The 1,000-robot swarm

first_imgThe first 1,000-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University.“Form a sea-star shape,” directs a computer scientist, sending the command to 1,024 little ’bots simultaneously via an infrared light. The robots begin to blink at one another, and then gradually arrange themselves into a five-pointed star. “Now form the letter K.”The “K” stands for Kilobots, the name given to these extremely simple robots, each just a few centimeters across, standing on three pinlike legs. Instead of one highly complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors.Just as trillions of individual cells can assemble into an intelligent organism, or 1,000 starlings can form a great flowing murmuration across the sky, the Kilobots demonstrate how complexity can arise from very simple behaviors performed en masse. To computer scientists, they also represent a significant milestone in the development of collective artificial intelligence (AI).The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Credit: Harvard SEASThis self-organizing swarm was created in the lab of Radhika Nagpal, the Fred Kavli Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. The advance is described in the August 15 issue of Science.“The beauty of biological systems is that they are elegantly simple — and yet, in large numbers, accomplish the seemingly impossible,” says Nagpal. “At some level, you no longer even see the individuals; you just see the collective as an entity to itself.”“Biological collectives involve enormous numbers of cooperating entities — whether you think of cells or insects or animals — that together accomplish a single task that is a magnitude beyond the scale of any individual,” said lead author Michael Rubenstein, a research associate at Harvard SEAS and the Wyss Institute.He cited, for example, the behavior of a colony of army ants. By linking together, they can form rafts and bridges to cross difficult terrain. Social amoebas do something similar at a microscopic scale: When food is scarce, they unite to create a fruiting body capable of escaping the local environment. In cuttlefish, color changes at the level of individual cells can help the entire organism blend into its surroundings. (As Nagpal points out with a smile, an entire school of fish in the movie “Finding Nemo” also collaborate when they form the shape of an arrow to point the title character toward the East Australian Current.)“We are especially inspired by systems where individuals can self-assemble together to solve problems,” said Nagpal. Her research group made news in February with a group of termite-inspired robots that can collaboratively perform construction tasks using simple forms of coordination.But the algorithm that instructs those TERMES robots has not yet been demonstrated in a very large swarm. In fact, only a few robot swarms to date have exceeded 100 individuals, because of the algorithmic limitations on coordinating such large numbers, and the cost and labor involved in fabricating the physical devices.The research team overcame both of these challenges through thoughtful design.Most notably, the Kilobots require no micromanagement or intervention once an initial set of instructions has been delivered. Four robots mark the origin of a coordinate system. All the other robots receive a 2-D image to mimic, and then, using very primitive behaviors — following the edge of a group, tracking a distance from the origin, and maintaining a sense of relative location — they take turns moving toward an appropriate position. With co-author Alejandro Cornejo, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard SEAS and the Wyss Institute, the researchers demonstrated a mathematical proof that the individual behaviors would lead to the right global result.Programmable self-assembly in a thousand-robot swarm <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xK54Bu9HFRw” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/xK54Bu9HFRw/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Courtesy of SEASThe Kilobots also correct their own mistakes. If a traffic jam forms or a robot moves off-course — errors that become much more common in a large group — nearby robots sense the problem and cooperate to fix it.To keep the cost of the Kilobot down, each robot moves using two vibrating motors that allow it to slide across a surface on its rigid legs. An infrared transmitter and receiver allow it to communicate with a few of its neighbors and measure their proximity. But the robots are myopic and have no access to a bird’s-eye view. These design decisions come with tradeoffs, Rubenstein explained.“These robots are much simpler than many conventional robots, and as a result, their abilities are more variable and less reliable,” he said. “For example, the Kilobots have trouble moving in a straight line, and the accuracy of distance sensing can vary from robot to robot.”Yet, at scale, the smart algorithm overcomes these individual limitations and guarantees, both physically and mathematically, that the robots can complete a human-specified task, in this case assembling into a particular shape. That’s an important demonstration for the future of distributed robotics, says Nagpal.“Increasingly, we’re going to see large numbers of robots working together, whether it’s hundreds of robots cooperating to achieve environmental cleanup or a quick disaster response, or millions of self-driving cars on our highways,” she said. “Understanding how to design ‘good’ systems at that scale will be critical.”For now, the Kilobots provide an essential test bed for AI algorithms.“We can simulate the behavior of large swarms of robots, but a simulation can only go so far,” said Nagpal. “The real-world dynamics — the physical interactions and variability — make a difference, and having the Kilobots to test the algorithm on real robots has helped us better understand how to recognize and prevent the failures that occur at these large scales.”The Kilobot robot design and software, originally created in Nagpal’s group at Harvard, are available open-source for non-commercial use. The Kilobots have also been licensed by Harvard’s Office of Technology Development to K-Team, a manufacturer of small mobile robots.This research was supported in part by the Wyss Institute and by the National Science Foundation.last_img read more

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Getting comfortable outside their comfort zones

first_img Support for a diverse student body Related This is the first installment in Learning from Difference, a five-part series on diversity at Harvard.There is no education without diverse points of view, said Danoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana, sitting in his office the morning after Harvard’s 367th Commencement sent 7,000 graduates into a world of differences.A good education piles up the unknowns, Khurana said. It allows students to reconsider assumptions in multiple aspects of their lives — intellectual, social, personal — by presenting them with new facts and new experiences, and by surrounding them with diverse groups of classmates and viewpoints, both formally and informally.In the end, that exposure not only instills knowledge and a more accurate view of the world, it gives students a lens through which to re-examine themselves, their upbringings, and their beliefs. Issues of race, inclusion prompt fresh discussions; police probe Law School defacement; report outlines diversity concerns Faculty approves report on import of community interaction “The only way to advance a field, to advance research … is through a diversity of perspectives. … This is not a new, original insight, but one that we need to remind ourselves of over and over again,” said Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard file photoThe report of the Khurana-chaired Committee to Study the Importance of Student Body Diversity, which was adopted by the faculty in 2016, noted the critical role diversity plays in a liberal arts education, one “in which challenge and confrontation are essential counterparts to collaboration and cooperation.”Recognition of the value of a diverse student body dates back to the College’s founding days, the report said, when Harvard’s charter, granted by Gov. Thomas Dudley in 1650, dedicated the institution to “the education of the English and Indian youth of this country.”The pursuit of student diversity continued over the centuries, albeit imperfectly and in the context of changing times. In the mid-1800s, as the nation veered toward civil war, then-Harvard President C.C. Felton argued for nationalizing what had been a regional college, because admitting students from “different and distant states must tend powerfully to remove prejudices by bringing them into friendly relations.”In the mid-1900s, with the admission of more public school students leading to a more socially and economically diverse student body, the House system was conceived as a way to keep students from self-sorting, by having them share living space. In 1997, after it became clear that individual Houses had become places more welcoming to students of specific backgrounds, assignments were randomized. “Diversity in the student body is important for the same reason that it’s important in research,” Khurana said. “The only way to advance a field, to advance research … is through a diversity of perspectives. It is a necessary condition for knowledge to advance. This is not a new, original insight, but one that we need to remind ourselves of over and over again.”Harvard College’s whole-person approach to creating a diverse student body is currently being challenged in federal district court, the latest in a series of lawsuits that have targeted universities’ right to consider race as one factor among many when choosing among academically qualified applicants. The last serious test came in June 2016, in Fisher v. University of Texas, when the Supreme Court upheld a university’s right to consider an applicant’s race in admissions.The most recent case has been brought against Harvard by a group created by conservative activist Edward Blum, who has sought through prior legal challenges to eliminate race-conscious admissions. The case argues that Asian-American students, who make up 22.7 percent of Harvard’s incoming freshman class and 6 percent of the U.S. population, are underrepresented on campus. Related A national wave hits Harvard The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. “A fair reading of Harvard’s history reveals a process across time in which the College has developed a recognition and appreciation of the excellence that comes only from including and embracing multiple sources of talent,” the committee wrote.The report highlights different ways student-body diversity — whether racial, ethnic, socio-economic, national, or experiential — is an important part of the Harvard experience. One place different perspectives find expression is the classroom, where students can spark discussion on topics a more homogenous class might not think controversial, or even noteworthy, the report said. The General Education Curriculum, meanwhile, is designed to introduce students to diverse disciplines and ideas.Outside the classroom, residential and extracurricular experiences — including athletic teams, public service organizations, and clubs — expose students to new ideas and experiences. Students regularly cite classmates as an important source of learning, whether through late-night conversations or meet-ups at the dining hall.“Each of us brings a unique perspective based on our personal and sociological biography,” Khurana said. “These perspectives can offer deep insights and allow us to test our understandings against an intellectual framework or established understandings. Our personal experiences can also limit what we see and understand, which is why comparative perspectives are so critical. These comparative perspectives — historical, cross-cultural, a different framing of a problem — create new understandings and new possibilities.”While racial and ethnic differences are key considerations in forming the student body, other factors are also important. Harvard’s 15-year-old financial aid program has helped fuel social and economic diversity. More than half of today’s students receive financial aid, and the average annual cost to parents of students receiving aid is $12,000. One in five undergraduates comes from a family that earns less than $65,000 per year, meaning they pay nothing toward the cost of education.International education is another key facet of student diversity, fostered both by admitting students from all over the world and more than 250 study-abroad programs.The incoming freshman class is one of the most diverse in Harvard’s history. To date, it is 15.5 percent African-American, 22.7 percent Asian-American, 12.2 percent Latino, 2 percent Native American, and 0.4 percent native Hawaiian. It is also majority female, at 50.1 percent. International students, who make up 12 percent of the class, hail from 90 countries.“I don’t think we can say with any level of confidence that we are forming tomorrow’s global leaders if these students are not being shaped in a context that reflects global reality,” said Plummer Professor of Christian Morals Jonathan L. Walton. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard file photoWhile Harvard has continued to work on diversity since the report came out, committee member Jonathan Walton said that it’s misguided to seek an end to the work — to see diversity as a goal to be achieved.“Diversity is a reality to be lived and experienced,” said Walton, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church. “We never say that we’re there. Diversity is like Veritas: it’s an ideal of which we are in constant pursuit.”Training students in a diverse environment is crucial to preparing them for the world that awaits them, Walton said. Future leaders in education, business, and government have to be able to understand and engage with people different from themselves.“I don’t think we can say with any level of confidence that we are forming tomorrow’s global leaders if these students are not being shaped in a context that reflects global reality,” Walton said.“One might say that we have to be mindful that we are not educating a generation of aristocratic elites that are given to neo-fascism because they’ve been able to use power and pedigree to mask their ignorance,” Walton said. “And we know ignorance leads to fear and intolerance, which always leads to hate and suffering. What’s our moral responsibility to society at large?”“What a disservice we do, frankly, to the world, if we fail in attracting excellence from all quarters, and even more if we fail to foster that excellence once we’ve identified it and have it on campus,” said Emma Dench. Rose Lincoln/Harvard file photoEmma Dench, dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and another committee member, said that a commitment to campus diversity shows that Harvard takes seriously its mission to educate tomorrow’s global leaders.“What a disservice we do, frankly, to the world, if we fail in attracting excellence from all quarters, and even more if we fail to foster that excellence once we’ve identified it and have it on campus,” Dench said.One doesn’t have to look very far to see attacks on diversity-focused ideals, she added.“This is an area that is quite endangered,” Dench said.This spring, President Drew Faust accepted the recommendations of the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging, empaneled in May 2016, and appointed former Morehouse College President John Silvanus Wilson as a senior adviser and strategist to the president to implement them.In her Commencement speech, Faust reflected on the importance of diversity and the idea that Harvard is likely the most diverse place most students have lived, or may ever live. The University, she said, seeks to attract talented individuals of the broadest range of backgrounds and interests, and then asks them to both learn from and teach one another.“This isn’t easy. It requires individuals to question long-held assumptions, to open their minds and their hearts to ideas and arguments that may seem not just unfamiliar, but even disturbing and disorienting,” she said. “It … becomes ever more difficult in an increasingly polarized social and political environment in which expressions of hatred, bigotry, and divisiveness seem not just permitted but encouraged. But in spite of these challenges all around us, we at Harvard strive to be enriched, not divided, by our differences.”last_img read more

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Diabetes prevention

first_imgBy Connie CrawleyUniversity of GeorgiaIf you had gestational diabetes during pregnancy, you and your child have a greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy. It’s a sign that you might not use insulin as well as other women. Insulin helps your cells get energy from the blood sugar made when you digest food. If your insulin does not work well or you don’t have enough of it, your blood sugar will increase and you might get Type 2 diabetes. Children of women with gestational diabetes are more likely to have a problem with insulin, too. However, lifestyle changes can reduce the risk to you and your child. Research has shown that if a person can control his or her weight and be active, the chance of getting Type 2 diabetes is reduced by 60 percent. So what can you do?First, get checked for diabetes after your baby is born and again every one to two years. Finding Type 2 diabetes early and controlling it will help prevent or delay diabetic complications like vaginal or urinary tract infections, loss of sight, foot or leg infections that can lead to amputation, heart disease or kidney failure. Be sure to tell all your healthcare providers that you had gestational diabetes. They will keep an eye on your blood glucose values. Tell your child’s doctor, too, that you had gestational diabetes. Also, tell your child about his or her risk for diabetes. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 30 million Americans. It is a major problem in Georgia. To reduce risks for you and your child, do the following: •Breastfeed your baby. •Return to your pre-pregnancy weight. If you still weigh too much, work to lose 5 percent to 7 percent more. It’s best to lose 1 to 2 pounds per week. You are more likely to gain weight back if you lose it too quickly.•Make healthy food choices. Eat at least two vegetables at lunch and supper. Have fruit for desserts and snacks. Eat smaller amounts of lean meat, poultry and fish. Eat whole wheat breads. Avoid white bread and refined grains. Eat low-fat or non-fat dairy foods. Use only one to two teaspoons of oil or soft margarine at each meal instead of butter, salad dressings, mayonnaise or stick margarines.•Eat smaller portions. A portion as wide and as thick as your palm is about a half of a cup or four ounces of vegetables, starches or protein foods. A tight fist is the right size for pieces of fruit and baked potatoes. •Drink water instead of sweetened drinks. •Be active for at least 30 minutes five or more days a week. •Ask your doctor or a dietitian for a proper eating plan for your child. Help your whole family make healthy choices. Advocate for healthy foods to be served at your child’s school. •Limit TV, video and computer game time to an hour or two a day.•Encourage your child to be active every day for at least an hour.(Connie Crawley is a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension nutritionist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences.)last_img read more

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EU Will Donate $1.6 Billion For Haitian Reconstruction

first_imgBy Dialogo March 31, 2010 The European Union (EU) announced a donation of 1.2 billion euros (1.6 billion dollars) at the international conference on Haitian reconstruction being held in New York, organized after January’s devastating earthquake. This amount, which will be delivered over the next three years, corresponds to the total contributions of the European Commission (the executive organ of the twenty-seven members), the European Investment Bank (EIB), and the individual member states, a spokeswoman for the chief European diplomat, Catherine Ashton, explained. More than a hundred countries, along with international bodies, are meeting at the UN’s New York headquarters in a donor conference for Haiti, where the 12 January earthquake took at least 220,000 lives and left 1.3 million survivors in need of aid. The goal of the meeting is to collect around 3.8 billion dollars immediately, out of a total of 11.5 billions of dollars of aid that is estimated to be needed to rebuild the small country in ten years.last_img read more

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FAMU law names its ‘founding faculty’

first_imgFAMU law names its ‘founding faculty’ Florida A&M University College of Law has announced its “founding faculty” as it continues to prepare for its inaugural class, which is scheduled to begin in August at its Orlando home.“The founding faculty members are individuals of distinction in teaching, scholarship, and professional service,” Dean Percy R. Luney, Jr., said. “They are experienced, nationally recognized, and highly regarded in legal education.”Dean Luney said strong law schools have strong faculties.“I believe our search efforts have secured a very strong faculty to not only begin this inaugural year, but to uphold our university commitment and continued tradition of excellence with caring, in the years and decades to come,” he saidThe new FAMU law school faculty include: • Joan R. Bullock joins the FAMU College of Law from the University of Toledo College of Law. Professor Bullock has practiced in the areas of corporate tax, mergers and acquisitions, and valuation services. She has taught contracts, accounting for lawyers, agency, partnerships, corporations, commercial paper, law practice, and secured transactions. Professor Bullock has published in the areas of administrative law, family law, and commercial paper. • Bill Henslee brings his experience in sports, entertainment, and travel law to FAMU. Henslee taught at the Pepperdine University School of Law and Santa Clara University School of Law and is co-author of a legal casebook on travel law. As a principal in the firm of Henslee and Weisberger, Henslee represented clients in the music and sports industries. His experience in sports and entertainment law includes establishing American Pride Publishing, a music publishing company controlling copyrights, and his work as a certified contract advisor with the National Football League Players Association and the Canadian Football League Players Association. • Frederick Dennis Greene joins FAMU from the University of Oregon School of Law. Greene has taught torts, contracts, intellectual property, entertainment law, business planning, and mass media, race, and law. He also has an extensive business background, specifically in the music and film industries. As a founding member of the musical group Sha Na Na, he performed on television, in films, and in concerts for 15 years. Greene has researched and published in the areas of entertainment law, sports law, intellectual property law, computer law, business law, and American law and race. • John Paul Jones brings extensive practice and alternative dispute resolution experience to FAMU. As a senior partner in employment law firms with a national practice, he appeared before five U.S. Courts of Appeal and the U.S. Supreme Court. For the last 12 years, he has specialized in alternative dispute resolution, founding and serving as president of The John Paul Jones Group, a full service ADR provider. He will be entering his 10th year as a faculty member of the National Judicial College in Reno, Nevada, where he has taught civil mediation and advanced communication. Professor Jones has regularly conducted training, nationally and in South Africa, in the areas of mediation, negotiation, mediation advocacy, and communication. He is a Florida certified circuit civil mediator, has extensive mediation experience in a wide variety of cases, and has served as a special master for ADR in toxic tort cases. He has served on Florida’s Mediator Qualifications Board since its creation. He has also researched and published in the areas of mediation and ADR. • Lundy R. Langston joins FAMU from Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center. Langston has taught torts, criminal law, international criminal law, family law, domestic violence, race and the law, cyber law, juvenile law, and women and the law. Langston has published numerous law review articles in the areas of family law, domestic violence, race and the law, and criminal law. She also has co-written a casebook on torts and conducted a mock U.S. law school course at the University of Beijing Law School. • Grace M. Mills brings her background in library science to FAMU as professor and director of the law library. Before joining FAMU, Mills served as a law librarian at City University of New York Law School, University of California at Berkeley, and North Carolina Central University School of Law. Professor Mills has taught legal research and legal bibliography, including print and electronic sources. She has published in the areas of legal research and legal reference. • Omar Saleem is the associate dean for Academic Affairs at FAMU College of Law. He joins the faculty from St. Thomas University School of Law. He has taught criminal law, criminal procedure, insurance law, legal research, environmental law, interviewing counseling and negotiation, juvenile law, international environmental law, race and the law, torts, remedies, and cyberlaw. He has published numerous articles on a variety of legal topics including environmental law, criminal procedure, international law, and China-related matters. May 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img FAMU law names its ‘founding faculty’ last_img read more

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3 sweet employee benefits you may be missing

first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr More than two-thirds of adult workers under 65 are covered by their job’s health plan, and about half of workers participate in their company’s retirement plan. As the labor market starts to heat up, more businesses are adding or enhancing other benefits, as well — but workers might not be cashing in on these perks.“While workplace benefits such as retirement and healthcare are core to employer offerings, great organizations offer a broad spectrum of benefits,” says Beth Raymond, senior vice president and chief HR officer at Principal Financial Group. You might need to take the initiative and ask, but it’s highly possible, especially if you work for a larger organization, that your company also has one or more of the following set up; if so, figure out whether you’ll be able to take advantage.Tuition Reimbursement/Professional Development“Many organizations do not publicize their tuition reimbursement programs well,” says Ravin Jesuthasan, global leader of talent management at HR consulting firm Towers Watson. “Managers may be reluctant to have employees take time away from work for development purposes.” You might need to take the initiative and ask HR what’s available, and then talk to your boss about how you’ll make up for any out-of-the-office time your classwork might require. continue reading »last_img read more

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Maintain your financial health with these smart money moves

first_imgJust as the uncertainty surrounding coronavirus has caused us to make adjustments to our normal day-to-day routine, it’s important to consider doing the same to protect your financial health and wellness. Now more than ever, maintaining and elevating your financial situation is essential to you and your family’s future.While establishing an emergency fund and/or lowering your debt to income ratio should be your top priority, there are a number of additional strategic money moves you should consider to make this difficult time a little more manageable on your accounts, investments, and peace of mind. After all, it’s only logical to prepare yourself as much as you can for whatever lies ahead.Keep Investing for Retirement As my colleague John reminded us in his recent article, it’s important to remain calm when it comes to your 401K and investments. Ask any financial advisor and they’ll likely remind you that investing is a long game. Therefore, you should avoid making any rash investing decisions right now – and that includes pulling back on your monthly 401k contributions. If you’re concerned about reduction to your paycheck, consider radically cutting back on unnecessary expenses and diverting those funds to an emergency fund.Save with a High-Yield Account Speaking of emergency funds. Opening a high-yield savings account is a great way to make your money work harder and save more. The account’s superior interest rates make this a perfect option for those looking to start or build their emergency fund. Just keep in mind that many high-yield accounts have limits on the number of transfers you can make in a month and may require a minimum amount.Additionally, a high-yield savings account is a great way to help you save up for something you can enjoy once life gets back to normal. While it could be something big like a family trip, it could also be as simple as a new mountain bike and gear. Frankly, having a goal and something to look forward to after all this could do wonders for your mental health.Review Your Insurance Policies Just like with any major life change, it’s important to talk with your insurance agent about your auto, renters/home, and secondary coverages. Depending on your situation, your insurance agent could help you save some much needed money or provide the additional protection you and your family need. Some notable things to discuss with your agent: your college student moving back home, working from home/driving less, and any recent changes to your income.Examine Your Health Insurance Plan Especially during a health crisis like this, it’s important to take some time to acquaint yourself with your health insurance plan. In doing so, you should consider how your existing plan may impact your finances if you or your family get sick or injured. For those with a high-deductible plan, you may want to consider setting aside some extra money or opening up an Health Saving Account to cover any out-of-pocket expenses.Apply for Life InsuranceWhile it may be difficult to think about, it’s important to consider the financial implication of passing away during this crisis. Chances are you’ll be fine. However, a life insurance policy can help easy the transition for your family in the event something does happen. And, if anything, consider this an opportunity to finally check this off your financial to-do list.The same goes for your will. If you don’t have one or haven’t recently updated it, now is the perfect time.Refinance Your Mortgage Loan For homeowners, one of the positives to come out of this situation is record-low mortgage rates. If you plan to stay in your home for the next few years, you may be able to substantially save on your monthly payments. Even if you’re only able to shave half a percentage point off your interest rate, it may be worth having a conversation with your lender.Take advantage of optimal financing optionsWith federal interest rates on student loans on pause, you have an opportunity to make some major headway on your other loans. Thinking in terms of the debt-snowball method, consider using that extra capital to pay off your smallest debt first. Then apply that money to your next smallest loan. Learn more about the debt-snowball method in this recent article from CUInsight.Get Relief From Your Bills To assist with relief efforts, many large national companies are working directly with customers who may be struggling financially. This includes many broadband and cell phone providers, as well as credit card companies like American Express and CapitalOne. While you shouldn’t do this unless absolutely necessary, this may be an option if you need to shift some money around to pay rent and/or a utility bill until your next paycheck comes.Work On YouFinally, consider taking advantage of your newfound free time to add some new skills and knowledge to your repertoire. From professional certifications to continuing education classes, you now have an opportunity to explore your interests, expand your horizons, and potentially even discover a new way to make money.When it comes to your financial health and wellness, it’s essential to make sure you and your wallet are prepared to handle circumstances beyond your control. Remember, the personal finance experts at your local credit union are a great resource to help you get started. 95SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jackson Bolstad Detailslast_img read more

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Unai Emery ‘confident’ of overturning 3-1 Europa League defeat to Rennes

first_imgAdvertisement Unai Emery ‘confident’ of overturning 3-1 Europa League defeat to Rennes Comment Arsenal were humiliated against Rennes (Picture: Getty)Emery admits he was disappointed with his side’s reaction to going down to 10 men but insists they can progress to the quarter-finals.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘The red card changed the game more than we wanted. The first 40 minutes we controlled, we scored, we didn’t concede good chances,’ said Emery.‘But after this red card it’s more than we wanted. I think we can do better.‘The result for the first 90 minutes is hard for us but we are going to start the next match next week with 11 vs 11 and with the same respect we have had the first half. We are going to do that at home.‘I have confidence with our players, our supporters helping us.’More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errorsArsenal face Manchester United at the Emirates on Sunday before hosting Rennes in the reverse leg in seven days’ time.Sokratis’ red card means he misses the second leg, while Alexandre Lacazette remains suspended.MORE: Martin Keown slams Unai Emery for three decisions during Arsenal’s shock defeat to Rennes Unai Emery’s side have it all to do in the second leg (Picture: Getty)Arsenal boss Unai Emery was unhappy with his side’s collapse after Sokratis’ red card in a 3-1 defeat to Rennes but insists he’s still ‘confident’ of progressing to the next round.The Gunners took an early lead through Alex Iwobi but Sokratis provided the hosts with a route back into the match when he was sent off after half an hour for two bookable offences.Rennes equalised shortly before half-time and Nacho Monreal’s own goal put the French side ahead on the night and in the tie.However, Ismaïla Sarr’s late goal gave Rennes the two-goal cushion their performance deserved and means Arsenal must win by two clear goals next Thursday to overturn the deficit.ADVERTISEMENT Metro Sport ReporterThursday 7 Mar 2019 8:59 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link287Shares Advertisementlast_img read more

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Gov. Wolf Signs Two Bills into Law, Vetoes Flawed Telemedicine Bill, Releases Cross-Agency Guidance for Telehealth

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter April 29, 2020 Gov. Wolf Signs Two Bills into Law, Vetoes Flawed Telemedicine Bill, Releases Cross-Agency Guidance for Telehealthcenter_img Bill Signing,  Press Release,  Public Health Governor Tom Wolf today signed into law two bills: House Bill 1869 allows for National Guard members called to active duty to be covered under the Heart and Lung Act if they contract COVID-19 while performing their duties, and House Bill 752 provides for the Game Commission to pay a fair market value for land in Allegheny County.Gov. Wolf also vetoed Senate Bill 857, a telemedicine bill that passed the Senate unanimously last year before being amended to an untenable version in the House.“I supported a prior printer’s number of the bill, but as amended in the House of Representatives, this legislation arbitrarily restricts the use of telemedicine for certain doctor-patient interactions,” Gov. Wolf said. “As amended, this bill interferes with women’s health care and the crucial decision-making between patients and their physicians.”The full veto memo can be found as a PDF here or on Scribd.In addition to the telemedicine bill veto, the governor released cross-agency guidance on telehealth, citing its importance as a health care delivery option during COVID-19 and as providing it pertains to his authority under the Disaster Declaration signed in early March.Given the potential for widespread transmission of COVID-19 across Pennsylvania and to limit its spread, many health care providers and patients are expanding use of telehealth rather than in-person health care services.Today, the governor announced cross-agency guidance on steps taken to ensure that patients in need of vital health care services are receiving them in a timely, appropriate manner. Multiple state agencies are involved in providing expanded telehealth services, including the departments of State, Health, Drug and Alcohol Programs, Human Services and the Insurance Department.The guidance, available as a PDF here or on Scribd, includes:Expanded Role of ProvidersExpanding Reimbursement for Telehealth ServicesTelehealth for Infant Toddler Early Intervention ProceduresTelehealth for Behavioral HealthTelehealth for Substance Use Disorder TreatmentView this information in Spanish.last_img read more

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DNB warns of ‘impure decision-making’ due to conflicts of interest

first_imgMost pension funds’ boards pay insufficient attention to potential conflicts of interest of policy makers, pensions regulator De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB) has suggested.It indicated it was not satisfied with the outcome of a sector-wide survey, during which it checked whether schemes had conducted a risk analysis or had formulated a policy on conflicts of interest.DNB concluded that a large number of pension funds had not conducted an analysis, and had at best a policy that was not based on such a risk assessment.Additionally, it found that many schemes did not declare and register the main functions and jobs on the site of board members and other decision makers, and did not have a view on their private interests either. However, almost all pension funds had rules in place for how to deal with gifts, according to DNB.In its opinion, merely a handful of pension funds fully managed the risks posed by conflicts of interest.The watchdog commented that conflicts of interest could lead to “impure decision-making, which could harm pension funds”. Therefore, trustees must actively fight conflicts of interest, it said.DNB added that, during discussions with trustees, it had noted that the subject is charged, and that the sector needed clear examples as to what constituted a conflict of interest.As a consequence, the supervisor announced that it would draw up a number of good practices.last_img read more

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