Civil service pushes for emotional intelligence

first_imgManagers who are extroverts are likely to be rated as more emotionallyintelligent than their introverted peers, according to research from the Centrefor Management and Policy Studies. Roy Howells, a training consultant at CMPS, who carried out the research,has collected data from 180 middle to senior civil service managers whoattended emotional intelligence (EQ) training at the Civil Service College. Each manager had their EQ assessed by their bosses and colleagues. They alsocompleted a self-assessment exercise on their management style. When Howells put the two together, he found that managers who scoredthemselves as extrovert and flexible, and who said they based decisions more onvalues than analysis, were rated as the most emotionally intelligent. “Just because you are introverted doesn’t mean you don’t have the sameemotional awareness and empathy as your colleagues, but you have to express itif you want them to recognise your EQ,” Howells told Training Magazine. He is now using the research findings in the EQ training that CMPS offers atthe Civil Service College to help participants develop and hone their EQ.”These results suggest that what people appreciate from their managers isdialogue,” Howells said. “Introverted managers need to speak up a bit more. And if you tend tobe more analytical, you need to work on understanding your own and otherpeople’s values. We are not talking about changing someone’s personality butabout being more flexible. Introverts are often very good listeners. We don’twant them to lose this skill, instead we want extroverts to learn fromthem.” By Lucie Carrington Civil service pushes for emotional intelligenceOn 1 Jun 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Activity patterns of wintering Great Skuas Stercorarius skua

first_imgCapsule Great Skuas Stercorarius skua wintering in different areas spent different amounts of time in flight (foraging or searching for food) and so may be experiencing different feeding conditions. Aims To compare the daily percentage of time spent in flight (foraging or searching for food) between different wintering areas. Methods In 2008, loggers equipped with a saltwater sensor were deployed on adult Great Skuas at three colonies in the northeast Atlantic, and the data used to compare foraging activity between the five main wintering areas. Results The five areas used by 22 Great Skuas in winter were widely separated, from the northwest Atlantic to northwest Africa, and differ substantially in oceanography. The main difference in foraging effort among areas for individuals that were site-faithful was that the percentage of time per day spent in flight off northwest Africa was much lower than elsewhere. Among five birds that travelled between wintering areas, one reduced the percentage of time in flight after switching from Iberia to northwest Africa. Conclusion The data suggest that feeding conditions were better off northwest Africa than elsewhere, at least during winter 2008/09. This allowed Great Skuas wintering in that region to spend more time resting, so probably reducing their overall energy expenditure.last_img read more

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PNSY Prepares USS Annapolis for Maintenance

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today PNSY Prepares USS Annapolis for Maintenance PNSY Prepares USS Annapolis for Maintenance View post tag: americas View post tag: PNSY Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNSY) workers safely drydocked USS Annapolis (SSN 760) June 15 for planned maintenance work and several system upgrades.Annapolis arrived at PNSY April 25, and the dry-docking of the submarine is part of a greater engineering overhaul scheduled to last 23 months.More than a year prior to Annapolis’ arrival, the shipyard assembled a project planning team comprised of individuals from engineering and production departments. The team developed a detailed plan for this maintenance availability to ensure a successful overhaul for Annapolis and the shipyard.Portsmouth Naval Shipyard is the Navy’s center of excellence for attack submarine overhaul, repair and modernization. As a field activity of NAVSEA, PNSY is committed to maximizing the material readiness of the fleet by continuing to safely deliver first-time quality work, on time and on budget.[mappress mapid=”16270″]Image: US Navy Share this article View post tag: maintenance Authoritiescenter_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy June 19, 2015 View post tag: USS Annapolis View post tag: prepares View post tag: Navallast_img read more

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COMMENTARY: HOME AND HOPE

first_imgHOME AND HOPEby Bill HAZELIP-EVANSVILLEA very interesting article in the Evansville Courier on 4-4-2019.  The article was titled Homes & Hope, and it primarily dealt with the poor economic situation we have here in our city.  The article covered the work that was being done by a Christian nonprofit Community One group.  The article covered the housing situation in Evansville and the poverty factor that has led to almost half of the homes built before 1951 are in need of major repairs.In the report, 43% of Vanderburgh County residents live below the Federal Poverty Level and less than the cost of living in Indiana.  That means almost half of our community cannot afford life’s basic needs such as housing, child care, food, health care, and transportation. The article told about the great work that this group is doing and  “Christian Community One”  deserves all of the support we can give them!“And now the rest of the story,”  Paul Harvey, for many years appeared on Radio telling stories like the one above, but he always told the story of how we got into this situation in the first place, as Mr. Harvey would say,  “and now the rest of the story!”   The word is simple “Exodus” (the movement of people, places and things)  For some reason, all of the great Journalists and Reporters have never touched the reason for Evansville’s exodus.  Yes, they would report that Swift and Weil packing companies were leaving town or that International Harvester, Whirlpool, Bucyrus Erie, Iglehart, Servel, and a hundred more were leaving. They even mentioned that we were once known as “The furniture capital of the world,”  “Refrigerator Capital of the world,”  or we were the city that made the most significant contribution of World War 2.   The fact that we don’t talk about our past industry failures is why we now have the poverty level that we all now disdain!What happened to the city that was supposed to have close to a half-million people, at the turn of the century?  A city that now has a service type of economy,  and low salaries for the few young ones to remain here?  No one wants to ask the question “what happened?” Perhaps 70 years of “City Hall”  failures are too big of a story to write about!FOOTNOTE: The City-County Observer posted this article with opinion, bias or editing.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Watch A Free Webcast Of Trey Anastasio And The Rest Of The Sets At Levitate Music & Arts Festival

first_imgThe Levitate Music & Arts Festival Live Stream is up an running, playing free webcasts of each of the festival’s sets as they happen. In addition to performances by Ripe, Twiddle, Robert Randolph and the Family Band, Slightly Stoopid, and Stick Figure, Trey Anastasio Trio + Ray Paczkowski will headline today’s festivities to close out a weekend run with Russ Lawton, Tony Markellis, and the newly recovered Paczkowski after stops in Charlottesville on Thursday and at New York’s Central Park on Friday. Tonight is the last Trey solo band stop on the schedule before he links back up with Phish for their summer tour beginning July 17th in Tahoe.Thanks to Levitate Music & Arts Festival’s live stream, you can catch the last show of the run from wherever you happen to be when they hit. Trey Anastasio and company take the stage at 8pm.EXCLUSIVE: Levitate Founder Dan Hassett Talks Good Music, Sustainability, & Community Levitate Music Festival 2018 Live Stream[Video: ineffablemusicgroup]Tomorrow, the live stream gets started early with a 1:30pm set by Stephen Marley, followed by Spafford at 2:15, Lake Street Dive at 3:45, Turkuaz at 4:15, West End Blend at 5:15, Rebelution at 5:30, Greensky Bluegrass at 6:15, Mihali & Frends at 7:30, and The Head and the Heart at 7:45. You can check out the full weekend live stream schedule for Levitate Music & Arts Festival below.last_img read more

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Innovation assignment

first_imgTyler Hester cried into a stack of buttermilk pancakes at an IHOP in Pasadena, Calif.It was two months into his teaching career, and he was already feeling overwhelmed and ineffective. “I’ll never forget this,” he said, recalling the breakfast with his mother. “The pancakes had just arrived and she asked me, ‘Tyler, how are you doing?’ My eyes welled up and a tear drop literally rolled onto the pancake in front of me and I just said, ‘Mom, it’s so hard.’”A decade later, that low point led Hester, now in the final year of a doctor of education leadership program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, to an idea: create an initiative to offer struggling new teachers emotional support. The need for such a program was apparent to Hester not just because of his own experience, but because of the nation’s high rates of teacher burnout and turnover.But how to find the support and guidance to take his idea and turn it into an actual program? Hester turned to Operation Impact, a program launched last year by the Office of the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning and its Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching that supports budding entrepreneurs in education innovation.Operation Impact has funded almost 200 students working on more than 80 projects around the country and the world. Ventures have included a school readiness app for incoming kindergartners, a medical case-logging system for surgeons, a workforce training program for youth in Indonesia, a support program for adolescents living with a caregiver or family member who struggles with mental health issues or addiction, and a mobile app that helps match students and mentors.The program awards small seed grants for pilot projects, typically $200 to $500 up to four times a year, and provides access to software from its corporate sponsors that can help the groups get their projects off the ground. Limiting the size of the awards allows Operation Impact to spread the grants around more widely.“We didn’t want to just award a bunch of people,” said Jaime B. Goldstein, HILT’s director of strategic projects and innovation grants. “We wanted to teach as many people as possible the mechanisms for how you go about being a change agent [in the field of education].”The program encourages students to collaborate across disciplines and requires teams to meet with Harvard graduate students, called program fellows, who have experience in education innovation.Funded by SMART Technologies — one of Operation Impact’s corporate sponsors —the fellows understand what funders are looking for, and they help teams research the problems they are addressing, build businesses plans, grow their teams, and tap into relevant research at Harvard. They also connect teams with external experts and potential funders. Their ultimate goal is to help the groups move their projects forward, said Gorick Ng, M.B.A. ’18, a fellow from last year.“Standing between someone who has the passion, the background, and the skills and this better world they aspire to is this big mountain, this paralyzing question of what to do next. The problem is a lack of guidance, a lack of resources, a lack of community,” Ng said. “What this program offers is a structured way to help people take what is otherwise an overwhelming sense of ambiguity and nudge them into motion and help them take that next best step.”,For New Teachers Thriving, the program Hester started, Operation Impact and its fellows helped the team organize their resource allocation, develop their growth strategy, and prepare for meetings with funders and pitch competitions. In fact, Hester said participation in HILT helped the team — which includes Crystel Harris, Ed.L.D. ’21, and Akash Wasil ’19 — become finalists in two other Harvard funding competitions that support student entrepreneurs: the President’s Innovation Challenge and the Harvard Business School New Venture Competition. But what helped most of all was the confidence Operation Impact instilled in the group, Hester said.“It was a big wind in our sails to have someone say, ‘This idea is not crazy. We think there’s something here and we think you should pursue it,’” Hester said. “It was just really encouraging to get their support.”With funding this past year, the team was able to purchase food and supplies for the personal-development training they delivered to more than 50 Boston Public School teachers. This year, because of their early success, they’re reaching even more educators. Teachers in Boston are currently applying for the second version of the program and nearly 200 district teachers and administrators in Stockton, Calif., are taking part. In the future, New Teachers Thriving hopes to offer their training online so they can reach thousands of teachers across the country.While Hester’s group did well, others got even more traction. Brown Art Ink has been lifting up artists of color for the past five years in cities such as Baltimore, Cleveland, Washington, D.C., Toronto, and Mexico City by offering training and creating paid opportunities for them to show their work in museums, galleries, and other public spaces. Co-founders Amanda Figueroa, who’s earning her Ph.D. in American studies from the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Ravon Ruffin turned their $200 grant from Operation Impact into $8,000 in annual revenue.This year, Operation Impact will invite students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to collaborate, making it open not only to all Harvard students in degree-granting programs but to all MIT students, too.The move is in line with the program’s stance on collaboration. Teams must include more than one person and preferably feature members who represent different disciplines across both campuses.“You don’t solve a complicated problem like education with one field alone,” Goldstein said. “You need a business mind. You need a technology mind. You need a marketing, sales mind. You need a pedagogy mind. You need all these different skill sets.”Teams last year featured a mix of students from Harvard College, Harvard Business School, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard Extension School, GSAS, Harvard Graduate School of Design, HGSE, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard Law School, and Harvard School of Public Health. There were also many non-Harvard affiliated members.Operation Impact was designed in collaboration with HGSE, the Social Innovation and Change Initiative at HKS, the iLabs, and the HBS Social Enterprise Initiative. It works with SMART Technologies, Wix.com, Amazon Web Services (AWS) Educate, AWS EdStart, and RallyCry Ventures, which provide funding and access to software and experts.One of the driving factors for its creation was the need for increased funding in education innovation. According to research from HILT, 97 percent of students looking for funding in education innovation at Harvard weren’t getting it.“To me that was just not the message that I think we wanted to be giving students across Harvard,” Goldstein said. “In my mind, we need more students and not less students working in this problem space. We should be giving as many of them as possible the experiences to learn what it actually takes to take an idea and do something in the real world with it.”Operation Impact’s University-wide kickoff event for students seeking funding this year is Oct. 3 at the Smith Campus Center from 5 to 8 p.m. Interested students can RSVP here.last_img read more

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Smashburger to replace Burger King in LaFortune Student Center

first_imgThe 18-year reign of Burger King in LaFortune Student Center will soon come to a close.Starting next fall, a Smashburger will open in its place, Notre Dame Campus Dining, Student Government and Student Activities Facilities announced early Wednesday morning.This decision was made in response to student feedback — gathered through surveys, focus groups and Student Government’s online forum, Onward.“The student feedback we received throughout the multiple focus group sessions beginning in December of 2014 helped us collectively identify what brands fit in the retail dining portfolio,” Chris Abayasinghe, director of Campus Dining, said. “… We looked to bring in a new and exciting brand — and selected Smashburger.”The project has been in the works for the past two years, Abayasinghe said, and stemmed from student feedback asking for premium options for burgers, chicken and salads on campus.Construction on Smashburger — a national fast-food chain and serves burgers, chicken, salads, sides and milkshakes — will begin immediately following Commencement weekend this May. The restaurant’s opening date is set for the beginning of the new academic year.Junior Erica Tabor, Student Government director of communications, said administrators and student leaders considered a variety of alternative restaurants to replace Burger King.“What I am most proud of — and what I think is a good reflection of the mission of our Executive Board — is that our aim was to accurately represent and serve the student body,” she said. “I think this is a good beginning to our term and sets a precedence that we are working on improving communication between students and administration, and continuing positive change in our Notre Dame community.”In student feedback, Tabor said she noticed a significant number of students asking for new or improved campus dining options and hours.“We are extremely excited to bring Smashburger to LaFortune,” she said. “Their mission emphasizes fresh, wholesome and natural ingredients, which is moving toward a healthier option of burgers than others often offered on college campuses.”Abayasinghe said Campus Dining is planning to implement more changes and initiatives at Notre Dame in the near future.“We’re planning the North Dining Hall renovation, a number of new restaurants for the Duncan Student Center and renovations into select restaurants currently on campus,” he said.Tags: Burger King, Campus DIning, LaFortune Student Center, Onward, Smashburger, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Brazil Helps Guatemalan Army Strengthen Teaching Efforts in Humanitarian Aid, Rescue

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo August 10, 2016 The Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC) is helping the Guatemalan Army and other national rescue units assemble the first group of instructors in teaching methods and techniques for emergency and natural disaster response. The training will help improve the work of humanitarian aid and rescue units. A team of 10 service members from the Guatemalan Army’s Humanitarian and Rescue Unit (UHR, for its Spanish acronym), along with the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction, firefighters, and other national relief agencies participated in the two-week training that took place at the UHR facilities in the La Aurora Central Air Command, in Guatemala City. In an interview with Diálogo, Infantry Colonel Osman Roel Gaitán Monzón, commander of the Guatemalan Army’s UHR said, “The main objective of this first training is to prepare a group of instructors from the UHR and from the various rescue organizations to be ‘multipliers’ of direct and indirect response methods and techniques, passing along their knowledge in order to strengthen humanitarian aid and rescue efforts during emergencies.” Four members of the Brazilian Army’s Fire Department, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Roberto Sangaletti, taught various teaching methods to soldiers from the UHR and rescue personnel. The participants learned teaching and lesson planning, as well as evaluation techniques. Soldiers and rescue personnel were chosen for their experience and knowledge in rescue missions and humanitarian aid. They will share what they learned with the nine civil-affairs and humanitarian-aid detachments that are deployed in various Guatemalan Army Brigades throughout the country. The participants will be certified as instructors after passing the training course, which took place in June and continues through August and October. “This is the first opportunity we have had to become certified in teaching techniques by a foreign agency,” Col. Gaitán said. The ABC is tasked with negotiating, coordinating, executing, and supervising technical cooperation programs and projects in Brazil. According to its website, the agency contributes to training and skill development geared toward the promotion and exchange of innovative experiences and best practices between Brazil and other Latin American countries. “This type of cooperation allows us to exchange experiences and knowledge, as well as to improve our response in serving the demands of the population during natural disaster emergencies such as landslides, floods, hurricanes, and other climate-related phenomena,” said Col. Gaitán. “It will also strengthen the training method of the UHR, which instructs other Army units and government bodies, and it will strengthen bonds of friendship and cooperation with Brazil.” In contrast to other Guatemalan rescue groups, the UHR is a specialized, highly mobile Army unit with a battalion level structure, which has the capacity to operate during large-scale disasters. As a member of the Conference of Central American Armed Forces, the command also assists other countries in need of its help, according to a July 2nd, 2013 Diálogo report. Guatemala is concerned about training and equipping its various Armed Forces units to effectively react to their assigned missions. To save and protect people’s lives and reduce the effects of natural disasters, the UHR has received training and education from Brazil, the United States, Canada, Argentina, and other Central American countries. For example, UHR personnel took the Hazardous Materials Handling Course, which was taught by Arkansas National Guard members, in the facilities of the Guatemalan Army Corps of Engineers, according to a Guatemalan Ministry of Defense report. “A team of six officers from the Arkansas National Guard carried out the second phase of this training during the second week of July. A total of 35 Army officers, 20 of whom are from the UHR, were trained on the handling and storage of chemical precursors,” Col. Gaitán said. “Thanks to the professionalism of our personnel and the training we have received from partner nations, we have been able to integrate well with the various national and international government institutions, enabling us to cooperate and contribute in any emergency or assignment,” added the Colonel. Guatemala’s UHR has provided technical consulting on recovery, rehabilitation, and reconstruction of affected areas in international missions such as on April 16th in Ecuador, when a 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit the Andean nation; a search-and-rescue mission in El Salvador for those affected by Hurricane Ida in 2009; and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and mudslide in Costa Rica. According to the most recent World Risk Index, Guatemala is the fourth most vulnerable country to natural disasters. Because of its location, there are many landslides, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, for which the UHR is trained in search and rescue for various structures and in first aid, as well as in needs analysis for operation in any type of terrain and meteorological conditions, among other capabilities. “It is important to have the best-trained rescue units possible,” said Sandino Asturias, director of the Center for Guatemala Studies. “The goal for Guatemala is for all of these needed trainings to be permanently institutionalized to enhance the success of the missions assigned to the relief units.”last_img read more

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Waters vows to take up NAFCU-urged CFPB exemption for credit unions in January

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr House Financial Service Committee Ranking Member Maxine Waters, D-Calif., speaking before NAFCU’s Congressional Caucus Wednesday, said credit unions should have greater exemptions from many of CFPB’s rulemakings and that she is willing to address the issue via legislation in the next Congress if the bureau continues to resist.“I’m going to take a look at this issue in January, and if legislation is needed to clarify, I will take up that issue,” she said. “I don’t mind doing that because of who you are and the services you provide to our country.”“NAFCU thanks Ranking Member Waters for her support of credit unions’ exemption from certain CFPB rulemakings,” said NAFCU Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler. “She understands that credit unions provide a huge service to the American economy and the nation’s small businesses and that, with relief from overly burdensome rules, they could do much more.”Earlier this year, a bipartisan group of 329 members of the House signed a letter to Cordray urging him to use his Dodd-Frank authority to provide greater exemptions to credit unions from certain rulemakings. A bipartisan group of 70 senators sent a similar letter in July. continue reading »last_img read more

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