Watch A Free Webcast Of Trey Anastasio And The Rest Of The Sets At Levitate Music & Arts Festival

first_imgThe Levitate Music & Arts Festival Live Stream is up an running, playing free webcasts of each of the festival’s sets as they happen. In addition to performances by Ripe, Twiddle, Robert Randolph and the Family Band, Slightly Stoopid, and Stick Figure, Trey Anastasio Trio + Ray Paczkowski will headline today’s festivities to close out a weekend run with Russ Lawton, Tony Markellis, and the newly recovered Paczkowski after stops in Charlottesville on Thursday and at New York’s Central Park on Friday. Tonight is the last Trey solo band stop on the schedule before he links back up with Phish for their summer tour beginning July 17th in Tahoe.Thanks to Levitate Music & Arts Festival’s live stream, you can catch the last show of the run from wherever you happen to be when they hit. Trey Anastasio and company take the stage at 8pm.EXCLUSIVE: Levitate Founder Dan Hassett Talks Good Music, Sustainability, & Community Levitate Music Festival 2018 Live Stream[Video: ineffablemusicgroup]Tomorrow, the live stream gets started early with a 1:30pm set by Stephen Marley, followed by Spafford at 2:15, Lake Street Dive at 3:45, Turkuaz at 4:15, West End Blend at 5:15, Rebelution at 5:30, Greensky Bluegrass at 6:15, Mihali & Frends at 7:30, and The Head and the Heart at 7:45. You can check out the full weekend live stream schedule for Levitate Music & Arts Festival below.last_img read more

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Innovation assignment

first_imgTyler Hester cried into a stack of buttermilk pancakes at an IHOP in Pasadena, Calif.It was two months into his teaching career, and he was already feeling overwhelmed and ineffective. “I’ll never forget this,” he said, recalling the breakfast with his mother. “The pancakes had just arrived and she asked me, ‘Tyler, how are you doing?’ My eyes welled up and a tear drop literally rolled onto the pancake in front of me and I just said, ‘Mom, it’s so hard.’”A decade later, that low point led Hester, now in the final year of a doctor of education leadership program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, to an idea: create an initiative to offer struggling new teachers emotional support. The need for such a program was apparent to Hester not just because of his own experience, but because of the nation’s high rates of teacher burnout and turnover.But how to find the support and guidance to take his idea and turn it into an actual program? Hester turned to Operation Impact, a program launched last year by the Office of the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning and its Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching that supports budding entrepreneurs in education innovation.Operation Impact has funded almost 200 students working on more than 80 projects around the country and the world. Ventures have included a school readiness app for incoming kindergartners, a medical case-logging system for surgeons, a workforce training program for youth in Indonesia, a support program for adolescents living with a caregiver or family member who struggles with mental health issues or addiction, and a mobile app that helps match students and mentors.The program awards small seed grants for pilot projects, typically $200 to $500 up to four times a year, and provides access to software from its corporate sponsors that can help the groups get their projects off the ground. Limiting the size of the awards allows Operation Impact to spread the grants around more widely.“We didn’t want to just award a bunch of people,” said Jaime B. Goldstein, HILT’s director of strategic projects and innovation grants. “We wanted to teach as many people as possible the mechanisms for how you go about being a change agent [in the field of education].”The program encourages students to collaborate across disciplines and requires teams to meet with Harvard graduate students, called program fellows, who have experience in education innovation.Funded by SMART Technologies — one of Operation Impact’s corporate sponsors —the fellows understand what funders are looking for, and they help teams research the problems they are addressing, build businesses plans, grow their teams, and tap into relevant research at Harvard. They also connect teams with external experts and potential funders. Their ultimate goal is to help the groups move their projects forward, said Gorick Ng, M.B.A. ’18, a fellow from last year.“Standing between someone who has the passion, the background, and the skills and this better world they aspire to is this big mountain, this paralyzing question of what to do next. The problem is a lack of guidance, a lack of resources, a lack of community,” Ng said. “What this program offers is a structured way to help people take what is otherwise an overwhelming sense of ambiguity and nudge them into motion and help them take that next best step.”,For New Teachers Thriving, the program Hester started, Operation Impact and its fellows helped the team organize their resource allocation, develop their growth strategy, and prepare for meetings with funders and pitch competitions. In fact, Hester said participation in HILT helped the team — which includes Crystel Harris, Ed.L.D. ’21, and Akash Wasil ’19 — become finalists in two other Harvard funding competitions that support student entrepreneurs: the President’s Innovation Challenge and the Harvard Business School New Venture Competition. But what helped most of all was the confidence Operation Impact instilled in the group, Hester said.“It was a big wind in our sails to have someone say, ‘This idea is not crazy. We think there’s something here and we think you should pursue it,’” Hester said. “It was just really encouraging to get their support.”With funding this past year, the team was able to purchase food and supplies for the personal-development training they delivered to more than 50 Boston Public School teachers. This year, because of their early success, they’re reaching even more educators. Teachers in Boston are currently applying for the second version of the program and nearly 200 district teachers and administrators in Stockton, Calif., are taking part. In the future, New Teachers Thriving hopes to offer their training online so they can reach thousands of teachers across the country.While Hester’s group did well, others got even more traction. Brown Art Ink has been lifting up artists of color for the past five years in cities such as Baltimore, Cleveland, Washington, D.C., Toronto, and Mexico City by offering training and creating paid opportunities for them to show their work in museums, galleries, and other public spaces. Co-founders Amanda Figueroa, who’s earning her Ph.D. in American studies from the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Ravon Ruffin turned their $200 grant from Operation Impact into $8,000 in annual revenue.This year, Operation Impact will invite students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to collaborate, making it open not only to all Harvard students in degree-granting programs but to all MIT students, too.The move is in line with the program’s stance on collaboration. Teams must include more than one person and preferably feature members who represent different disciplines across both campuses.“You don’t solve a complicated problem like education with one field alone,” Goldstein said. “You need a business mind. You need a technology mind. You need a marketing, sales mind. You need a pedagogy mind. You need all these different skill sets.”Teams last year featured a mix of students from Harvard College, Harvard Business School, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard Extension School, GSAS, Harvard Graduate School of Design, HGSE, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard Law School, and Harvard School of Public Health. There were also many non-Harvard affiliated members.Operation Impact was designed in collaboration with HGSE, the Social Innovation and Change Initiative at HKS, the iLabs, and the HBS Social Enterprise Initiative. It works with SMART Technologies, Wix.com, Amazon Web Services (AWS) Educate, AWS EdStart, and RallyCry Ventures, which provide funding and access to software and experts.One of the driving factors for its creation was the need for increased funding in education innovation. According to research from HILT, 97 percent of students looking for funding in education innovation at Harvard weren’t getting it.“To me that was just not the message that I think we wanted to be giving students across Harvard,” Goldstein said. “In my mind, we need more students and not less students working in this problem space. We should be giving as many of them as possible the experiences to learn what it actually takes to take an idea and do something in the real world with it.”Operation Impact’s University-wide kickoff event for students seeking funding this year is Oct. 3 at the Smith Campus Center from 5 to 8 p.m. Interested students can RSVP here.last_img read more

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Smashburger to replace Burger King in LaFortune Student Center

first_imgThe 18-year reign of Burger King in LaFortune Student Center will soon come to a close.Starting next fall, a Smashburger will open in its place, Notre Dame Campus Dining, Student Government and Student Activities Facilities announced early Wednesday morning.This decision was made in response to student feedback — gathered through surveys, focus groups and Student Government’s online forum, Onward.“The student feedback we received throughout the multiple focus group sessions beginning in December of 2014 helped us collectively identify what brands fit in the retail dining portfolio,” Chris Abayasinghe, director of Campus Dining, said. “… We looked to bring in a new and exciting brand — and selected Smashburger.”The project has been in the works for the past two years, Abayasinghe said, and stemmed from student feedback asking for premium options for burgers, chicken and salads on campus.Construction on Smashburger — a national fast-food chain and serves burgers, chicken, salads, sides and milkshakes — will begin immediately following Commencement weekend this May. The restaurant’s opening date is set for the beginning of the new academic year.Junior Erica Tabor, Student Government director of communications, said administrators and student leaders considered a variety of alternative restaurants to replace Burger King.“What I am most proud of — and what I think is a good reflection of the mission of our Executive Board — is that our aim was to accurately represent and serve the student body,” she said. “I think this is a good beginning to our term and sets a precedence that we are working on improving communication between students and administration, and continuing positive change in our Notre Dame community.”In student feedback, Tabor said she noticed a significant number of students asking for new or improved campus dining options and hours.“We are extremely excited to bring Smashburger to LaFortune,” she said. “Their mission emphasizes fresh, wholesome and natural ingredients, which is moving toward a healthier option of burgers than others often offered on college campuses.”Abayasinghe said Campus Dining is planning to implement more changes and initiatives at Notre Dame in the near future.“We’re planning the North Dining Hall renovation, a number of new restaurants for the Duncan Student Center and renovations into select restaurants currently on campus,” he said.Tags: Burger King, Campus DIning, LaFortune Student Center, Onward, Smashburger, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Brazil Helps Guatemalan Army Strengthen Teaching Efforts in Humanitarian Aid, Rescue

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo August 10, 2016 The Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC) is helping the Guatemalan Army and other national rescue units assemble the first group of instructors in teaching methods and techniques for emergency and natural disaster response. The training will help improve the work of humanitarian aid and rescue units. A team of 10 service members from the Guatemalan Army’s Humanitarian and Rescue Unit (UHR, for its Spanish acronym), along with the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction, firefighters, and other national relief agencies participated in the two-week training that took place at the UHR facilities in the La Aurora Central Air Command, in Guatemala City. In an interview with Diálogo, Infantry Colonel Osman Roel Gaitán Monzón, commander of the Guatemalan Army’s UHR said, “The main objective of this first training is to prepare a group of instructors from the UHR and from the various rescue organizations to be ‘multipliers’ of direct and indirect response methods and techniques, passing along their knowledge in order to strengthen humanitarian aid and rescue efforts during emergencies.” Four members of the Brazilian Army’s Fire Department, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Roberto Sangaletti, taught various teaching methods to soldiers from the UHR and rescue personnel. The participants learned teaching and lesson planning, as well as evaluation techniques. Soldiers and rescue personnel were chosen for their experience and knowledge in rescue missions and humanitarian aid. They will share what they learned with the nine civil-affairs and humanitarian-aid detachments that are deployed in various Guatemalan Army Brigades throughout the country. The participants will be certified as instructors after passing the training course, which took place in June and continues through August and October. “This is the first opportunity we have had to become certified in teaching techniques by a foreign agency,” Col. Gaitán said. The ABC is tasked with negotiating, coordinating, executing, and supervising technical cooperation programs and projects in Brazil. According to its website, the agency contributes to training and skill development geared toward the promotion and exchange of innovative experiences and best practices between Brazil and other Latin American countries. “This type of cooperation allows us to exchange experiences and knowledge, as well as to improve our response in serving the demands of the population during natural disaster emergencies such as landslides, floods, hurricanes, and other climate-related phenomena,” said Col. Gaitán. “It will also strengthen the training method of the UHR, which instructs other Army units and government bodies, and it will strengthen bonds of friendship and cooperation with Brazil.” In contrast to other Guatemalan rescue groups, the UHR is a specialized, highly mobile Army unit with a battalion level structure, which has the capacity to operate during large-scale disasters. As a member of the Conference of Central American Armed Forces, the command also assists other countries in need of its help, according to a July 2nd, 2013 Diálogo report. Guatemala is concerned about training and equipping its various Armed Forces units to effectively react to their assigned missions. To save and protect people’s lives and reduce the effects of natural disasters, the UHR has received training and education from Brazil, the United States, Canada, Argentina, and other Central American countries. For example, UHR personnel took the Hazardous Materials Handling Course, which was taught by Arkansas National Guard members, in the facilities of the Guatemalan Army Corps of Engineers, according to a Guatemalan Ministry of Defense report. “A team of six officers from the Arkansas National Guard carried out the second phase of this training during the second week of July. A total of 35 Army officers, 20 of whom are from the UHR, were trained on the handling and storage of chemical precursors,” Col. Gaitán said. “Thanks to the professionalism of our personnel and the training we have received from partner nations, we have been able to integrate well with the various national and international government institutions, enabling us to cooperate and contribute in any emergency or assignment,” added the Colonel. Guatemala’s UHR has provided technical consulting on recovery, rehabilitation, and reconstruction of affected areas in international missions such as on April 16th in Ecuador, when a 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit the Andean nation; a search-and-rescue mission in El Salvador for those affected by Hurricane Ida in 2009; and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and mudslide in Costa Rica. According to the most recent World Risk Index, Guatemala is the fourth most vulnerable country to natural disasters. Because of its location, there are many landslides, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, for which the UHR is trained in search and rescue for various structures and in first aid, as well as in needs analysis for operation in any type of terrain and meteorological conditions, among other capabilities. “It is important to have the best-trained rescue units possible,” said Sandino Asturias, director of the Center for Guatemala Studies. “The goal for Guatemala is for all of these needed trainings to be permanently institutionalized to enhance the success of the missions assigned to the relief units.”last_img read more

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Waters vows to take up NAFCU-urged CFPB exemption for credit unions in January

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr House Financial Service Committee Ranking Member Maxine Waters, D-Calif., speaking before NAFCU’s Congressional Caucus Wednesday, said credit unions should have greater exemptions from many of CFPB’s rulemakings and that she is willing to address the issue via legislation in the next Congress if the bureau continues to resist.“I’m going to take a look at this issue in January, and if legislation is needed to clarify, I will take up that issue,” she said. “I don’t mind doing that because of who you are and the services you provide to our country.”“NAFCU thanks Ranking Member Waters for her support of credit unions’ exemption from certain CFPB rulemakings,” said NAFCU Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler. “She understands that credit unions provide a huge service to the American economy and the nation’s small businesses and that, with relief from overly burdensome rules, they could do much more.”Earlier this year, a bipartisan group of 329 members of the House signed a letter to Cordray urging him to use his Dodd-Frank authority to provide greater exemptions to credit unions from certain rulemakings. A bipartisan group of 70 senators sent a similar letter in July. continue reading »last_img read more

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Second BSE case occurred in Texas, USDA says

first_img “The source herd is now under a hold order as we identify animals of interest within the herd,” USDA Chief Veterinarian John Clifford said in a prepared statement. Investigators will look for cattle born within a year before or after the BSE-infected cow and any of the cow’s offspring born within the past 2 years, he explained. The AP report said Champion Pet Food is under contract to take samples from animals in poor health. The company’s owner, Benjy Bauer, told the AP that his workers took samples from the cow and sent them to the Texas Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Texas A&M University. The lab is one of several the USDA uses to screen cattle for BSE, the story said. The USDA waited for the results of DNA tests before announcing that the infected cow came from Texas. The step was necessary because parts of the infected cow were stored with those of four other cattle, causing some uncertainty, officials said. “If the age of the animal cannot be pinpointed, then we may expand our inquiry to include all animals in this herd before the feed ban went into place in 1997,” Clifford said. To prevent BSE, the government banned putting cattle protein into cattle feed in August 1997. The FDA will also check whether firms that may have processed meat-and-bone meal from animals from that herd have complied with the 1997 feed ban, Dr. Steve Sundlof, director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, said at a news conference last night. Because of the cow’s age, the USDA suspects it became infected by eating contaminated feed before the government ban began in 1997. The USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will try to trace the source herd’s feed history, officials said. USDA press conference transcript The infected cow was incinerated, and no parts were used in human food or animal feed, according to the USDA. “The safety of our food supply is not in question,” Clifford stated.center_img See also: US Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials said the cow was to be processed at a pet food plant in Waco, Tex., when it was diverted for testing because it couldn’t walk. Officials didn’t name the plant or say exactly where the cow came from. But an Associated Press (AP) report today identified the plant as Champion Pet Food in Waco and said the cow was already dead when brought there last November. Jun 30, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The United States’ second case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was in a 12-year-old cow that came from a Texas herd and would have been made into pet food if it hadn’t been flagged for BSE testing, federal officials announced yesterday evening. An initial screening test on the Texas cow last November was inconclusive, and two confirmatory immunohistochemistry tests were negative. But early this month the USDA’s inspector general ordered a Western blot test, which came back positive. Further confirmatory tests at an international reference lab in Britain were also positive, prompting the USDA to announce the findings last week. The Texas case is the first US BSE case in a native-born animal; Clifford said the cow lived on one farm all its life. The previous US case, found in December 2003, involved a Canadian-born dairy cow in Washington state. “We felt that we had the correct herd; we wanted to identify that appropriately with DNA,” Clifford said at the news conference. Investigators analyzed DNA from the infected animal and then looked for relatives in the presumed source herd by analyzing DNA from members of the herd, he said. The investigation turned up two cattle that are related to the infected cow, he added.last_img read more

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CDC expects plentiful, on-target flu vaccine

first_imgSep 24, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Public health and medical leaders predicted today that this year’s influenza vaccine will match up well with circulating flu viruses—unlike last year’s vaccine—and that plenty of doses will be available.”We are optimistic that this year’s vaccine will be on target in protecting against the flu,” said Dr. Daniel B. Jernigan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in a news release from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID).”Last year at this time we had an indication that the vaccine might not be as effective,” Jernigan said at a press conference held today to promote flu immunization as flu season approaches. “There is no such indication this time.”CDC Director Julie Gerberding added that, on the basis of flu strains circulating in the southern hemisphere, “Right now we’re at a point where we feel very confident.”Two of the three components in last year’s vaccine—A/H3N2 and B—didn’t match well with the circulating flu strains. A preliminary study from Wisconsin showed that the H3N2 component provided 58% protection against circulating H3N2 viruses, but the B component offered no protection.Vaccine abundanceAt the news briefing, officials from the CDC and several medical societies also predicted that plenty of vaccine will be available this season.”Vaccine is out there in abundance,” said William Schaffner, MD, president-elect of the NFID and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “We should continue to vaccinate through the fall and into winter and into the early part of next year.”A newsletter from the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, a coalition of numerous medical and health organizations, said last week that about 148 million doses, a record number, is expected to be available this season in the United States. About 35 million doses had been distributed as of Sep 5, the coalition said.Last spring, the CDC recommended for the first time that school-age children, from 5 through 18, should receive flu immunizations, which added about 30 million children to the groups included in vaccination recommendations. (Children from 6 through 59 months old were included in earlier recommendations.) In all, 261 million Americans are targeted in the CDC recommendations, the NFID said.The reason for immunizing school-age children is that they have higher flu rates than most groups and the virus spreads easily in schools, said Dr. Renee Jenkins, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. “And reducing the rate in children reduces the rate in the community at large,” she added.Officials said 86 children died of flu in the 2007-08 season.Under-immunized groupsImmunization coverage varies widely among the different flu-shot target groups, officials said today. The NFID said immunization rates last year were 66.7% for people 65 and older—well below federal targets—and 36.2% for those between 50 and 64. CDC data show that only 21.3% of children aged 6 through 23 months were fully vaccinated in the 2006-07 season, the NFID reported.A recent NFID consumer survey of 2,029 adults pointed up the need for healthcare providers to promote flu vaccination, officials said. Seventy percent said they would be very likely to get vaccinated if their provider recommended it. But nearly 4 in 10 respondents overall, and nearly 1 in 5 elderly people, reported they had never discussed flu vaccination with their provider. Of those who had talked about the subject, half said they had raised it themselves.More than 30% of Americans who receive Medicare do not receive flu shots, said Kerry Weems, acting director of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in the NFID release. Medicare covers both flu and pneumococcal vaccinations for all beneficiaries. Officials also urged all Americans 65 and older to get the pneumococcal vaccine, which guards against infections that cause pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis.Coverage in healthcare workersOfficials at the briefing also stressed the need to increase flu immunization coverage among healthcare workers, only 42% of whom were vaccinated in 2006.Gerberding expressed a personal view that it is “unconscionable” for a healthcare worker to avoid flu immunization unless he or she has a medical contraindication.”I would encourage healthcare facilities to measure their levels of vaccination and report them,” and patients should ask about the rates, she said.When a reporter asked if any healthcare facilities are requiring employees to be vaccinated, Schaffner said, “There are individual facilities that are moving in that direction. We’re hoping that they will document their activities and publish that so we can all benefit from those things.”Another question was whether experts have identified particular groups of people who are less likely to get flu shots. Schaffner replied, “It’s quite clear that African-Americans and Hispanics and others don’t avail themselves as of immunization as often as Caucasians do.”In response to another question, Gerberding declined to predict how bad the upcoming flu season will be. “As far as prognostication, I’ve learned the hard way never to predict anything about influenza,” she said.Schaffner offered a different answer: “I’ll predict something: There will be influenza, it will come, we’ll have an outbreak, there will be people ill, some will be hospitalized, and some will die.”See also: Sep 19 National Vaccine Summit newsletterhttp://www.preventinfluenza.org/summit_news_91908.pdflast_img read more

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London West End

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Governor Wolf, Rep. Stephens Announce Bottled Water Availability for Horsham Area Residents

first_img May 19, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf, Rep. Stephens Announce Bottled Water Availability for Horsham Area Residentscenter_img Press Release,  PSA Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and Rep. Todd Stephens today announced that the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will supply bottled drinking water on an interim basis to residents with confirmed levels of perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS) OR perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in the area of the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base (NAS JRB) Willow Grove, former Naval Air Station (NAS) Warminster and Air National Guard (ANG) Horsham.“We are taking precautionary action to ensure all residents in the area are receiving water until we receive further guidance from the EPA on this matter,” Governor Wolf said.The drinking water for these residents is currently below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s current provisional Health Advisory levels (PHALs). However, Governor Wolf, after conversations with Rep. Stephens, directed DEP to provide bottled water on an interim basis in anticipation of possible revised guidance from the EPA in the near future.“I appreciate the governor and DEP working with us to provide safe drinking water to local residents,” Stephens said. “Until the EPA ensures the water coming from our faucets is safe for everyone to drink, the state must continue to protect its residents.”Free bottled water was made available for pickup by residents of Horsham, Warrington and Warminster beginning at Noon today at the Horsham Community Center, located at 1025 Horsham Road in Horsham. Bottled water will be available Friday from 9:00-6:00 and DEP staff will be on hand both days to facilitate distribution. Residents will be provided with 2 cases of water per day.Bottled water is available to residents on public water systems and private wells that have tested below the PHAL levels for PFOS/PFOA but still detect the chemicals. Residents whose private wells are contaminated above the PHALs (0.2 ppb for perfluorooctane sulphonate or PFOS and 0.4 ppb for perfluorooctanoic acid or PFOA) are currently supplied with bottled water by the U.S. Navy and Air National Guard.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Signs Tierne’s Law, Urges Action on Domestic Violence Legislation (Round-up)

first_imgGovernor Wolf Signs Tierne’s Law, Urges Action on Domestic Violence Legislation (Round-up) April 18, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Public Safety,  Round-Up,  The Blog On Monday, Governor Wolf signed SB 449, also known as Tierne’s Law, sponsored by Senator Camera Bartolotta. This act amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) and clarifies judges’ use of risk assessment tools when setting bail amounts to determine whether the perpetrators of domestic violence pose a continued danger to their victims.By signing Tierne’s Law, Governor Wolf builds on his support for victims of domestic violence. On April 6, the governor asked State House leaders and committee chairs to send him a package of domestic violence reform bills that passed overwhelmingly in the Senate.“I urge the House to pass a package of domestic bills, including Senate Bill 501, which would fix an arcane law that allows domestic abusers to have access to guns,” said Governor Wolf. “We know that many domestic abusers use firearms to harm their victims, as was the case with Tierne, who died from a gunshot wound inflicted by her abuser spouse.”According to recent research, from 2009 to 2016 in the U.S., there were 156 mass shootings—incidents in which four or more people were shot and killed, not including the shooter. These incidents resulted in 1,187 victims shot: 848 people were shot and killed, and 339 people were shot and injured. The majority of mass shootings—54 percent of cases—were related to domestic or family violence.To see the complete list of the Senate’s domestic violence legislation backed by Governor Wolf, click here.Take a look at the coverage below:center_img Tribune-Democrat: Wolf signs law intended to stop abusers from becoming killersGov. Tom Wolf on Monday signed Tierne’s Law, with a goal of giving victims of domestic violence additional protection.The law directs the state sentencing commission to develop an assessment tool for judges to use to determine if abusers pose a serious risk of new violence.Associated Press: Wolf signs bill providing guidelines on domestic abuse bailA new Pennsylvania law is in place to help guide judges setting bail for defendants accused of domestic abuse. Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf on Monday signed “Tierne’s Law,” letting county courts set guidelines for assessing whether a defendant in such cases poses a threat.The state sentencing commission will develop model pretrial risk assessment standards.WNEP: ‘Tierne’s Law’ Increases Protection for Domestic Violence VictimsPennsylvania lawmakers have taken a step in increasing protections for victims of domestic violence. Governor Tom Wolf signed a bill into law which aims to strengthen bail requirements in domestic violence cases.KYW Newsradio: Governor Wolf Signs ‘Risk Assessment’ Domestic Violence BillPennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf has signed a bill intended to improve judges’ ability to evaluate the threat posed by defendants in domestic violence cases.Judges use ‘risk assessment’ tools – such as examining criminal backgrounds – when setting bail in domestic violence cases. Dubbed “Tierne’s Law,” in memory of a woman who was kidnapped and murdered by her estranged husband, the bill signed by Governor Wolf is intended to clarify and expand judges’ use of risk assessment.WGAL: Governor signs bill strengthening protections for domestic violence victimsGov. Tom Wolf signed a bill strengthening protections for victims of domestic violence. Tierne’s Law allows judges to use risk assessment tools to determine whether the perpetrators pose a continued danger to their victims. By: Governor’s Office of Communicationslast_img read more

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