The Floozies & Cherub Join Forces For A Night Of Electrofunk Mayhem In Chicago [Gallery]

first_imgLoad remaining images Two of the hottest names in electro-fueled funk are The Floozies and Cherub, with each band churning out disco grooves for fans everywhere. The bands recently announced a tour together – dubbed the “Your Girlfriend Already Bought Tickets Tour” – and have been getting booties shaking across the country in style.The two bands teamed up at The Riviera Theatre on Friday night, February 10th, performing at the famed Chicago, IL venue to a packed house. It was a non stop dance party! Be sure to not miss The Floozies at the upcoming Fool’s Paradise, along with bands like Lettuce, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, The Motet, Manic Science, Organ Freeman and more – at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre on March 31st & April 1st. More info here.Check out photos of the Chicago show below, courtesy of Phierce Photo.last_img read more

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When Armageddon loomed

first_imgThe black-and-white image is as familiar as it is iconic. The Oval Office photograph captures the solitude and solemnity of the U.S. presidency and the overwhelming sense that the young John F. Kennedy carried the weight of the nation on his ailing back.The picture, taken from behind, shows Kennedy with his head bent and his hands outstretched on his desk. It actually was taken in February 1961, only a month after he took office, yet it would come to symbolize the pressures of the Cuban missile crisis that unfolded more than a year later. The 13-day standoff in October 1962 between the United States and the Soviet Union, which had installed nuclear weapons in Cuba, is when analysts say the world came closest to nuclear Armageddon.The photo, christened “The Loneliest Job” by The New York Times, whose photographer George Tames snapped it, is part of a new website at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) marking the 50th anniversary of the crisis. The site is devoted to providing background on the conflict and encouraging reflection on the lessons learned from an event that eventually was viewed as a deft dance of diplomacy and an enduring teaching tool for current and future leaders.“Because it was, I think everybody agrees, the most dangerous moment that human beings have lived through and survived so far, it has a compelling character,” said Graham Allison, HKS’s Douglas Dillon Professor of Government and director of its Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. “We are very interested as a center and as a School in what lessons you can learn from history that you might apply to help deal with current problems; I think the Cuban missile crisis is an excellent illustration of that.”The site draws from the Belfer Center’s trove of material about the crisis and from other sources. It includes a historical timeline, archival photos, original documents, video clips, an assessment of present nuclear fears, and teaching tools for educators, such as a lesson plan with guiding questions, worksheets and simulations. It also includes lessons learned by key players involved in the incident. Visitors to the site are invited to offer their own lessons gleaned from the dangerous stalemate. In collaboration with Foreign Policy magazine, the Belfer Center is sponsoring an essay contest for students in grades six to 12, for the public, and for international-affairs scholars and practitioners.“We are very interested as a center and as a School in what lessons you can learn from history that you might apply to help deal with current problems; I think the Cuban missile crisis is an excellent illustration of that,” said Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.“The website is designed around the lessons and the learning opportunities,” said James Smith, the Belfer Center’s director of communications, who, together with a team led by Arielle Dworkin, the center’s digital communications manager, helped to develop the site. “We want to remind people that the lessons are still relevant, that there are current crises where the key lessons from the original Cuban missile crisis are still very useful today.”Allison, an authority on the crisis, wrote in the publication Foreign Affairs in June, “The lessons of the crisis for current policy have never been greater.”His 1971 treatise “Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis” is widely credited with transforming the field of international relations. (Based on the release of new material about the crisis, he rewrote the book in 1999 with author Philip Zelikow.) The work explores the nature of the crisis from three decision-making perspectives: the rational actor, governmental politics, and organizational behavior.During an interview in his Harvard office, Allison offered his take on the lessons from the crisis. The first is that nuclear annihilation is possible. In the aftermath of World War II, tensions escalated between the United States and the Soviet Union. As worries and distrust mounted between the two superpowers, so did nuclear arsenals, bomb shelters, and public service announcements that trained countless schoolchildren to take refuge under their desks in a nuclear attack. The crisis in Cuba looked like a struck match.From the outset of the conflict, said Allison, it was clear that both President Kennedy and Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev were “willing to take action that they knew could end in a nuclear war.”Secondly, the world learned that such disaster was preventable, thanks to what Allison calls a “combination of wise policy and good fortune.” Both leaders, he said, “having peered over the precipice and seen and felt what a nuclear war could actually mean, determined first to escape the brink by actions both of them took … and never to go there again.”Their decisions had lasting repercussions. The choices the two men made led to what Kennedy referred to at the time as the “precarious rules of the status quo,” said Allison, to which each subsequent generation has strictly adhered. The U.S. and Soviet leaders who followed assiduously avoided provocations and “surprises that could have ended up in confrontations that could then move inexorably to a nuclear war.”Allison said that while the threats of nuclear terrorist attacks that could devastate a city remain horrific, they are of a scale far smaller than during the Cold War. Then, the world faced a “genuine nuclear war that might have succeeded in extinguishing the species on Earth.” Today the risk of that kind of nuclear annihilation, he added, “has now shrunk to nearly zero.”Of course, the world still has nuclear-armed states to contend with, including the worrying case of Iran, a country many fear is well on its way to developing nuclear weapons. Allison has called the situation in Iran “a Cuban missile crisis in slow motion.” Iran’s leaders insist its interest in nuclear technology is purely to generate energy, but critics point to Iran’s use of deep underground centrifuges used in the production of nuclear fuel as evidence that the country is ramping up its ability to enrich uranium and develop a nuclear weapon.Oct. 23, 1962: U.S. Navy low-level photograph of medium range ballistic missile site in Sagua La Grande, Cuba. Credit: National Security ArchiveIn dealing with Iran, the lessons from the Kennedy administration remain relevant, said Allison. When approaching negotiations with Iran’s leaders, the United States administration should ask itself, “What would Kennedy do?”According to Allison, Kennedy wouldn’t rest until he had the best choice available. Kennedy’s advisers offered him an either-or scenario, to attack Cuba or acquiesce. But Kennedy refused both, judging each option “as bad as the other.” Instead, he “concocted a very imaginative but strange combination,” said Allison, consisting of a public deal (remove your weapons, and we will not invade Cuba), a private ultimatum (you must respond within 24 hours, or we will conduct action ourselves), and a secret sweetener (if the missiles in Cuba were withdrawn, within six months the United States would remove its missiles from Turkey, near the Soviet border).President Barack Obama’s advisers are likely offering him similar advice on Iran, said Allison: “Either you are going to attack Iran to prevent it from acquiring a nuclear bomb, or you are going to acquiesce to Iran becoming a nuclear-armed state.”“The United States will simply have to accept the unacceptable, the recognition that Iran now is capable of enriching uranium and building a bomb,” Allison said, but then added that Washington also can craft a deal reminiscent of Kennedy’s. The Obama administration, Allison said, “should demand as a price for that the supreme leader’s solemn commitment that Iran would never develop a nuclear weapon, combined with transparency measures that would give the United States maximum confidence that they are not cheating, and thereby minimize the likelihood that they decide to cheat, and a credible threat of devastating consequences if Iran violates these terms.”If another foreign conflict is any indication, it appears that Obama may have already learned the lessons of the Cuban crisis. Journalist Michael Lewis’ profile of Obama in October’s Vanity Fair describes how the president grappled with the growing humanitarian crisis in Libya last year as Moammar Gadhafi “and his army of 27,000 men were marching across the desert toward a city called Benghazi and were promising to exterminate some large number of the 1.2 million people inside.”During a meeting of top advisers to explore what Gadhafi might do and how the Pentagon might respond, Lewis wrote, “The Pentagon presented the president with two options: establish a no-fly zone or do nothing at all.” In the end, Obama, after taking the unusual step of turning to junior staffers in the room to solicit their opinions, left the meeting, but not before “he gave his generals two hours to come up with another solution for him to consider.”Like Kennedy 50 years earlier, Obama took the third option — the one that only emerged after he insisted on finding another way.last_img read more

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Chautauqua County Sheriffs Investigate Monday Night House Fire

first_imgMGN Online HARMONY – A residential fire on Blockville-Watts Flats Road Monday evening was caused by an indoor woodstove being left unattended, according to the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Fire Investigation Team. Deputies say a passerby reported the fire at about 8 p.m.No injuries were reported. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),HOPE THE HELL THEY PROSECUTE THE LITTLE BASTARD.last_img

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Clean Hands

first_imgIt is the time of year for visiting pumpkin patches, fall festivals and Christmas tree farms. Many of these venues have petting zoos and sell food products – a combination that is a potential health risk if proper hand washing isn’t included.Visiting a petting zoo can be a memorable family outing, but the facts are that petting zoos and farms can be a source of E. coli transmission. The CDC warns that “when people forget to wash their hands after petting an animal, or bring food or drinks into an area where animals are exhibited, they are at risk for becoming ill.”University of Georgia Cooperative Extension advises parents and teachers to help keep children safe by following these recommendations from the CDC:Visit hand washing stations at petting zoos, festival locations and farms.Always make sure that children wash their hands right after petting animals or touching pens, cages, etc., where animals are housed.Even if children do not touch the animals, they should wash their hands after exiting the animal holding areas.Always wash hands before touching food or drinking, before preparing food or drinks, and after removing soiled clothing or shoes after visiting farms or petting zoos.Keep food and drinks out of areas where animals are held.Prepare, serve and eat food only in areas where animals are not permitted.Do not eat or drink raw, unpasteurized juices, cider, milk or cheeses.Constantly supervise children less than 5 years of age while in animal holding areas.Do not allow children to put thumbs, fingers, pacifiers or other objects in their mouths while in the animal areas.Do not take strollers, bottles, pacifiers, cups or toys into animal areas.Supervise children’s hand washing.According to the CDC, hand washing with soap and running water is best. Hands should be washed with soap and running water for at least 20 seconds. Pay special attention to the area between fingers and around fingernails.If these are unavailable, use hand sanitizers, but wash hands well as soon as a sink and soap are available.For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/features/animalexhibits/.last_img read more

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Cops Seek Driver Who Fled Man Falling from Moving SUV

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Thomas HendricksSuffolk County police are looking for the driver who fled the scene after a 20-year-old man fell from the driver’s moving vehicle in West Babylon and later died last month.Witnesses told investigators that they saw Thomas Hendricks of Farmingdale fall from a northbound light-colored Ford Explorer on Belmont Avenue at the Southern State Parkway westbound exit ramp at 10:10 p.m. Nov. 10, police said.Hendricks was seen at the Cloverdale Apartments on Great Neck Road in North Amityville, where authorities said he was known to frequent. The victim had been picked up by the SUV on Route 110 near the parkway 20 minutes prior, witnesses reportedly told police.Hendricks was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, where he was pronounced dead the following day. Vehicular Crime Unit detectives are continuing the investigation.Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to an arrest. Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Apple Pay gets high marks from early users

first_imgby: Brian DayApple Pay has yet to gain widespread adoption among iPhone 6 owners. This is likely due to two factors: 1) poor consumer awareness of which stores accept near field communication (NFC) payments technology, and 2) a lack of understanding of how it works.According to a recent InfoScout survey, 1 in 10 of iPhone 6 users surveyed have used Apple Pay to make a payment and just under 5 percent made an Apple Pay purchase during the 2014 holiday season. Considering the innovation had only just reached consumers in October 2014, these are significant numbers.What’s more, the study found those who have used Apple Pay gave it high marks. Compared to using a traditional payment card, 73 percent of said Apple Pay had better ease of use; 67 percent said it had greater speed at checkout; 67 percent said it had better security; and 67 percent said it offered more convenience.When it comes to the reasons why consumers didn’t use Apple Pay during the holidays, 31 percent indicated they didn’t know whether or not the store accepted it; 25 percent said they forgot to use it; and 19 percent said their phone wasn’t within easy reach. Additionally, 6 percent cited being motivated by rewards for using a different payment method, while another 6 percent said it was too time consuming. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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No-tricks overdraft strategy

first_img This post is currently collecting data… This is placeholder text After living through the financial upheavals and a general sense of uncertainty over the past eight months, consumers are feeling a bit of fright—and it isn’t because Halloween is just around the corner. Dealing with ongoing financial challenges is scary for consumers who have lost their job, have seen their hours decreased or who worry about what the upcoming months may bring as they try to stay afloat financially. As they look for resources and advice on how to pay their bills and take care of their families, many consumers depend on overdraft protection provided by their financial institution. But just like the contrast between fresh caramel apples and last year’s trick-or-treat candy when you remove the wrapper, not all overdraft programs offer the same satisfying solution. Offer a mystery-free, reliable choice With nothing to hide, a fully transparent overdraft program, that is based on fixed limits, provides members with upfront disclosures that describe how the program works and how much it costs to use the privilege. This allows an individual to make an informed choice regarding whether or not to use the service when an unexpected expense occurs that exceeds his or her account balance. At any time, the member can opt out of coverage and best of all, there are no shocking unknowns that could add to an already stressful situation.Plus, by addressing all of the guidance and industry regulations introduced since 2005, a fully disclosed program also provides your credit union with compliance peace of mind and other advantages, such as:a 100% compliance guarantee and advice on best practices;ongoing program monitoring, including quarterly reviews and annual on-site visits; extensive training to increase understanding of how the program works and its value to members;in-depth account tracking, data analysis and reporting to reduce charge-offs;compliance-tested messaging to simplify the communications process; andaccess to periodic program updates and analytics to improve program management.Watch out for solutions that are full of tricksOn the other hand, overdraft programs that are matrix-based, with dynamic limits that are established using mysterious algorithms that change on a daily basis, do not provide on-going confidence or financial security for your members. These types of programs also can put your credit union at a potentially higher compliance risk because important information isn’t disclosed to members and the rules don’t apply to everyone equally.And, because the program is secretive, other concerns could haunt you and overshadow your member service quality, including:members don’t know their limit, or if they even have one; they can’t rely on when an item will be paid and when it will not;they can’t opt out because the program is undisclosed;employees can’t explain the program to members because the information is confusing and inconsistent; andyou could be subject to increased scrutiny of discrimination or unfair practices if the program has a disproportionate impact on some members.Beware of haunting practices monitored by regulatorsWith all of the unknowns you are dealing with amid changes in how to effectively provide service during the pandemic, it’s imperative that you maintain awareness of the issues that remain on regulators’ radar. While no new regulations on overdraft programs are currently in play, issues related to Reg E and opt-in disclosures for one-time ATM and debit transactions remain a focus. When steps aren’t taken to ensure that program procedures follow best practices and are properly disclosed, or financial institutions violate regulations on when fees can be charged on electronic transactions, there is a price to pay—through regulatory consent orders, fines and potential class action lawsuits. Not to mention the reputational damage these actions can cause.Additionally, it’s imperative not to take for granted that your members are aware of your overdraft solution or understand how your program works. They might be wondering about it but forget to ask or feel too intimidated if they aren’t familiar with your frontline staff.Don’t be tricked by “plug and play” solutions As the number of unemployment claims continues to be worrisome, some households are being impacted economically much more than others. Consumers who are facing these challenges continue to contend with many unknowns. They need the option of an overdraft solution that is easily understood and reliable—not a non-disclosed product that sends chills up their spines.If you’re looking for a fully compliant—no hocus pocus—approach to helping your members safely cover their occasional financial shortfalls, a transparent overdraft service will provide the most satisfactory results for your members. And a solution that provides contingency-based pricing prioritizes your success.Remove the mystery for total satisfactionDoes your overdraft program offer your members a transparent option when they need a financial safety net, or does it leave them in the dark?When members are confident that they’re getting consistent information about their account status—whether through electronic or face-to-face communication with frontline personnel—their confidence increases. When they know they can rely on the support they receive from their credit union to get them through their short-term financial needs, their satisfaction and loyalty will be revealed for all to see.center_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Cheryl Lawson Cheryl has more than 30 years of experience in financial operations, consulting, communications, training and project management. She joined JMFA in 2001 and currently serves as the compliance liaison for … Web: www.jmfa.com Detailslast_img read more

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Gareth Southgate: England boss confirms he had coronavirus | Football News

first_imgYouri Tielemans’ deflected drive on 10 minutes got the hosts off to a fast start in Leuven and, after England passed up a couple of good opportunities to hit back immediately, Dries Mertens (23) clipped home a fine free-kick after a controversial foul was called against Declan Rice.England spent most of the remainder of the match on the front foot, with half-chances falling to Mason Mount, Jack Grealish and Harry Kane who, on his 50th appearance for his country, had seen an earlier header cleared off the line by Romelu Lukaku.Belgium 2-0 England – Nations League reportWhat is England’s best formation? Southgate, speaking after Sunday’s 2-0 defeat to Belgium in the Nations League, said he had fully recovered from the virus.“I did have the virus, I was fortunate enough not to have had it as seriously as so many people in our country,” said the England manager.“But it wasn’t pleasant or something you’d choose to have. Everything is fine now.”- Advertisement – 2:00 5:19 Highlights of the Nations League Group A2 match between Belgium and England preview image Jamie Redknapp and Ashley Cole analyse England’s selection and formation problems after their Nations League hopes were ended by Belgium – Advertisement – England players and staff are regularly tested for coronavirus and Southgate has reportedly returned numerous negative tests.Belgium end England’s Nations League hopesEngland’s hopes of making back-to-back Nations League finals are over after they fell to a 2-0 defeat away to world No 1 side Belgium.  Is 3-4-3 the answer for England? That was the question put to the England manager, his captain and the Sky Sports pundits after the team’s Nations League hopes were ended with a 2-0 defeat away to Belgium on Sunday.In the aftermath of the defeat, there was debate over whether England need a three-man defence, if their midfield personnel is suitable for the formation and what they need in attack to hit the net against the world’s best sides. England manager Gareth Southgate has confirmed he had coronavirus but says his symptoms were only mild.Reports emerged over the weekend that Southgate had privately battled with the disease last month, keeping the news of his positive test a secret from any of his England players.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Disparity between what bank gives out

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion It was heartwarming to see on your May 5 Business page that Trustco recently donated $500,000 to the Albany Medical Center. Just this same week, they gave me 3 cents interest on my savings account.Ken BressScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img

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Norwegian Air brings back more crew, aircraft as demand rises after lockdown

first_imgMore than 300 pilots and 600 cabin crew from the company’s bases in Norway will operate 20 aircraft, with about 200 pilots and 400 cabin crew being brought back from layoffs, the budget carrier said.Norwegian furloughed or laid off about 7,300 staff, roughly 90% of its employees, after the COVID-19 outbreak.On Tuesday Norwegian said it would resume flights outside Norway, announcing a single domestic route in Denmark, while Nordic rival SAS also announced an expansion of service.Norwegian completed a financial restructuring last month, handing control of the firm to its creditors, saying at the time it could wait until 2021 before resuming flights beyond Norway’s borders.”The reopening of flights is the result of recent increased demand from customers and is also in line with other airlines across Europe that are also resuming flights,” Norwegian said.The airline, which brought Europe’s low-cost business model to the transatlantic market, has said it plans to reinvent itself in a scaled-down version with 110-120 aircraft, compared with almost 150 before the pandemic.Topics : Norwegian Air will resume flights on 76 routes halted during the coronavirus outbreak and bring back into service 12 of its mothballed aircraft on top of the eight already flying, as European countries reopen and demand for flights rises.Airlines have been hit hard by the pandemic, which has put a stop to most international travel, leading companies to seek help from governments.”We’re getting back in the air with more planes and we’re reopening many of the routes which our customers have requested,” Chief Executive Jacob Schram said in a statement.last_img read more

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