Fast track back to work

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Musculoskeletal disorders cost sufferers and employers a lot of time, moneyand distress, but research suggests that the sooner treatment is offered, thebetter, by Janice Kaye Musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) is one of the greatest challenges foroccupational health. Although the risks in the working environment from MSD can be managed andcontrolled, away from work, the causes of injury can be found in every cornerof life, far beyond the influence of good working practices. The size of theproblem is not in question: – An annual loss of almost 13 million working days due to back pain – Musculoskeletal disorder affecting 1.1 million people a year – A cost to society of £10bn a year, requiring up to 12 million GPconsultations1 – Accounting for 60 per cent of all absenteeism, the cost of MSD has beenrising steadily at £500m a year2 Tackling the issue Attempts to tackle the issue have focused mainly on work practices. In 1992,the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) established the Manual HandlingOperations Regulations, a framework within which employers might reduce manualhandling injury. The following year, it launched Getting to Grips with HandlingProblems, and later, HSE Manual Handling – Solutions you can Handle. Back inWork started in 1999 with funded back pain projects in the workplace, with aview to developing good practice models. The messages promoted by these initiatives are now widely accepted. Properassessments of the task at hand, the loads involved, the working environmentand the individuals’ capabilities are now all essential practices. Also key isthat there is no substitute for the provision of good manual handling trainingwhen the avoidance of manual handling operations is impossible. Risk factors for MSD are recognised in virtually every workplace. While theHSE’s key message is that things can be done to minimise incidents of MSD andthat measures are cost effective, it accepts that you cannot prevent them all,and that early reporting, proper treatment and suitable rehabilitation areessential. MSD is most visible in human and financial terms in the workplace, but itsorigins are as likely to be found at home or on the sports field, far beyondthe employers’ sphere of responsibility and liability. But when it affects anindividual’s ability to work, the employer is faced with the consequences,despite having had no control over its cause. Quick turnaround Resistance to the idea of funding occupational health and rehabilitationschemes for disorders that are often unrelated to work is understandable. Butif attention is shifted pragmatically on to the cost savings by getting employeesback to work quickly, occupational rehabilitation makes good business sense. Getting people back to work quickly is now also the medical view. In areview of current research, The Royal College of General Practitionersconcludes that bed rest for two to seven days is worse than a placebo orordinary activity, and that prolonged bed rest may lead to chronic disability.It recommends manipulative treatment for pain relief and for patients who failto return to normal activities; ‘in acute and sub-acute back pain, manipulationprovides better short term improvement in pain and activity levels and higherlevels of patient satisfaction than the treatments to which it has beencompared’. This assumes the availability of resources. The OH professional faces thechallenge of finding qualified osteopaths, physical therapists or chiropractorsat short notice, at any number of locations around the country. There is theadditional challenge of managing rehabilitation and absence from work, whilelearning as much as possible from each incident for ongoing risk assessment. Osteopaths for Industry has been providing manual handling training to staffand in-house trainers for 16 years; the organisation is the sole trainingprovider for the 7,000 active personnel in the London Fire Brigade. Its workhas brought it close to the MSD issue, and it saw the need for nationwidefast-track treatment linked to the management of the absence and a reportingsystem that identified black spots. Four years ago, it created MMS National Ltd to provide absence managementand rehabilitation services for the OH profession. The company established anetwork of 3,000 chiropractors, osteopaths and physical therapists, and createda system of fast-track rehabilitation, absence management and standardised datagathering, which has been proven with clients such as Excel Treadteam, Greggsplc and British Polythene Industries. Clients retain control of the whole episode, from injury to return to work.It gives them the tool to monitor company-wide rates of injury, identify riskareas and develop preventative strategies. Any musculoskeletal condition is treated within 72 hours by a therapistbased close to the injured worker. The genuine musculoskeletal injury respondswell to early treatment and clients have seen the average absence period shrinkfrom 28 working days lost to four days; 75 per cent of MMS National referralsdo not take time off at all other than for treatment sessions, and the companyfrequently sees client MSD-related absenteeism halved. The service is established on a pay-as-you-go basis, and any size oforganisation can benefit; from those with a handful of workers to largecompanies with thousands of employees across the UK. It is the experience of many client companies that the service isself-financing. Absence rates are reduced for legitimate conditions, while theprospect of quick treatment and a proactive absence management structurecreates a powerful deterrent to malingerers. Providing a musculoskeletal injury referral service can be seen in manylights. It is part economic expedient and part OH necessity; part riskassessment tool, part perk, and part malingerers’ disincentive. Conclusion The Revitalising Health and Safety strategy set goals to reduce the incidenceof work-related illness caused by MSDs by 12 per cent, and the number ofworking days lost to MSDs by 15 per cent by 2004. Increased inspections and newmanual handling assessment tools are all part of the compliance element of thislong-term OH plan. Increased fines, sentences and other disincentives forbreaches of health and safety legislation, as well as streamlining the lawitself, are all documented Government and HSC objectives. Back pain, musculoskeletal injury and repetitive strain injury are a hugeburden and quite rightly a high-profile target for the HSE. Appropriateintervention, early access to treatment and feedback into risk management haveproven to work on many levels as the only real response to increasing financialand regulatory pressure on employers to address the problem. Janice Kaye, a trained osteopath, is managing director of MMS National Ltdand of Osteopaths for Industry Ltd, which provides preventative training, andmusculoskeletal injury and absence management services on a countrywide basisacross the UK and Ireland References 1. HSE (1998), Self-reporting work related illness in 1995; results from ahousehold survey 2. The Back Pain Revolution, by Gordon Waddell, Churchill & Livingston,first published 1998 www.hse.gov.ukBPI’s injury and absenteeism challengeBritish Polythene Industries (BPI) isan international company with 3,000 employees across 38 sites in the UK, and afurther 2,000 across 45 companies worldwide. In the late 1990s, before thecurrent focus on musculoskeletal disorder (MSD), the company was looking for ananswer to spiralling injury and absenteeism rates across its UK workforce.Andy Collinson, group health and safety manager for thecompany, was researching a solution that would work across many levels. Itneeded to rehabilitate those injured as effectively as possible and therebyreduce absenteeism. It had to be seen as good for the workforce and, therefore,receive union acceptance. It also had to make good business sense.He discovered that prevention and treatment were beingaddressed  together by Osteopaths forIndustry and MMS National. While the organisation provided preventativetraining, the key was a service that treats injuries within a few hours,oversees each absence and provides a company-wide view on MSD problem areas.In 1998, before it employed MMS National, each incident of MSDabsence at BPI resulted in an average of 26 working days lost. The followingyear – the first using the system – the number of lost days was down to fourfor each MSD absence.”Over the first year, we substantially reduced BPI’s lostdays from handling injuries. In financial terms, the benefits outweigh thecosts by 12:1. We were able to make a case for improvement, prioritise areasand demonstrate the impact we have had from hard measurable facts,” saysCollinson.In 2001, more than 400 members of staff were referred to MMSNational. Each had an average of four treatments, and more than 75 per centremained at work while undergoing therapy. It does not matter if the injuryoccurred at work or at home, because any type of back injury will demand earlyattention or risk lengthy rehabilitation; 74 per cent of BPI’s injuries werenon-work related.Only 19 per cent of the referrals had to take time off work. Afurther 17 per cent were temporarily put on restricted duties and 64 per centwere fit for work.Musculoskeletal injury responds well to early treatment, andthis contrasts with the traditional route of dealing with musculoskeletalinjury through GP prescriptions and sick notes, which often results in costlylong-term absence.  “This rehabilitation scheme created the solutions weneeded in terms of health and safety and occupational health. It was popularwith the workforce and their representatives, and it made excellent businesssense; for every pound we spent on the scheme, we made a saving of £12,”says Collinson. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Fast track back to workOn 1 May 2003 in Musculoskeletal disorders, Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Cushman reports 10% drop in revenue in 2020

first_img Full Name* But there was some good news: Fourth quarter leasing revenue was up 21 percent over the previous quarter, and investment sales revenue more than doubled, showing some signs of recovery.“Our fourth quarter result is the balance of encouraging signals on business activity, especially in brokerage, and validation of our commitment to operational excellence,” said CEO Brett White during a Thursday earnings call. “We have executed very well in a very fluid and uncertain environment.”For all of 2020, the company recorded a net loss of $220.5 million, and revenue of $7.8 billion — a 10 percent dip from 2019’s number.Still, the loss was partially offset by the stable income from the company’s property and facility management sector.The firm’s cost saving efforts of about $300 million in 2020 also contributed to mitigate the loss, said CFO Duncan Palmer, who will be stepping down from the position on Feb. 28. Neil Johnson has been appointed as a new CFO.Though the pandemic-driven downturn continues, executives expressed some optimism about the future during the call.“As we look ahead, most economists are cautiously optimistic that the worst of the pandemic impact on the economy is largely behind us,” said Kevin Thorpe, the company’s chief economist. “By extension, the worst of the impact on the property market is also largely behind us.”Contact Akiko Matsuda Email Address* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Commercial Real EstateCushman & Wakefield Share via Shortlink Cushman & Wakefield CEO Brett WhiteThe fourth quarter of 2020 was another tough one for Cushman & Wakefield, putting an end to a tough year for the commercial real estate giant.Cushman reported a net loss of $27.3 million in the fourth quarter, its fourth consecutive quarterly loss in 2020. Quarterly revenue was $2.3 billion, a decrease of 13 percent over the same time the previous year. The pandemic was once again the culprit, as leasing activity remains lower than it was in 2019.The firm recorded $388.7 million in revenue from leasing, down by 36 percent from the same time last year. Revenue from investment sales activities was $319.3 million, down 12 percent from a year ago.Read moreCushman reports $37.3M loss in Q3Leadership shake-ups hit Vornado, Cushman & Wakefield and Howard HughesCushman’s $3B debt load poses default risk Message* Tagslast_img read more

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Dixie State University Postpones 2020 Football Season

first_img Tags: Dixie State University Football FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Per a Wednesday announcement, Dixie State football confirmed their 2020 football season has been postponed.Citing covid-19, administrators at the St. George-based university have decided to try and play football in the 2021 spring semester.July 1, Dixie State advanced to NCAA Division I after spending the past 14 years at the NCAA Division II level.It remains to be seen when the Trailblazers will release an updated schedule. Written by Brad James August 12, 2020 /Sports News – Local Dixie State University Postpones 2020 Football Seasonlast_img

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Reliance, BP begin production from Satellite Cluster gas field, India

first_imgThe offshore gas field has been brought onstream two months ahead of its schedule The Satellite Cluster gas field is located in the Krishna-Godavari Basin, off the east coast of India. (Credit: QR9iudjz0 from FreeImages) Reliance Industries and BP have commenced production from the Satellite Cluster gas field in the KG D6 block in the Krishna-Godavari Basin off the east coast of India.According to Reliance Industries, the offshore gas field has been brought onstream two months ahead of its schedule in spite of the challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic.The Satellite Cluster gas field will produce gas from four reservoirs using five wells. It is anticipated to achieve gas production of up to six million standard cubic meters per day (mmscmd).The field, which was to begin production in mid-2021, is located nearly 60km from the existing onshore terminal at Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh. It is contained in water depths of up to 1850m.The Satellite Cluster gas field is one of the three deepwater gas projects being developed by Reliance Industries and BP in the KG D6 block alongside R Cluster ultra-deep-water gas field and MJ field. The three projects have been allocated a combined investment of INR350bn ($4.68bn).The R Cluster gas field was brought onstream in December 2020.Reliance Industries claimed that the R Cluster and Satellite Cluster projects are expected to jointly contribute nearly 20% of the current gas production in India.On the other hand, the MJ project is scheduled to begin production in the second half of 2022.Put together, the three KG D6 projects are projected to yield nearly 30mmscmd of natural gas by 2023. The quantity will be enough to meet up to 15% of the gas demand in India.The three gas projects will each make use of the existing hub infrastructure in the KG D6 block.Reliance Industries has an operating stake of 66.67% in the block, while BP holds the remaining stake of 33.33%.last_img read more

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Meeting to defend Kelly’s faith

first_imgThe Oxford Baha’i Society held an open meeting this week following the media frenzy surrounding the death of one of its followers, Dr David Kelly, in Oxfordshire last July. Guest speaker Barney Leith, the Secretary of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’i of the UK, spoke on the topic of “The Baha’i Faith: Fostering Unity in a War-Torn World”. Mr Leith, a local Abingdon resident, told Cherwell that “the Baha’i faith is a religion and not a sect,” as reported by some areas of the press in the Hutton Enquiry into Dr Kelly’s death. “Some parts of the media view religion as easy pickings to draw a scandal, if Dr Kelly had believed in another faith then his religion would not have been an issue. “The Baha’i faith is a progressive religion based on rational thought and a universal ethos of tolerance. We believe that the teachings of the Baha’u’llah are the key to resolving conflict in the world and bringing about a just and prosperous society.” Juliette Doostdar, a member of the Oxford Baha’i Society said that since the Hutton Enquiry there had been increased speculation and interest as to what the faith was. “We have an obligation to share our faith and by holding an open forum we felt we could create a happy medium to meet those who are interested in finding out more.”ARCHIVE: 1st Week MT2003last_img read more

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Ocean City’s Historic Life-Saving Station Enters Next Phase of Restoration

first_imgRestoration work on the old Life-Saving Station will include sprucing up the property. By Donald WittkowskiUp to this point, the transformation of Ocean City’s Life-Saving Station into a “living museum” has focused on renovations to the building and stocking it with historic artifacts to recreate its early 20th century heyday.Now, the multi-year restoration project shifts outside the building to give the storm-battered grounds some touch-up work that will improve the aesthetics of the property at Fourth Street and Atlantic Avenue.Highlights include adding new slate walkways, a flagpole and a wooden fence that will replicate the originals from the early 1900s. Handicap-accessible parking will also be built, as well as a paved area at the base of the boat ramps.The property itself will be leveled out to remove some humps that have developed over the years, including erosion caused by flooding from Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The grounds will also be reseeded for a fresh carpet of grass.“There’s lumps and humps in it and all sorts of stuff,” said John Loeper, chairman of U.S. Life-Saving Station 30, a nonprofit organization that is overseeing the renovations and operates the museum for the city.However, museum officials will be careful not to go overboard by giving the property a lush, manicured look. Well aware that the “surf men” who manned the station were more concerned about saving lives than tending to the grass, the museum will instead allow the grounds to have more of a natural appearance.“An Avalon or Stone Harbor quality was not what they had in mind,” Michael Calafati, a Cape May architect helping to supervise the restoration project, said of the life-saving men.Ocean City historian John Loeper shows photos of the Life-Saving Station and the men who worked there a century ago.Improvements to the grounds represent the third phase of the Life-Saving Station’s restoration under the city’s ownership. City Council approved a $138,400 contract on Aug. 23 for the work. A $111,000 Hurricane Sandy recovery grant from the New Jersey Historic Trust will pay for most of the contract, with the city picking up the rest, Calafati said.During the first two phases of the building’s conversion into a museum, the work focused on overhauling the exterior and interior of the structure. The U.S. Life-Saving Station 30 organization also went about painstakingly acquiring original artifacts or replicas to fill the museum.Although the building dates to the late 1800s, the interactive “living museum” recreates the Life-Saving Station’s prime period, around 1900 or 1905. The restoration of the grounds will include historic elements, such as an old-fashioned fence and flagpole, to help replicate the early 1900s, Loeper explained.“For a moment in time, you’re stepping back into 1900 or 1905,” Loeper said in an interview Thursday.One of the centerpieces of the museum will be a nearly 26-foot-long replica surf boat, similar in design, but bigger, than the lifeguard boats used these days to protect Ocean City’s beaches. Loeper said the boat is under construction at a maritime museum in North Carolina and is expected to arrive in Ocean City in October for its public debut.Calafati said a fourth phase would be needed to complete the museum. It would involve adding authentic shutters to the building and finishing the second floor, which is now closed to the public.The tiny “watch tower” on the roof allowed the surf men to search the ocean for shipwrecks.Records show that Ocean City’s Life-Saving Station was built in 1886. It is one of only a few surviving members of its type in New Jersey, Calafati said. It was among only six of its kind built between 1882 and 1891 in the nation.“This is one of the best, if not the best, restored life-saving stations on the New Jersey coast. The one in Ocean City is heads and shoulders above the others,” Calafati said in an interview Thursday.For years, the old building itself was in need of rescue. The city purchased the two-story structure from private owners in 2010 for nearly $900,000, ending a decade-long battle to save it from demolition.Altogether, the purchase price for the building and the cost of renovations will come to about $3 million, according to figures released by Frank Donato, the city’s chief financial officer. The city has been awarded around $1.3 million in grants to help pay for the project.The museum honors the surf men who risked their lives to save others. They were not like the modern-day lifeguards who protect Ocean City’s beaches.Instead, they would rush to the rescue of distressed or sinking ships off the Ocean City coast. If one was spotted close to shore, they would frantically take action, either launching their lifeboats or deploying a rope-operated system to save the ship passengers.An old desk and other artifacts help to recreate what the Life-Saving Station was like in the early 1900s.Pointing to the importance of ship travel in the 1800s, Calafati called the Ocean City Life-Saving Station and its counterparts “a vital component of America’s economic growth.”As ship travel expanded in the early 19th century, the government made passenger safety a higher priority. The U.S. Life-Saving Service, a government agency, was formed in 1848 to rescue shipwrecked passengers and crew members. It was a forerunner to the U.S. Coast Guard, which was created in 1915.Ocean City’s station was occupied by the Life-Saving Service until 1915. The Coast Guard took over then and continued to use it for life-saving operations until the 1940s. It was then sold to private owners and became a residence. A succession of owners had it as their private home for decades before the city bought it in 2010.last_img read more

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Co-op embarks on major own-label range relaunch

first_imgThe Co-op is to substantially expand its premium own-label Truly Irresistible range across its in-store bakeries.Head of bakery Mike Owen told British Baker: “After an 18-month review, we have developed a number of wonderful new lines. We are refitting 700 stores this year for an exciting new look and feel, adding a much better ambience to our stores.”We have worked very closely with our bakery suppliers to launch a fantastic new range of breads and morning goods. Our new premium range of Truly Irresistible in-store breads breads will, where space allows, be displayed in pillars of woven bread baskets, to draw the eye.”Included in the new offering are: large, all-butter croissants, triple chocolate cookies (using white and dark chocolate), golden wholemeal rolls, focaccia topped with Cheddar cheese and red and white onion. Other new launches include rye bread topped with caraway seed, a multi-grain rustique including sunflower and poppy seeds, a four-counties cheese knot with Wensleydale and Cheddar, plus a sunflower batard loaf and olive rolls that contain a combination of both green and black olives.The new range has been trialled in stores that include the Islington site, where bakery sales have seen a huge 70% increase, according to Owen.He added: “We have worked hard to deliver true provenance in the range, incorporating top-quality ingredients and healthy inclusions. We have introduced a variety of shapes and sizes suited to all eating occasions.”Importantly, we are making sure the goods really deliver on taste and texture what they promise visually. The Co-op has been working with bakers such as Délifrance Cuisine de France and La Fornaia, among others, on the new range.On the cake side, category buyer Stuart Chadwick said: “Our Truly Irresistible range accounts for 20% of our total cake sales. We will be introducing new two-pack sizes next year.”last_img read more

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Press release: Construction suppliers accused of colluding to keep prices up

first_imgThe CMA’s findings are, at this stage in its investigation, provisional and do not necessarily lead to a decision that the companies have breached competition law. The firms now have the opportunity to consider the detail of the CMA’s provisional findings and respond to it. The CMA will carefully consider any representations made before issuing its final findings as to whether the law has been broken.Find more information on our case page.Some recent examples of the CMA’s action against cartels affecting the construction industry include: These are 3 major suppliers of equipment used to keep construction workers safe. It is crucial that builders and their customers benefit from genuinely competitive pricing for this essential equipment. Everyone must follow competition law, which protects customers from being exploited and paying more, as well as encouraging companies to compete for business in other ways – through innovation, quality and service. The CMA uses its powers vigorously and robustly to root out illegal cartels. Enquiries should be directed to the CMA’s press team: [email protected], or 020 3738 6460. The Statement of Objections is addressed to the following parties, which the CMA provisionally considers were directly involved in the alleged infringements or are liable as parent companies of the undertakings directly involved: M.G.F. (Trench Construction Systems) Limited and its parent company MGF Limited; Vp plc; Mabey Hire Limited and its parent companies Mabey Engineering (Holdings) Limited and Mabey Holdings Limited. The CMA provisionally considers that MGF and Vp were involved during three periods between 23 September and 4 October 2011, 14 February to 24 November 2014 and 12 November 2015 to 28 November 2016, and that Mabey was involved between 14 February to 16 July 2014. A Statement of Objections gives addressees notice of a proposed infringement decision under the Competition Act 1998 and the equivalent EU law prohibitions. It is a provisional decision only and does not necessarily lead to an infringement decision. Addressees have the opportunity to make written and oral representations on the matters covered. Any such representations will be considered by the CMA before any final decision is made. Fining office fit out companies £7 million after they participated in cover bidding for competitive tenders, colluding on the prices they would bid for contracts. Typically, cover bidding involves companies agreeing with each other to place bids that are deliberately intended to lose the contract, which reduces the intensity of competition and can lead to customers paying an artificially high price or receiving poorer quality services. The Chapter I prohibition in the Competition Act 1998 prohibits agreements and concerted practices between businesses which have as their object or effect the prevention, restriction or distortion of competition within the UK. Article 101(1) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) covers equivalent anti-competitive agreements and concerted practices which may affect trade between EU member states.center_img Any business found to have infringed these prohibitions can be fined up to 10% of its annual worldwide group turnover, taking into account a range of factors including the seriousness of the infringement and any mitigating or aggravating factors. The CMA also runs a Stop Cartels campaign, which aims to educate businesses about which practices are illegal and urges people to come forward if they suspect a business has taken part in cartel behaviour, such as fixing prices or rigging contracts.Notes for editors Fining water tank firms over £2.6 million after they formed a cartel, agreeing to fix the price of tanks, divide up customers and rig bids for contracts. Anyone who has information about a cartel is encouraged to call the CMA cartels hotline on 020 3738 6888 or email [email protected] The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) is investigating M.G.F. (Trench Construction Systems) Ltd (MGF), Vp plc and Mabey Hire Ltd (Mabey) – 3 major suppliers of groundworks products to the construction industry.The CMA has provisionally found that the 3 businesses formed a cartel to reduce competition and keep prices up. This involved sharing confidential information on pricing and commercial strategy and coordinating their commercial activities. In a Statement of Objections issued today the CMA states its provisional view that Vp and MGF operated the cartel for periods totaling nearly two years and Mabey took part for a single period of 5 months.Groundworks products (including braces, props and sheeting) are used to protect excavations – such as those made for foundations or for laying pipes – from collapse and are important for keeping construction sites safe. The 3 companies supply these products for a range of major housing and road developments, railway line works and water pipe upgrades.The companies’ behaviour came to light after one of the firms blew the whistle and brought information about the conduct to the CMA’s attention. Mabey has confessed its role and will not be fined in accordance with the CMA’s leniency programme – provided it continues to co-operate with the CMA’s investigation.Michael Grenfell, the CMA’s Executive Director for Enforcement, said:last_img read more

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Caffè Nero scraps free staff lunches following NLW

first_imgHigh street coffee chain Caffè Nero has stopped giving its staff free lunches, in response to the National Living Wage (NLW), which came into effect on 1 April.Staff at Caffè Nero have been told they will no longer receive free lunches during their shift because of the NLW.In a statement, the coffee chain warned that the NLW would have a “significant financial impact on the business” and the move was needed in order to keep costs down.However, the coffee retailer has said it will implement the NLW across all staff, including those under 25 who aren’t actually affected by the new law.They will also receive a 65% discount on food, and get free coffee.The Caffè Nero representative said: “All current employees will continue to receive paid breaks, and a substantial discount on food and drink bought when on shift.“Employees currently paid over the National Living Wage have all had a full pay review, and the majority will be receiving a pay increase, depending on their role or situation.“The introduction of a new National Living Wage is a huge potential cost to the business, but also a great opportunity to review pay, and reward employees for their investment in Caffè Nero.”Last month, Caffè Nero came under widespread media criticism for paying no corporation tax in the last financial year, despite posting a profit of almost £23.6m.last_img read more

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Umphrey’s McGee Announces Early Summer Tour Schedule

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee has already spent a great deal of 2017 on the road, but that won’t change later in the year! The band has announced a series of performances set for this summer, starting on May 18th and running through July 8th. Many of the dates include previously announced festival appearances, including Summer Camp Music Festival, Mountain Music Festival, Bonnaroo and Levitate Music Festival, as well as the previously announced three night Red Rocks run over July 4th weekend.However, the tour also reveals a number of new dates, including shows at The NorVa, Pier Six Pavilion, Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom, Augusta Common, Music Farm, and the Central Park Summerstage. Individual shows include support from Aqueous and The Marcus King Band, and the Red Rocks weekend is already loaded with great special guests.Check out the schedule below, and head to the band’s website for details.[Image by Phierce Photo]last_img read more

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