves of innovation are not linked to changes in the physical environment.  In fact, one of the most exciting areas of current research addresses how the origin and spread of these innovations are linked to a variety of geochemical, climatic, and other changes.  These core processes—DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, formation of the cytoskeleton, and limb patterning—have descended relatively unchanged since they first arose.Erwin does agree with them on one point: “most evolution within the Animal Kingdom since the Cambrian radiation of metazoans involved the carefully regulated deployment of these core processes,” and that environmental conditions can become a “rich source of new phenotypes” that can become “developmentally integrated and viable.”  For instance, mutations might exhibit “exploratory behavior” and the most useful will become stabilized:Kirschner and Gerhart invoke exploratory behavior as a means of avoiding what they view as an otherwise insurmountable difficulty: that novelty appears to require multiple, correlated changes from phenotype to function.Does a bacterial flagellum come to mind here?  Erwin also likes their “wonderful and most appropriate” term for the compartmentalization of network modules: “invisible anatomy.”  Here he praises the book:The most important part of this book is, in my view, the authors’ description of the evolutionary significance of the interactions between compartments and the conserved regulatory networks that underlie them via weak linkages [i.e., signals that trigger a response without specifying information about what the response should be].  Although the authors do not emphasize this sufficiently (at least for a paleontologist), this network of relationships imposes a developmental reality to the architectural forms described as body plans and generally characterized within Linnean systematics as phyla and classes.  As Kirschner and Gerhart note, this modularity of design often allows relatively independent evolution of different body parts without greatly increasing the coordination among them.  The gills, paddles, mouthparts, claws, and walking legs of various arthropods are all modifications of a single ancestral structure.  The modularity of arthropod body plans has enabled the rapid adaptation of limbs without inhibiting the workings of the whole animal.Now, to the “troubling” parts of the book.  Erwin is glad they have tackled “one of the most challenging issues in evolution,” and appreciates their insights as far as they go and as incomplete as their theory is.  But he criticizes the lack of justification and depth of detail that “leave far too much to the imagination of the reader.”  The book, therefore, “feels more like a vision of where the field should go rather than a thoroughly constructed theory of the origins of phenotypic novelty.”    To their credit, Kirschner and Gerhart tackle the problem of phenotypic novelty more forthrightly than other “revisionist” books like those of the late Stephen Jay Gould.  This leads Erwin to list some of the outstanding problems.  Some seem strong enough to make one wonder if evolutionary theory has ever really addressed the core questions Charles Darwin set out to solve:The generation of morphological variants is a critical issue, and several of these book authors have raised important questions and proposed new viewpoints.  But the generation of variation is only the beginning of the problem of evolutionary novelty.  Novel phenotypes succeed or fail based on their ecological relationships with other organisms and with the physical environment.  This ecological dimension is conspicuously lacking in these books, yet we cannot really understand novelty without it.  In particular, evolutionary biologists need to address such issues as how phenotypic “space” expands, how new niches are constructed, and related ecological events.One thing Erwin is sure of: in spite of all these fundamental issues challenging evolutionary theory, no one outside the Darwinian camp need apply:Is the neo-Darwinian view of evolution in need of reformation?  Certainly the diversity of rumblings indicates some degree of unhappiness, but evolutionary biologists have regularly published new models of evolution since the late 19th century (see Bowler, The Eclipse of Darwinism, Johns Hopkins, 1993).  Is there reason to think that our view of evolution needs to change?  The answer is almost certainly yes, although not, as the purveyors of creationism/intelligent design would have it, because the reality of evolution is under question.  Rather, we need to revise our view of evolution to reflect a more detailed understanding of how genetics and development both allow and facilitate phenotypic variation, to take into account the temporal dynamics of changes in the environment, and to incorporate the likelihood that there is selection and feedback at multiple levels (cell, tissue, organism, clade).  The central issues that need to be incorporated into evolutionary theory are the origin of phenotypic novelty and the discontinuous patterns of appearance of new phenotypes.Now wait – wasn’t that EurekAlert said that this book solves, putting to rest the claims of the intelligent design movement?  At the end of Erwin’s book review, is he still at square one?  He dismisses The Plausibility of Life as an “entertaining read” of only “introductory” value into recent trends in evolutionary theory.  In sum, it contains a lot of sound and fury, signifying little: “But with its sometimes troubling limitations, the book falls short of the major new theory that the authors promise in their introduction.”1Douglas H. Erwin, “A Variable Look at Evolution,” Cell, Volume 123, Issue 2, 21 October 2005, Pages 177-179, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2005.10.003.If you get a kick out of watching villains shoot themselves in the foot, you will rollick with this entry.  We provided extended quotes to let you savor the moment.  Here is the biggest problem in the history of evolutionary thought: the abrupt appearance of new body plans and complex structures with interrelated parts each necessary for function.  The Darwinists realize that the creationists and intelligent design proponents have been hammering them on the fact that they have no answers.  And finally, here was the new book that EurekAlert said was going to put those criticisms to rest once for all.  And what is it?  Blind search!  “Exploratory behavior” is putting feelers out in the dark and seeing if anything sticks.  But then what is leading the blind: the blind random variations in the molecules, or the blind random variations in the environment?  Can anyone really believe that a succession of blind actions will produce irreducibly complex systems like wings, gills, paddles, mouthparts, claws, legs, and rotating motors of exquisite design and efficiency?  If this book had the answer, Erwin would not have left it (“the origin of phenotypic novelty”) and “the discontinuous patterns of appearance” (e.g., the Cambrian Explosion), as unsolved problems.  Then Erwin did us the favor of pointing out that all the other books don’t solve them, either – though they have been trying since the 19th century.  [Quiz question: in what century did Charles Darwin write his famous book?]    If you found anything other than smoke and mirrors in all the mumbo-jumbo they came up with, go ahead and put your money in Darwin Circus stock.  That’s where the magicians have mastered the art of mass hypnosis, pointing their fingers into the air and and saying “watch this space” (e.g., 08/19/2004) till everyone is staring, mind-numbed, at nothing.  That’s where the clowns, wearing pink-tassled slippers and conical hats (see 04/01/2005) end their long comedy of errors act by shooting each other’s feet simultaneously.  One of their lines is starting to go over like a lead balloon, though.  That’s when they say the real clowns are the ones across the street at Philharmonic Hall, listening with soaring hearts and minds as the Maestro conducts hundreds of skilled players and singers in his masterpiece, The Creation.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Online mag launched for SA rugby fans

first_img9 May 2014 The South African Rugby Union (Saru) launched a new digital magazine titled “Springbok” on Friday. The website utilises social media to reach out to fans of South African rugby. “Springbok” is free online at http://www.springbokmagazine.com and will be distributed through Saru’s existing and social media channels on Facebook and Twitter, as well as via e-mail to all members of the Springbok Supporters’ Club. This means more than 1-million online fans of South African rugby will have direct access to the new magazine, with the sharing component of social media making the possible footprint of the magazine much larger.‘We are constantly looking at improving’ “We are constantly looking at improving the way we interact with supporters of the Springboks and our other national teams,” Saru CEO Jurie Roux said in a statement. “I am sure the magazine will bring supporters even closer to their heroes and rising stars in our national teams, as well as into other Saru activities, such as our very successful museum, The Springbok Experience, the Cell C Community Cup and the work of our High Performance and development departments,” he added.First issue The first issue contains an interview with Springbok coach Heyneke Meyer, where he looks ahead to the forthcoming test season, as well as features on the Junior Springboks, the Springbok Sevens and Women’s teams, the Springbok Experience, and a look back at the second edition of the Cell C Community Cup. “Springbok” will be released on the first Friday of every month and its back-end technology means it loads quickly and is small in data size. Because of the page design it is not formatted for smartphones. However, regular updates will be posted on Facebook (Springboks) and Twitter (@bokrugby). SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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CAUV still part of budget talks

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As state budget negotiators enter the final days of House-Senate budget talks, the Ohio Farmers Union reminds legislators that CAUV reforms contained in both versions of the budget are desperately needed and overdue.“We’ve been fighting for some meaningful changes in the CAUV formula since around 2012,” said Joe Logan, OFU President . “It’s been a long haul, and along the way farmland property taxes have increased 300 percent or more for family farmers in every corner of Ohio.”Logan points out that while farmland property taxes have skyrocketed, other small businesses in Ohio have seen large tax breaks.“Family farms, which have struggled to generate income in an era of low commodity prices, are perhaps the only small business category that have been taxed more while others’ taxes have decreased over the past three state budgets,” Logan said.CAUV, or Current Agricultural Use Valuation, is the way farmland property tax values are determined.last_img read more

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NSWCHS win girls’ National Youth Championships crown

first_imgThere are plenty of ways to keep up-to-date with all of the latest results, news and information from the 2014 National Youth Championships (NYC). The Touch Football Australia and NYC websites will be updated regularly throughout the event with all of the latest information and can be found by clicking on the links below: www.nyc.mytouchfooty.com www.touchfootball.com.au All of Touch Football Australia’s social media pages will be regularly updated throughout the NYC event, so be sure to ‘like’ and ‘follow’ us by clicking on the links below. Facebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia Twitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (be sure to use the hashtag #nationalyouthchamps) Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustralia (be sure to use the hashtag #nationalyouthchamps) The TFA YouTube channel will also have highlights and game live streamed throughout the event. Please click on the link below to be taken to the channel, and be sure to become a subscriber to the channel – www.youtube.com/touchfootballausRelated LinksNYC girls final By BEN HARRIS New South Wales Combined High Schools won their first National Youth Championships girls title since 2011 and their fifth overall when they defeated Queensland Secondary Schools Touch 4-3 in the final on Saturday afternoon.NSWCHS got out of the blocks in sensational style, scoring two touchdowns to Bailey Toleafoa and Shannon Rose in the opening minutes.QSST scored midway through the first half to make it 2-1, which remained the score until half-time.In an entertaining match that went end-to-end, superb attacking and defensive skills were on show.Kirra Dibb scored for NSWCHS to make it 3-1 but QSST scored in their next set through Emma Sykes.Another touchdown by Taryn Love again put NSWCHS up by two touchdowns.But when Tamika Upton scored for QSST with 10 minutes to go, the match was on a knife’s edge.It remained that way for the rest of the game but NSWCHS were able to hold on to claim the championship with a 4-3 victory.NEW SOUTH WALES COMBINED HIGH SCHOOLS 4 (Bailey Toleafoa, Shannon Rose, Kirra Dibb, Taryn Love touchdowns) def QUEENS;AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS TOUCH 3 (Emma Sykes, Tamika Upton, Tanielle Larkin touchdowns). HT: NSWCHS 2-1.last_img read more

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10 months agoBologna coach Inzaghi: Emotional facing Ancelotti

first_imgBologna coach Inzaghi: Emotional facing Ancelottiby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBologna coach Filippo Inzaghi is looking forward to facing Carlo Ancelotti’s Napoli.Inzaghi played for Ancelotti at AC Milan.”Facing Carlo will be really emotional,” Inzaghi said in his pre-match Press conference.“He’s a great man and we have a strong and emotional bond. We’ve always had a wonderful relationship.“However, I hope I can make him feel sad, after all the joy I brought him throughout my career…” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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a month agoMoussa Sissoko delighted with new Spurs deal

first_imgMoussa Sissoko delighted with new Spurs dealby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham midfielder Moussa Sissoko is delighted with his new deal.He has signed a new contract with the club until 2023.The Frenchman arrived in north London in the summer of 2016 and has developed into a key player under Mauricio Pochettino.Sissoko said: “I’m very proud to sign a new deal with the club – that means the club believes in me and they’re happy with what I’m doing.”Hopefully I can give my best to the club for a long time and hopefully we can get some trophies all together.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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