Haarms scores 21 to carry BYU over Loyola Marymount 88-71

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOS ANGELES (AP) — Matt Haarms had 21 points as BYU beat Loyola Marymount 88-71.Ivan Alipiev led the Lions with a season-high 22 points. February 20, 2021 /Sports News – Local Haarms scores 21 to carry BYU over Loyola Marymount 88-71 Tags: BYU Cougars Basketball/Matt Haarms/WCC Associated Presslast_img

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Former Countrywide boss reveals his thoughts on LSL takeover

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Former Countrywide boss reveals his thoughts on LSL takeover previous nextAgencies & PeopleFormer Countrywide boss reveals his thoughts on LSL takeoverJohn Hards gives his views on what the future holds for his former colleagues following the expected acquisition of Countrywide later this month.Nigel Lewis16th March 20201 Comment1,298 Views Former Countrywide lettings boss John Hards has revealed his thoughts on the future of the Countrywide brands following the company’s expected acquisition by LSL, and hinted that he doesn’t expect a significant headcount reduction.“I say to any Countrywide staff who might be nervous about their future at the company following a deal – if you’re good at what you do then LSL will want to keep you,” he says.Now working as a consultant and speaking at his Cornish home, Hards says he endorses the takeover of Countrywide by LSL but admits it will be hard to achieve, although he wishes he was still there to be part of the ‘fun as well as the hard work’.He also expects that LSL will, after a review, keep all the Countrywide brands, arguing that the company has got rid of brands in the past, but that it ‘did not help the business’.Hards also says that, although the Platt years saw many middle managers leave as her ‘retail’ approach blew in, it has allowed a fresh batch of new faces to rapidly gain experience and take on wider responsibilities.“I think these Countrywide people could teach the LSL team a thing or two,” he says.Hards also says that Countrywide MD Paul Creffield should keep a senior role within the new set up, assuming the acquisition goes ahead.“His experience is unquestionable, as is his knowledge of the business,” he says. “But who else makes it on to the board of the two merged companies will be the contentious bit.”Hards left Countrywide in 2017 after a 35 year career at the firm but returned in 2018 to steer the company through the tenant fees ban.  John Hards LSL Countrywide March 16, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 16th March 2020 at 4:52 pmI need some help here – if the now dead in the water – LSL hostile bid had taken place John Hards feels that Paul Creffield would have been the right man to sit in a joint boardroom, steering the two merged companies into the 2020’s?Is this the same Mr Creffield who allowed Countrywide to be fined over £100,000 in fines and costs, due to their mismanagement of lettings funds, the £10,000,000 in the wrong account fiasco.What came out of that horror show was the arrogant stance that Mr Creffield took, rather than being contrite, if you read all of the documentation on the case, it seems unless I have got it totally wrong, Countrywide between 2008 and 2018 had in place a policy agreed at CEO level to keep the untraceable lettings funds in the company account, all 10M of it, rather then keep it safe in a separate account, from which the funds should have been distributed elsewhere.Paul Creffield when alerted to it, fully co-operated with the RICS investigation, but – Paul Creffield did not become CEO, discover the deceit, and then report it as a whistle- blower. No it was an outside audit that picked up on the situation, which if let undetected may well have continued.In fact if you look closely at Paul’s statement in mitigation he seems very much to make the case that because Countrywide does billions of pounds worth of mortgages a year, have a massive RICs prescence, and has a huge 800 (?) strong office presence with many branches in all the towns and villages, it would be a travesty if Countrywide were too badly damaged by the affair as it would possibly upset the property industry as a whole. (TOO BIG TO FAIL).In other words – Countrywide had in place by its own admission a questionable practice, the internal transfer of client funds, which was company policy. Then by chance an outsider found out about it, and of course if your are the CEO of the day you are going to be as helpful as you can, but I think that to play the card of Too big to fail, is a dangerous one – especially now.Because if Countrywide is founded upon financial services and has within in very notable and trustworthy RICS personnel, shouldn’t the bar be set higher rather than lower, as a warning to all. The panel in their judgement under mitigating and aggravating matters, actually states that Countrywide were using the fund to inflate their profit provision.As a matter of balance I am told by those who know that Paul is a very good at what he does, but I wonder if the matter had not come to light, would anyone at Countrywide have seized the nettle.Also where did this leave the likes of former CEO’s Alison Platt (90% fall in the share price) for example, and the auditors and the Chief financial officers?My advice get some fresh blood, someone who is younger, who knows about agency, people, technology and does not come from Tescos. You know where I am.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Couple Failed To Resolve The Issue Of The Legal Status Of Their Marriage For…

first_imgCouple Failed To Resolve The Legal Status Of Their Marriage For 40 YearsOlivia Covington for www.theindianalawyer.comThe purported ex-wife of a now-deceased man cannot proceed with her election against the man’s will because the couple failed to resolve the issue of the legal status of their marriage for more than 40 years, thus barring her claim under the doctrine of laches, the Indiana Court of Appeals has ruled.One year after their marriage in April 1968, Leon and Milana Riggs separated and were issued a divorce decree in Mexico. The couple stopped living together in 1969, and beginning in 1970, Leon Riggs’ tax filing status was single.Then in 1973, Milana Riggs filed an Indiana petition to dissolve the marriage, while her purported ex-husband filed a cross-claim seeking the same relief and declaratory judgment as to the validity of the Mexican divorce decree. However, none of those actions were ever resolved, leaving the question regarding the validity of the Mexican decree unresolved.Milana Riggs then filed a second petition to dissolve the marriage in 2015, but by that point Leon Riggs suffered from dementia and was not competent to participate in the action. He died before the dissolution decree was entered, so the Marion Superior Court dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.Shortly after Leon Riggs’ death, his ex-wife filed an election to take against his will, claiming she was married to him at the time of his death, renouncing all provisions in his will and electing to take her legal share in the estate. She also filed claims against the estate for compensation.But Cynthia Hill, Leon’s daughter who had been appointed personal representative of her father’s estate, filed a motion to strike Milana Riggs’ election against the will, which the probate court treated as a motion for summary judgment under the equitable doctrines of laches, unclean hands and equitable estoppel. Hill also moved to strike Milana Riggs’ affidavit and deposition, which the ex-wife had designated in opposition to summary judgment, pursuant to the Indiana Dead Man’s Statute.Milana Riggs then filed a cross-motion for summary judgment in which she claimed, among other things, that Hill was estopped from arguing the Mexican divorce decree was valid. But in granting Hill’s motions and denying Milana Riggs’ motions, the probate court concluded its role was not to determine the validity of the Mexican decree, but rather whether the parties were barred from seeking or contesting the spousal election. The court then determined Milana Riggs’ claims was barred by the doctrine of laches.Milana Riggs appealed in Milana Staletovich Riggs v. Cynthia Hill, in her capacity as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Leon O. Riggs, 49A02-1703-EU0458, arguing first that the probate court erred in granting Hill’s motion to strike Milana Riggs’ affidavit and deposition.  But Indiana Court of Appeals Judge John Baker, writing in a Tuesday opinion, disagreed, pointing to the decision in In Re Sutherland’s Estate, 204 N.E.2d 520 (Ind. 1965).In that case, the Supreme Court determined the “Dead Man’s Statute prohibits the testimony of an alleged surviving spouse about her relationship with the decedent where she is seeking to inherit a portion of the decedent’s estate.” Because the Supreme Court still considers Sutherland to be good law, it was not erroneous for the probate court to grant the motion to strike under that statute, Baker wrote.The appellate court also affirmed the grant of summary judgment to Hill, with Baker writing that “(46) years is an inexcusable delay for Milana to assert her rights as Leon’s legal spouse” and that Milana Riggs had acquiesced to the legally unsettled nature of her relationship with her deceased husband. Thus, the doctrine of laches applies, the judges held.Finally, the appellate court declined to apply judicial estoppel against the estate’s argument that Leon Milana Riggs was not married at the time of his death, because no such argument was made. Rather, Hill consistently maintained the validity of the Mexican document was not relevant to the case, Baker wrote. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Bakers’ Fair is a spring success

first_imgBakers’ Fair Spring was a great success on Sunday, with a huge numbers of visitors from across the country making the trip to Newbury Racecourse.Linda Lusardi received a warm welcome from both visitors and exhibitors, before she took to the stage to announce the winners of the National Association of Master Bakers’ Bakery Competitions, and the bakers versus butchers classes.The Stage saw a wide range of talks and demonstrations, with Baking Industry Awards Confectioner of the Year Mark Legg, of Dunn’s Bakery, kicking off proceedings. Talks also came from both Sara Reid and Colin Lomax of Rank Hovis, and Baking Industry Awards Celebration Cake Maker of the Year Amelia Nutting, Shugabudz, demonstrated a number of the techniques she used to create her winning cake.National Cupcake Champion 2009 Kevin Sibley, also took the crowds through how to make his winning Black Forest Gateau recipe.Among the winning firms in the bakery competitions were: David Jenkins, Greenhalgh’s, Dunn’s Bakery and Brucciani (Midlands). For a full list of all the winners and a review of the event, see the next issue of British Baker, out 22 April.last_img read more

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Dying stars source of life?

first_imgEven dying stars could host planets with life — and if such life exists, we might be able to detect it within the next decade.This encouraging result comes from a new theoretical study of Earth-like planets orbiting white dwarf stars. Researchers found that oxygen in the atmosphere of a white dwarf’s planet could be detected much more easily than in an Earth-like planet orbiting a sunlike star.“In the quest for extraterrestrial biological signatures, the first stars we study should be white dwarfs,” said Avi Loeb, theorist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and director of the Institute for Theory and Computation.When a star like the sun dies, it puffs off its outer layers, leaving behind a hot core called a white dwarf. A typical white dwarf is about the size of Earth. It slowly cools and fades over time, but it can retain heat long enough to warm a nearby world for billions of years.Before a star becomes a white dwarf it swells into a red giant, engulfing and destroying any nearby planets, so a planet would have to arrive in the habitable zone after the star evolved into a white dwarf. A planet could form from leftover dust and gas (making it a second-generation world), or migrate inward from farther away.The abundance of heavy elements on the surface of white dwarfs suggests that a significant fraction of them have rocky planets in their orbit. Loeb and his colleague Dan Maoz of Tel Aviv University estimate that a survey of the 500 closest white dwarfs could reveal one or more habitable Earths.The best method for finding such planets is a transit search — looking for a star that dims as an orbiting planet crosses in front of it. Since a white dwarf is about the same size as Earth, an Earth-sized planet would block a large fraction of its light and create an obvious signal.Researchers can study the atmospheres of transiting planets because as the white dwarf’s light shines through the ring of air that surrounds the planet’s silhouetted disk, the atmosphere absorbs some starlight. This leaves chemical fingerprints that indicate whether that air contains water vapor, or even signatures of life, such as oxygen.Astronomers are particularly interested in finding oxygen because the oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere is continuously replenished, through photosynthesis, by plant life.Thus, the presence of large quantities of oxygen in the atmosphere of a distant planet would signal the likely presence of life there.NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch by the end of this decade, promises to sniff out the gases of these alien worlds. Loeb and Maoz created a synthetic spectrum replicating what JWST would see if it examined a habitable planet orbiting a white dwarf. They found that both oxygen and water vapor would be detectable with only a few hours of total observation time.“JWST offers the best hope of finding an inhabited planet in the near future,” said Maoz.Their paper was accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and will be available online.For more information, the full release can be found on the CfA website.last_img read more

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#83: Dell EMC World 2017 Day 1 with Gaurav Chand

first_imgDell EMC The Source Podcast #83: Dell EMC World 2017 Day 1 with Gaurav ChandSPECIAL REPORT: Dell EMC World 2017 day 1. After this morning’s Realize Your Digital Future Keynote featuring Michael Dell, David Goulden and David Blaine, I had the privilege to sit down with the Gaurav Chand (@gcatdell) Senior VP Dell EMC Global Solutions.We talked Dell Technologies and enabling transformation, Digital, IT, Security, Workforce all connected via the Internet of Things.Be sure to follow #DellEMCWorld and catch the Keynote sessions live at www.DellEMCWorld.com/Live.Don’t miss “Dell EMC The Source” app in the App Store.  Be sure to subscribe to Dell EMC The Source Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play and visit the official blog at thesourceblog.emc.comEMC: The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)The Source Podcast: Episode #83: Dell EMC World 2017 Day 1 with Gaurav ChandAudio Playerhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/thesource/EMC_The_Source_Episode_83_audio.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Don’t miss “Dell EMC The Source” app in the App Store. Be sure to subscribe to Dell EMC The Source Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play and visit the official blog at thesourceblog.emc.comEMC: The Source Podcast is hosted By Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

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Shuffle Along’s George C. Wolfe & Savion Glover on Collaborating Again, Capturing the Spirit of the ‘20s & More

first_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on July 24, 2016 Related Shows Shuffle Alongcenter_img With a trio of Tony winners and a pair of Tony nominees above the title, Shuffle Along boasts the Broadway season’s starriest lineup. But two of the show’s most celebrated names never appear on stage. The director and book writer of this jazzy “musical sensation” is George C. Wolfe, whose productions of Jelly’s Last Jam, Angels in America, Caroline, or Change and The Normal Heart, among many others, secured his spot as one of the theater’s all-time greats. Adding to the excitement is the Broadway return of the brilliant choreographer Savion Glover, whose partnership with Wolfe on Bring in ’Da Noise, Bring in ’Da Funk earned Tonys for both men. That was 20 years ago, but Wolfe and Glover remain a dream team, and just before opening night, they shared a teasing banter as they discussed their past, present and future collaborations—including why Savion is not in the cast of Shuffle Along.Q: Seeing the two of you sitting here feels like Broadway history coming to life. What do you love about working together?SAVION: For me, it’s just being around George. Although I am choreographing, every opportunity to be in his presence is a learning opportunity. I like learning, and who better to learn from than someone as handsome as this man!GEORGE: The main thing I love about Savion is that he is not “precious” about the work. The worst thing when you’re working is to say, “I have a question,” and the other person goes, “No! This is what it is.” That kind of rigidity is very challenging because musicals are constantly mutating. I can throw something at him, and he’ll say, “OK, what about this?” That level of generosity ends up living in the material, and the audience picks up on the spirit in which the show was created. It takes an incredibly evolved skill set to be as flexible as Savion.Q: You’ve known each other for almost 25 years—since Savion played the younger version of Jelly Roll Morton in Jelly’s Last Jam. GEORGE: He wasn’t that young! He just ages well. He’s really 79. He’s older than me.SAVION: I think our relationship has matured over the years. I can relate to him now as a grown man, versus a youngster.GEORGE: How old were you in Jelly?​SAVION: I was finishing high school. I remember turning 21 on the tour. That was a great birthday.Q: Savion is known for his dynamic, athletic style of tapping. What was it like creating dances set to 1920s jazz?SAVION: Well, I love period music. We aren’t creating anything new here; it’s some of the same moves we’ve seen in the past, but with my energy—it’s a ‘20s feel with a twist of today’s energy.GEORGE: That’s 100 percent wrong. What he’s doing is new. It’s completely and totally new, in the same way that Shuffle Along was new and startling in 1921. White downtown Broadway had never seen a show like this. They’d never seen dancing or heard music like this, not just jazz but syncopation. His choreography has the spirit of the ‘20s and also the spirit of something raw and contemporary because the rhythm is continuous.Q: What’s it like to choreograph for stars who haven’t been known for their dancing, like Audra McDonald and Brian Stokes Mitchell?SAVION: Very satisfying. I remember going into the room and saying, “OK, we’re going to do this, and I can give you the simplified version.” They always said, “No, give us the hard version. Give us the real deal.” They all stepped up.GEORGE: They would say [in the beginning], “I don’t know what the hell I’m doing now, but come March, I will.”SAVION: And they did. They would try certain things one week, and two or three weeks later, the choreography would be embodied through the acting and everything else. It was a lot of fun for me.Q: Let’s address an obvious question: Savion, did you ever consider appearing in Shuffle Along?SAVION: Yes, I did.Q: Why did you decide not to?GEORGE: Because someone said, “You’re not going to be in the show.” And that was me.SAVION: In the beginning, I thought I was going to be in the show. After maybe our third meeting, I realized…GEORGE: …I said it in the first meeting because I know you.SAVION: He may have said it, but I didn’t hear it.GEORGE: It’s a monster, monster show! Let me ask you a question. Could you have been in it? In previews?SAVION: Choreographed it and been in it? Probably not.GEORGE: Thank you!SAVION: I know two spots. I could do the William Still role, and I could do the Baby C role [musical numbers featuring ensemble dancers Phillip Attmore and Curtis Holland].GEORGE: At some point, one of those dancers is going to be tied up in the closet and Savion is going to walk onstage and do the number. That will happen.SAVION: We just don’t know when.Q: How about a revival of Jelly’s Last Jam, starring Savion in the role created by Gregory Hines?SAVION: Yes, that’s on my palette.GEORGE: He’s working on that, too, and I have to direct it. He should do Jelly. Definitely, without question. That one, you could choreograph and be in it.SAVION: Yeah, because I can do improvisation with the solo stuff.Q: Savion, you haven’t worked on Broadway in 20 years. Did you consciously step away?SAVION: I’ve had requests to do things over the years, but I don’t want to be the Cat in the Hat in Seussical. I create dance projects and continue to bring awareness to the dance until something worth my integrity comes about.Q: You must have had other opportunities to choreograph on Broadway. SAVION: No, I didn’t, actually. I just was developing my own productions and tours.Q: You also run a dance school in Newark. Why is teaching important to you? SAVION: That’s who I am. My mother always taught us that the more you know, the more you should share. It’s in the building where I first studied—when it was Newark Community School of the Arts. One day a friend said, “This building is for sale,” and we bought it. when it was Newark Community School of the Arts. One day a friend said, “This building is for sale,” and we bought it.GEORGE: I didn’t know you had gone there as a kid. Wow, that’s wonderful.Q: George, it’s been 12 years since you directed Caroline, or Change on Broadway. Have you missed musicals?​GEORGE: What’s that Larry Gelbart line? “Wherever Hitler is, I hope he’s out of town with a musical.” I absolutely love working on musicals, but anytime I finish a project I want to move on to something completely different. When I did Lucky Guy, Nora Ephron’s play, I thought, “I miss that seedy, dangerous world of New York in the ‘80s. Let me go live there.” What is the exact opposite of that? A 1921 New York musical. I’ve been thinking about Shuffle Along off and on for a period of time, and then some part of me said, “The time for this is now.”Q: This has been a busy season for musicals. Has either of you seen Hamilton? SAVION: I have not.GEORGE: No.Q: Are you interested in seeing it?GEORGE: Yeah! But we’ve been in an intense cave [of preparation] since last summer, and once I start to immerse yourself in this world, I can’t watch any bad TV, I can’t read books, I can’t see anything that’s going to take me out of it. I adjust my rhythms and don’t let anything contaminate it. Now that we’re opening, I will be able to see musicals.Q: What do you hope audiences will take away from Shuffle Along? And now that it’s done, what do you love most about it?GEORGE: At the end of the day, Shuffle Along is about people coming together and making something extraordinary—and history not necessarily being kind to them. It’s about the love of necessarily being kind to them. It’s about the love of doing, regardless of the consequences. And ultimately, it’s about something we all care about, which is, “Will I be remembered for what I did?” Everybody wants to be remembered for the best of who they are.SAVION: I love everything about this show. My favorite piece is “Struttin’,” which was my first opportunity to choreograph something that has nothing to do with tap dancing. George pushed me, and I accepted the challenge. I’m just overwhelmingly happy and proud to be part of this project. George C. Wolfe & Savion Glover photographed in the PHD Terrace at Dream Midtown(Photo: Caitlin McNaney)last_img read more

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Lansing muni remains committed to coal phase-out

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Lansing City Pulse:A new rule proposed by the federal Environmental Protection Agency last week would ease pollution restrictions and squeeze more life out of the nation’s aging fleet of coal-fired power plants, but the rule will have no effect on Lansing, according to [Board of Water & Light] General Manager Dick Peffley.“We don’t plan on making any changes,” Peffley said. “We want to be out of the coal business here in Lansing by 2025. Eckert Station will still close at the end of 2020 and Erickson by 2025. Those plans are set in place.”The new rule would allow utilities to refurbish or upgrade aging coal-fired plants without having to install costly pollution control equipment, but Peffley said the BWL’s two coal plants are past the point of no return.“We’ve already scaled back our maintenance and capital improvements in the plants,” he said. “They don’t have 10 years left in them. You don’t want to fill the gas tank and overhaul the engine for a car that’s going to the junkyard.”Peffley said the BWL is not interested in buying into the regulatory “flavor of the month.” The utility’s portfolio has shifted definitively from coal to gas and renewables, anchored by the REO Town Cogeneration Plant, built in 2013, and a $500 million new gas plant, scheduled to break ground next year. The BWL is committed to 80 percent reduction in its carbon footprint by 2025.“We saw the path the Obama administration was going down, and it aligned with the closing of our plants through age, so we picked this path and stuck with it,” Peffley said. “This new change in rules could benefit some utilities around the country, but it’s definitely not going to help us.”More: BWL sticking with no-coal future Lansing muni remains committed to coal phase-outlast_img read more

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Working with millennials and more

first_imgI mentor a couple of Florida State University and Harvard students as well as some graduates. My No. 1 piece of advice: Have a can-do attitude.Here is a list I recently shared on my Twitter account for millennials, and everyone else, of pieces of advice that require ZERO talent:Be on time;Have a solid work ethic and put in your best effort;Display plenty of energy and enthusiasm;Maintain a positive attitude;Be passionate;Be a supportive teammate; andRemain coachable.An article on FORTUNE recently shared additional advice about how millennials can achieve success in the workplace. “Millennials can face unique challenges in establishing their personal brands, especially within large, multi-generational companies,” wrote Drew Saad, head of strategic planning and execution at Farmers Insurance. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Bandera family to host annual Christmas dinner at 3 locations

first_imgThe Bandera family hosts its’ “Bandera Family Christmas Dinner” every year. This will be the 30th dinner. (WBNG) — The Bandera family will be hosting three dinners on Christmas Day. American Legion Post 80 — 76 Main St., Binghamton — 12 to 3 p.m.American Legion Post 189 — 29 Sheldon St., Norwich — 1 to 4 p.m.Saint Ambrose Church School Cafeteria — 203 Washington Ave., Endicott — 12 to 3 p.m. center_img Locations include:last_img

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