Fine structure of a terrestrial cyanobacterial mat from Antarctica

first_imgThe fine structure of a cyanobacterial mat collected from the fellfield ecosystems of Signy Island, Antarctica, was examined using some novel light and scanning electron microscope techniques. The mat was up to 5 mm thick and was distinctly layered. The surface of the mat consisted of nonliving material above a zone of Phormidium autumnale (Ag.) Gom. filaments. We suggest that the surface layer protects the cyanobacterium from the effects of desiccation or high irradiance. Lower layers were less structured than the upper layer and included other taxa of cynobacteria and eukaryotic algae, although still dominated by Phormidium. The lowest layers consisted of dead organic material. The mat bound large amounts of inorganic material within and between the subsurface layers.last_img

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NCAA delays date for NBA draft entrants to return to school

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailINDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The NCAA is pushing back its deadline for early entrants to the NBA draft to withdraw and return to school.But it will wait to determine a new date. The deadline was originally June 3. That would’ve come 10 days after the completion of the NBA scouting combine. But the NBA announced earlier this month that it was postponing the draft lottery and combine scheduled for Chicago this month.NCAA senior vice president of basketball Dan Gavitt said in a statement that the NCAA won’t set a new date until the NBA has determined its timeline for the predraft process. Associated Press May 14, 2020 /Coronavirus (COVID-19) related news and sports stories, Sports News – Local NCAA delays date for NBA draft entrants to return to school Written by Tags: Coronavirus/COVID-19/NBA/NBA Draft/NCAAlast_img read more

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Students attack college welfare ‘lottery’

first_imgDisturbing disparities have emerged in the quality of welfare and pastoral care provided by different colleges.While some students have said that they are entirely satisfied with their college’s welfare provision, others have expressed deep concern with the way welfare is handled by their colleges.One student at St Hilda’s said, “Hilda’s welfare is only structured to ensure the best results possible.”She complained that moral tutors, whose responsibility is to look after the welfare of students, were sometimes far more concerned with their academic success.“It’s not about what’s best for Hilda’s students but about what’s best for exam results. Several other people from my year feel quite afraid of their moral tutors.“Unless you’re getting firsts they take the opportunities they see to tell you you’re not good enough, even if you’re doing well for you.”She described how her own moral tutor had criticised her decision to stay away from Oxford for a few days to deal with family issues on academic grounds, even though she had missed no tutorials.“She sent me a really unpleasant email about getting my priorities straight… It implied that I’d been deliberately shirking my work and I didn’t have a good reason which is obviously really unpleasant.”Madgalen students have also complained that, in some cases, they do not even have pastoral tutors.One fourth year said, “we don’t even pastoral tutors. Or if we do, I have no idea who mine is. I really just don’t have anyone to go to if I’m having problems with my work. At the moment I’m not that happy about how my degree is going, but I can’t talk to my tutors about it because I’m worried they’ll give me bad references for jobs if I’m negative about my subject.“I’d never feel comfortable talking to peer support people – if I needed to talk to someone of my own age I’d just go friends.” OUSU VP for Welfare, Rosanna McBeath expressed her concern about the college welfare lottery. She said that basic welfare provision is the responsibility of each college. As a result, “nobody knows exactly what each college provides – only welfare officers do. This shouldn’t be a lottery.”Colleges are also plagued by failure to inform the students about their welfare provision. There is a “lack of clarity” as to where to go when there is a problem.Sarah Bainbridge, Mansfield’s JCR president, when asked to whom a student can turn in case of a problem said, “there are different people for different things… We have a list of people whom to contact.”In Blackfriars, the student welfare provision consists of the Dean and the Visiting Student Coordinator. Blackfriars’ website refers undergraduates seeking help to university services. Their code of practice stipulates to “contact the Harassment Officer whose name is advertised in the JCR.” No telephone contact numbers are listed as well as no information on how to obtain welfare supplies.Welfare provision is often limited by college finances. Mansfield, one of the poorest colleges, has had no trained peer supporters for two years. Only this Hilary Term training have been re-introduced for six JCR members.In colleges such as Regent’s Park and Merton the first point of call is the Chaplain. This raises concerns whether non-Christians would feel comfortable discussing their welfare with a religious person.Some, however, think the religiosity of Chaplain may be an asset when dealing with welfare. Aisha Danga, a LMH student, said “I’ve been talking to the chaplain and he’s excellent. He just makes you talk. He’s a chaplain, he’s close to God and you feel like he understands.”Other students have praised college welfare procedures. Female Welfare Rep at Merton College said, “our welfare divides between the Dean and the Chaplain who actually is responsible for welfare. Hence disciplinary procedures and welfare do not conflict.” An Exeter student said that he thought the colleges provision was “fantastic.” He added, “everyone’s really happy.”A University spokesperson said, “colleges are often the first port of call for students facing difficulties, who can talk to many different people, including their own tutor; the senior member of college who is responsible for welfare; the college nurse; the student welfare officer; or fellow students who have gone through peer-support training.”last_img read more

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Moira Buffini’s Dying For It Begins Performances Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments In addition to Slotnick, the cast of Dying For It includes Mia Barron, Ben Beckley, Nathan Dame, Patch Darragh, Clea Lewis, Peter Maloney Andrew Mayer, Mary Beth Peil, Jeanine Serralles, Robert Stanton and C.J. Wilson. The American premiere of Moira Buffini’s Dying For It begins off-Broadway performances on December 11. The play, adapted from Nikolai Erdman’s The Suicide, will open officially at the Atlantic Theater Company’s Linda Gross Theater on January 8, 2015 and run through January 18. Joey Slotnick stars in the Neil Pepe-helmed production. Related Shows Dying For It follows Semyon (Slotnick), a man down on his luck, married to a nag and out of options. When he decides to throw in the towel and kill himself, a deluge of sympathetic visitors descends upon him, determined to make him a martyr for their many causes. The play satirizes the hypocrisy and illogic of Soviet life and was banned by Stalin before ever hitting the stage. Dying For It Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 18, 2015last_img read more

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Council on Economic Advisors Combine Taxpayer Losses With Climate Risk in Making Case for U.S. Coal-Lease Reform

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Zahra Hirji for InsideClimate News:The White House Council on Economic Advisers presented a report this week that its chairman, Jason Furman, called “a real strong case for reform” to the federal coal leasing program.The review, the first time that President Obama’s top economic advisers have weighed in on one of the most hotly contested issues on the climate policy agenda, found that reforms would both reward taxpayers and protect the climate.Furman called the coal leasing system “antiquated” and said it falls far short of offering a fair return to taxpayers. Furman unveiled the report and a panel of four outside experts then discussed CEA’s findings at a seminar hosted by the research nonprofit Resources for the Future on Wednesday in Washington, D.C.The report contains a sophisticated economic analysis that showed how increasing what the government charges companies in royalties for the coal they take from federal land not only raises revenue but reduces carbon emissions.To maximize taxpayer returns from coal leasing, CEA estimates that future royalty rates for new coal leases would have to go up to about 300 percent, compared to the rate often used today (less than 12.5 percent). This move would rake in billions of dollars for state and federal governments and reduce coal production on federal land by about 50 percent. The resulting climate impact would be big: a reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from coal combustion of 319 million metric tons annually.CEA’s report comes six months after the U.S. Department of the Interior launched its first review of the coal leasing program in about 30 years. The review follows several lawsuits by environmental groups such as WildEarth Guardians. They have challenged the Interior Department for not adequately accounting for coal’s climate impacts as it reviews applications for new leases and expansions to existing ones, among other issues. Additionally, several studies have come out including a 2013 report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office raising questions about how federal officials estimate the fair market value of coal in the leasing operations.The CEA analysis took a sensible approach to handling climate change, offering an example for how to evaluate “good financing strategy of the coal industry” and simultaneously use “sound emissions policy,” said Tom Sanzillo, director of finance at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis.White House: Raising Coal Royalties a Boon for Taxpayers, and for the Climate Council on Economic Advisors Combine Taxpayer Losses With Climate Risk in Making Case for U.S. Coal-Lease Reformlast_img read more

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Jailer of Betancourt and Three Americans Extradited to U.S.

first_imgBy Dialogo July 16, 2009 Bogotá, 16 July (EFE).- Former FARC chief Gerardo Antonio Aguilar, alias “Caesar,” one of the jailers of former Colombian presidential candidate Ingrid Betancourt and three Americans, was extradited to the U.S. today with rigorous security measures in place. About fifty policemen escorted “Caesar” to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) airplane that was to take him to Washington to be tried by a District of Colombia court on drug-trafficking and money-laundering charges. “He has been turned over to the American authorities,” said the director of the Colombian Judicial Police (Dijin), Gen. Luis Ramírez, in reference to the former FARC guerrilla, who was protected the entire time by about fifty police personnel and a bullet-proof helmet and vest. “Caesar” was one of the jailers holding Betancourt and three Americans until they were rescued by the Colombian army on 2 July 2008 during Operation Jaque, in which a total of fifteen hostages held by the FARC were freed and “Caesar” was captured, along with another guerrilla chief. The Dijin turned the former rebel over to the DEA at the Catam military airport, in western Bogotá, after a rigorous medical examination in which it was determined that he has psoriasis, an illness of the skin. The extradition operation began at 4:30 a.m. local time (9:30 a.m. GMT) from La Picota jail, in southern Bogotá, from which the prisoner took with him a sweater, underwear, and a dermatological cream. “He is a quite nervous person and is worried about his future in the United States, and in fact, this should serve as a warning to the other terrorists in the FARC that their future is either in jail or put out of business by the forces of the state,” General Ramírez said. “Caesar’s” extradition on drug-trafficking charges was authorized by the Supreme Court of Justice (CSJ) on 19 February, but the court indicated that he could not be tried for the crime of hostage-taking, as the U.S. Justice Department argued in its extradition request. “Caesar” was captured on 2 July 2008 when an undercover operation by the Colombian army rescued fifteen hostages held by the FARC, among whom were Americans Thomas Howes, Keith Stansell, and Marc Gonsalves, kidnapped on 13 February 2003 in the jungles of southern Colombia. Stansell, Gonsalves, and Howes, the pilot, were working for a firm contracted by the U.S. Defense Department to collect information on drug plantations in Colombia, but the FARC accused them of spying for the American Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).last_img read more

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Gen X is more than a financial footnote between Boomers and Millennials

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Arnold Mark Arnold is an acclaimed speaker, brand expert and strategic planner helping businesses such as credit unions and banks achieve their goals with strategic marketing insights and energized training. Mark … Web: www.markarnold.com Details There was a terrific Saturday Night Live skit earlier this year that matched Baby Boomers against Millennials in a game show format. After slinging insults about debt relief, Social Security, healthcare and other hot topics, the host of the parody show (Kenan Thompson) remarks amongst the commentary that “I’m Gen X. I just sit on the sidelines and watch the world burn.”For far too long, Gen X has been relegated to a relatively small bump in the road between Boomers and Millennials. And we’re not just talking socially or politically. This same unfortunate phenomenon also occurs financially. Gen Xers have unique financial needs that cannot be colloquially described as “post-boomer” or “pre-millennial.” Gen X is its own unique generation with its own unique financial challenges, aspirations and needs — and your credit union must address that if Gen X is one of your target markets.So, what financial challenges face Gen Xers and how can financial institutions address them? Consider the following.Challenge: Gen X is underserved by the financial services industry. One wealth management executive noted “our industry was built by Boomers, for Boomers …” and “…  industry leaders seem fascinated by millennial investors … but the Gen X investors get no attention.”  Another commented “I don’t think they [Gen X] are behind in their planning but the industry has ignored them aside from trying to sell them whole life policies or annuities. Products aren’t a plan.” Solution: Although the quotes above focus more on investments, the same can be said of all financial products and services at Gen X. For a variety of reasons, Gen X is underserved by the financial services industry. Your credit union, if at all interested in serving the needs of the roughly 85 million Gen X consumers, must take a long, hard look at both its products and services and how it addresses this age group. Do you offer products and services that fit the needs of Gen X or are you simply trying to cram them into a convenient hybrid Boomer/Millennial pigeonhole? A marketing audit can help determine if your credit union is authentically reaching out to Gen X. Challenge: Gen X is swamped by debt. A Pew Survey from a few years ago noted an interesting statistic on Gen X; while 75% of Gen Xers have higher family incomes that their parents did, only about a third have higher wealth. Why is this? The answer is simple (and frightening) – most Gen Xers have six times the debt their parents did. Additional debt-related information on Gen X is equally concerning. They tend to be under-saved for retirement and express substantial concerns about ever meeting their financial goals.Solution: It comes down to just how much your credit union wants to invest in reaching Gen X. The sheer size of this generation indicates reaching out to them would benefit financial institutions. Most credit unions, in their quest to grow younger, would also do well to tap into financial products and services for the children of Gen Xers. More specifically, does your credit union offer financial education regarding debt to Gen Xers? From a marketing perspective, this cannot simply be a rehashed version of what you may already offer to Millennials. Savvy Gen Xers will sniff out this generational slight in a heartbeat. Your financial education materials (and just as importantly, the education/training you give to employees on how to relate to Gen X) must have context, language, graphics and pictures that are both relatable and relevant to Gen X consumers.Challenge: Gen X is sandwiched in a way faced by no other American generation. Referred to one recent article as “a generation of jugglers,” Gen X (born between 1965 and 1980) finds itself jammed directly between Baby Moomers at Millennials. Both are larger generations numerically speaking and neither are ashamed to toss that weight advantage around. Gen X finds itself sandwiched between their aging parents (Boomers) and the younger generation of Millennials. This means a great many Gen Xers are actively taking care of (or planning to take care of) their retiring parents while still raising their own children (some of which are taking longer to launch into financial adulthood that perhaps anticipated).Solution: Your credit union must better understand the unique situation Gen Xers face and combine those needs with not only products and services but a more evolved and educated mindset about Gen X. Leadership and generational training are great ways to help bridge this gap. Your approach to Gen X must be informed and compassionate. Understanding this generation faces challenges and pressures no other American generation has ever addressed will go a long way towards helping attract them to your financial institution and earn their loyalty and respect.Serving Boomers is terrific. Serving Millennials is great. Even preparing to more actively serve Generation Z is both wise and prescient. However, credit unions that continue to underserved the financial products and services needs of Generation X are simultaneously poking a hole in their own growth bucket and falling short of the time-tested and still-relevant credit union philosophy of people helping people. Gen X, while not perfect, certainly deserves closer scrutiny and service from credit unions. The return on investment in both market/wallet share and values-based philosophy justifies it.last_img read more

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Mapping a way to insights

first_img continue reading » The best way to understand a process isn’t by going to the experts who designed it. Rather, it’s by asking the people who use it.PenFed Credit Union in Tysons, Va., recently completed a journey map of what members experience when opening a new checking account.“We wanted a holistic view of what the potential member was going to experience when looking for a new checking account,” says Lauren Kessler, digital strategist at the $25.1 billion asset credit union. “The journey map maps everything from what the customer or potential member’s actions are from the time they have the trigger or need all the way through to converting and obtaining a new checking account.”PenFed contracted HCL Technologies to conduct the in-depth interviews and gather information about the process  to create the journey map, Kessler says. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Feds Fine NY $150K for Environmental Violations at Long Island State Parks

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York New York State was fined $150,000 for a decade-long delay in closing three dozen large-capacity cesspools that violate federal environmental law at seven New York State parks on Long Island, officials said.The state is also required to spend $8.8 million to replace them and another 18 prohibited cesspools at upstate parks, plus spend more than $1 million on projects designed to mitigate water pollution in order to settle a lawsuit in which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency alleged that New York violated Safe Drinking Water Act deadlines to correct the problem, prosecutors announced Wednesday.“Public parks and water pollution don’t go together,” said Judith Enck, the EPA regional administrator. “After years of being out of compliance with federal law, New York State will finally close the numerous cesspools found in state parks, helping protect groundwater from nitrogen and other pollutants.”The EPA alleged that the state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the Palisades Interstate Park Commission failed to close a total of 54 antiquated oversized cesspools by the federal deadline of April 5, 2005. Such cesspools leach raw sewage, causing nitrogen pollution that can compromise the aquifers that serve as drinking water reserves for most of LI’s 3 million residents and produce brown tides that kill marine life in local bays.Six of the prohibited cesspools are in the process of being replaced. Plans have been submitted to close the other 29, officials said. Most on LI will be closed by next September with the remainder slated for closure by September 2018, officials added. The parks will either divert urine to sewage treatment facilities or install nitrogen-reducing technology.The parks on LI that are in violation include Robert Moses State Park in Babylon, Sunken Meadow State Park in Kings Park, Wildwood State Park in Wading River, Caumsett State Historic Park in Lloyd Harbor, Connetquot River State Park Preserve in North Great River, Captree State Park in Babylon and Hallock State Park in Wading River.The settlement agreement is subject to a 30-day public comment period before the EPA and prosecutors for the Eastern District of New York will decide whether to ask a federal judge to finalize the settlement.last_img read more

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Reba McEntire Turned Down ‘The Voice’ Before Blake Shelton Joined

first_img– Advertisement – The Voice was not the first job that McEntire turned down. She revealed in a February 2019 episode of Watch What Happens Live that she had been offered the role of Margaret “Molly” Brown in Titanic but could not do it because of a scheduling conflict. The part in the 1997 film ultimately went to Kathy Bates.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! Shelton, 44, is the only coach who has appeared on every season of The Voice, while other stars including his fiancée, Gwen Stefani, Christina Aguilera, Usher and Pharrell Williams have sporadically coached the series over the years. The current lineup consists of the “God’s Country” crooner, Stefani, 51, Kelly Clarkson and John Legend.Reba McEntire Confirms She Turned Down Offer to Coach The Voice Before Blake Shelton Signed OnAndy Cohen and Reba McEntire on ‘Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen.’ YouTubeShelton first revealed that producers originally had McEntire in mind for his spot while chatting with reporters at his Ole Red bar in Nashville in November 2019.“If I’m not mistaken, they wanted Reba to be a coach on The Voice first. They knew they wanted a country artist to be a coach on The Voice to fill that lane,” he said at the time, per Taste of Country. “For whatever reason, she couldn’t do it, or they just decided it wasn’t the thing for her at the time.”- Advertisement – The three-time Grammy winner confirmed that she was offered the spinning red chair that ultimately went to Blake Shelton ahead of the NBC singing competition’s 2011 premiere.“Blake was the perfect choice,” she said. “He’s done a wonderful job.”When Andy Cohen asked McEntire whether she regrets passing on the show now that it is a huge success in its 19th season, she responded with a laugh, “Oh, sure! I mean, after you see a very successful show that’s been running, what, 15 years? Uh, yeah! I’m like, ‘Shoot, I should’ve done that.’”- Advertisement – Reba McEntire has done just about everything in the four-plus-decades since she launched her career. She’s released 33 albums, acted on the big screen and Broadway, had her own sitcom and won countless awards. But when an opportunity arose to coach The Voice, the country superstar turned it down.“It is very true,” McEntire, 65, said on Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen on Tuesday, November 10, ahead of her cohosting gig at the 2020 CMA Awards. “It was a very popular show in Holland, I’m pretty sure, and I watched the tape, and I said, ‘No, I’m going to pass on that’ because I don’t think I could ever be able to tell somebody that they’re terrible or go find another job or hope you like your nighttime job. I couldn’t do that day in and day out. I just couldn’t do it, so I did pass on it.”Reba McEntire Confirms She Turned Down Offer to Coach The Voice Before Blake Shelton Signed OnReba McEntire and Blake Shelton. Matt Baron/Shutterstock; Trae Patton/NBC- Advertisement –last_img read more

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