the future

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. the futureOn 30 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article A great deal has been made of the decline of final salary pension schemes. But while this has been galling to some, it at least makes economic sense from an employer’s perspective. The schemes typically account for around 15 per cent of a pensions payroll, hike up administration costs and have uncertain contribution rates. Alternatives like money purchase schemes cost employers half the money and create half the headaches. And final salary schemes reward long service with one employer – something of a rarity these days.The problem lies with the shift in emphasis that this signals. The TUC expressed concern that responsibility for pensions is being transferred from the State and employers to individual workers and far fewer people will set up adequate pensions as a result.A study by KPMG Pensions research backs this up. It found that the rejection of final salary schemes could cut pensions by up to a third and leave people financially short when they retire. Currently, they believe that 43 per cent of companies running defined contribution pension schemes are contributing 5 per cent or less. In a typical final salary scheme, companies average contributions of up to 10 per cent.Confusing alternatives also cloud the issue. At launch, stakeholder pensions were supposed to provide a retirement safety net for the low paid. However, it is the well-off who have rushed to take up a stakeholder policy because it enables them to safely invest a percentage of their money.A study by Marks & Spencer, which surveyed 1,598 adults aged 18 to 65, found that only half of the population know what a stakeholder pension is. And 41 per cent have not taken out a pension because they cannot afford to – exactly the situation that stakeholders pensions were introduced to avoid.The same principle can be applied to almost any aspect of pensions. Thousands of people with private pensions were recently urged to switch back to State Earnings Related Pension Scheme (Serps) by Legal & General, Prudential, Standard Life and Equitable Life – the big insurers saying that private pensions will not provide comparable funds to the state scheme.Prior to this, the Government announced proposals to give fixed-term workers the same right to company pensions as permanent staff – something the CBI and the Employers Forum on Statute and Practice (EFSP) say is unworkable. The CBI estimates it will lead to £13m in unnecessary administration costs and £98m in extra pensions contributions when it is implemented in July.Increased regulations, bureaucracy and legal obligation (FRS17) and increased life expectancy have also combined to increase the cost of pensions.Firms like ICI, BT, Iceland and Ernst & Young have looked to the demographic costs of the future and realised that their final salary pensions schemes have to be closed to new, and in some cases, existing members.The result is a pensions situation that, while not necessarily in chaos, is certainly confusing and edging ever further from the stability of previous years.The UK pension system is in peril. For more than 20 years the State has been retreating from the provision of an adequate retirement income for all citizens. In the past, employers recognised they had a responsibility to help workers save for retirement, however, this social contract is now under threat with the State’s retreat from pension provision being matched by the employers’ headlong rush away from good, defined benefit pensions.The fundamental principal on which the TUC’s pension policy rests is that all workers must have a secure income in retirement that enables them to maintain a standard of living similar to that which they enjoyed in their final years of employment.The state pension is the foundation stone of the system and this needs to be built on by employers and individuals saving through decent occupational pensions schemes. Employers should be able to make membership of occupational pensions a condition of employment, and employers should also be compelled to contribute to an employee’s pension. The simplification of pension legislation should also go some way to improving the current complexity of pension provision.The challenge for the future is to ensure those workers without access to occupational pensions are, in the future, given access to a quality pension. Stakeholder pensions were intended to achieve this objective, but without significant employer contribution the full potential of stakeholder is unlikely to be fulfilled. The really big issue is not the nature of provision, but the amount of employer contribution. Low contributions to money purchase schemes are the major failing of those schemes at the moment.If this trend is not directly addressed before the balance between DB and DC shifts much further, we will condemn future generations of retired employees to a life on means-tested benefits rather than high-quality occupational pensions.It has been easy to feel rather smug about UK pensions. They have long looked in rude health compared to many of Europe’s state-sponsored, pay-as-you-go schemes. The linchpin of UK pensions has been the funded, defined benefit company pension scheme. But with timing that could not be more damaging, UK company pensions have been hit by a quadruple-whammy.Firstly, people are living longer, therefore drawing pensions for longer. Secondly, a low inflation, low interest rate economy is not conducive to enduring double-digit investment returns. Also, the global economic slowdown has forced many companies to focus on costs. Trimming, or at least holding down, the cost of employee benefits is tempting and relatively easy to do in a soft labour market.Lastly, we have a new accounting standard, FRS17, which highlights pension fund deficits in company accounts. Coming as it has, after the worst couple of investment years for a decade, many schemes are in deficit, leaving employers uncertain about carrying the financial risk of defined benefit pensions.The choice for employers of how to deal with pension provision is far from black and white. The idea of a wholesale switch to defined contribution pensions is oversold. We are likely to see more employers setting up schemes which share the risks and rewards more evenly between employer and employee, with average-earnings related pensions and other innovative pension plan designs.The Government has a role to play here. Employers are not required to set up pension schemes, but if they do, they face a quagmire of legislation, requiring them to provide benefits in specific forms and fund their schemes to a minimum level. The Government needs to listen to the recommendations which come out of the Pickering review. It also needs to allow greater flexibility for employers to provide the sort of pensions which best suit their business and their employees.What with the confusion over contracting-out, the demise of final salary schemes, and the miss-selling of Equitable, you could be forgiven for thinking the UK pension system is about to collapse. Of course, it is not that bad, but there are problems.The 1980s and 90s were great for pensions. Good demographics and high investment returns allowed a significant increase in provision. People are leaving the workforce at an earlier age, in spite of a significant increase in life expectancy.This is not sustainable in less benign times, and symptoms are emerging. There are many untidy patches to the state scheme. Lower real interest rates mean a higher cost to promise a given level of final salary pension, and companies are wary of the increased cost and risk.What needs to be done? Firstly, the Government needs to recognise the change and give clearer signals to help plan the future. It should simplify its own offering, looking to ensure the State provides for those who cannot, but making it clear the majority need to save more privately.The Pickering review, due in the summer, also provides an opportunity for the Government to start tidying up the confusion of initiatives, including simplifying state pensions. And there are signs of progress. Although stakeholder pensions are not reaching their original low-earner targets, they have created the ‘1 per cent world’ of ‘cheap and cheerful’ private pensions for the middle earner.The trend towards fewer final salary schemes is unstoppable – regulation (MFR, FRS17) may have been ham-fisted, but it has surfaced genuine underlying risks and cost increases which many companies find unacceptable.So be it – a decent money purchase scheme where the risks are clear may be better than final salary without adequate employer backing. And employees will be more interested – understanding of the importance of pensions is set to grow and grow.“It is a turbulent time for occupational pension schemes. Many companies are closing their final salary schemes and unions are partly blaming employers. It all seems a far cry from the election year of 1997, when many company schemes were comfortably in surplus and some were enjoying contribution holidays. But why are companies taking these decisions, and why now?Of course, the current economic environment is very different. Stock market growth has slowed, leading to valuations that reduce the predicted pension pot. And the population is ageing, which means pension schemes are funding ever-growing liabilities. Pensions are looking like a risky venture, and final salary pensions, where all risks are borne by employers, are looking like a cost that many businesses can ill-afford to bear.But what should we be doing? Few people would relish the idea of working into their 70s to secure a decent pension. The Government does not want to pick up the bill – it wants to expand the private sector pensions market from 40 per cent today to 60 per cent by 2050. But companies can’t go to the wall to fund their pension scheme. The Government should be encouraging the development of occupational pension schemes, but it is clear that, since 1997, things have got worse rather than better.In 1997, the Government took £3bn per year out of pension funds by removing dividend tax relief – a measure that could cost employees even more than a rise in income tax.Now there is FRS17, which forces companies to account for pension schemes on a snapshot basis, even though pension funds deliver returns over the long-term – creating enormous volatility in company accounts. For some companies which were already considering whether they could continue to afford final salary pensions, this measure has pushed them over the precipice.So from a business perspective, what should the Government be doing to encourage pensions rather than discouraging them? Firstly, replacing the minimum funding requirement was welcome, but careful negotiation is needed in the EU if the gains made by its abolition are not to be reversed by the pensions directive; FRS17 should also be modified to allow smoothing of asset values. Most company pension schemes are heavily invested in volatile equities and a shortfall in one year could easily turn into a surplus the next.The Government also needs to throw its weight behind the pensions simplification review. It is time to think the unthinkable – regulators cannot protect all pension scheme members all the time from every conceivable eventuality. Finally, the Government should find ways to return the money taken from pension schemes by the removal of dividend tax relief.If the Government wishes to encourage the development of occupational pension provision, it must be less prescriptive in its attitude towards pension regulation.”UK company pension assets exceed 90 per cent of GDP, compared to just 5 per cent in France. At the same time, state pensions consume 3 per cent of UK GDP, compared to around 14 per cent in Italy. Judging by these figures, if there is a pensions crisis, it is not in the UK.Nevertheless, high-profile companies abandoning defined benefit (DB) pension schemes – where pension is defined in advance based on salary and service – in favour of defined contribution (DC) schemes – where contributions are defined but pension depends on investment returns and the cost of annuities – is creating an illusion that ‘DB is good, DC is bad’.Companies want to reduce the financial risk of DB and are tempted to use developments such as new accounting rules as a scapegoat for change. Experience shows that employer contributions to DC schemes will generally be lower than the amounts paid into DB, so not only is risk being transferred to employees, but companies are putting less money into their pension plans.The demographics also add to concerns, as people are living longer and retiring earlier. The fact most of us are so confused by tax incentives and pensions in general combines to leave few people saving enough for retirement.If HR professionals gave more attention to the proportion of employment earnings replaced by pension, a more balanced approach to risk and increased employee awareness of the importance of retirement, some savings might emerge. From government, one straightforward set of tax incentives to encourage retirement saving would also help, as would part DC funding of UK state pensions.Sadly, the Government is likely to put-off such radical action.Employees will probably be slow to recognise that their pension assets might be worth more than their home and continue to retire early. Companies look certain to continue to implement low contribution rate DC plans and may ultimately feel obliged to top-up company pensions with ex-gratia payments, or re-discover an element of DB.Every week the list of companies switching from final salary pension schemes to money purchase schemes grows longer. Many companies are blaming their sudden change of heart on the FRS17 accounting standard, but the truth is that fundamental problems for the future of funded pensions have been building-up over a period of years and will remain unless pension provision is completely overhauled.To put all of the blame on FRS17 is to shoot the messenger. It is not the accounting standard, which has created a deficit in company pension funds; primarily, it is the combination of increasing life expectancies and a fall in returns that have put such pressure on funds. FRS17 has highlighted these in a rather dramatic way, but has not created a problem that did not already exist. The important issue is not creating a scapegoat, but finding effective, long-term solutions to the pension crisis, which will ensure all future pensioners are provided for.The switch from DB to DC is made far more serious by the fact that many firms are using the opportunity to slash their overall contributions. Therefore, the first response to this would be to try to ensure companies put adequate sums into pension funds on behalf of their employees.The introduction of a compulsory minimum contribution for all employers would be one response to this problem. This could ensure that ‘good’ employers who contribute significantly into their employees’ pensions were not undercut by those who did not. This may also need to be complemented by allowing employers to require all employees to be members of the scheme as a condition of service.It is important to remember, however, that company provision is only part of the jigsaw. For many employees who do not have access to an occupational scheme, an employer contribution to a stakeholder pension could provide a kickstart to the Government’s goal of extending pension coverage among people on modest incomes. There is plenty of evidence the offer of an employer contribution can be a key determinant of whether employees take out a pension, and compulsory employer contributions could make a real difference to the take-up of stakeholder.A move from final salary to money purchase schemes is bad for some employees but good for others. But a reduction in overall rates of employer contributions is bad news for all employees. The Government must take an urgent look at strategies to increase employer contributions and look seriously at compulsion if a strategy of incentives fails to achieve that goal.At the moment, it seems everybody has a plan for pensions policy. We are hearing too many quick-fix ideas that could leave tomorrow’s pensioners out of pocket.I believe the structure of pensions now in place after our reforms, which will be completed with the introduction of Pension Credit, is fundamentally sound.For various good reasons, layers of regulations had been loaded onto the pension regime resulting in too much red tape. That is why we started a radical review of regulation with the aim of simplifying the system. Alistair Darling will receive the report in June and set out proposals on which the Government will consult.Employers are key to these plans and we hope they will join us to cut back on regulation that holds them back, which is expensive in time, money and resources. If employers show the commitment to their workforce by contributing in their future, there is a high probability that this commitment will be reciprocated. The results will be seen through improved morale and help with recruitment and retention.We must preserve the powerful partnership between the Government and individuals in which the state pension provides the main building blocks of income in retirement, and that individuals boost that income by contributing to private schemes or the State Second Pension.Our commitment to the basic state pension was underlined this month when it rose by another £3 a week for a single pensioner and £4.80 for a couple. It is in order to strengthen this partnership that we have introduced the stakeholder pension to encourage those on moderate and higher earnings to put more towards their retirement.The new Pension Credit will ensure people see a reward for their thrift by receiving a top-up to their pension. When it is introduced from October 2003 there will be a simple assessment of income in order to calculate individuals’ eligibility.I began by warning that so-called easy solutions often prove very costly, but it has been true for a long time now that most people probably ought to be saving a lot more than they actually do, especially now we are living longer.That’s one of the reasons why we are introducing pension forecasts, so that within five years most people will receive an annual statement that will tell them how much – or in too many cases – how little they will get in retirement.last_img read more

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Am I likely to get HR

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. My partner is currently working in Shanghai, China and I am almost certainto join him out there next year. I have a business degree and am currentlystudying for a MA CIPD course, due to be completed in January and I have workedin HR for three years. Can you give me any ideas as to where I would startlooking for preferably a HR role, or an administrator role in China. Icurrently do not have any knowledge of Mandarin. Peter Sell, joint managing director, DMS Consultancy Your partner should start making contacts with local organisations to findout about vacancies and their views on employing UK nationals with no knowledgeof Mandarin. Another avenue to explore is multi-nationals which have a businesspresence in Shanghai. These would be able to give you constructive advice on your options or youcould talk to the CIPD International department. If you want to think more laterally, you could work from a home base inShanghai providing services to businesses in the UK with the use of technology.John Baker, head of practice, Macmillan Davies Hodes I assume that you have checked on the relevant employment law for China andhave confirmed you will be allowed to work. China is a fast-growing economy andis viewed as critical for many western corporations in their development of theAsian market so there are many western companies setting up and expandingoperations in China. Directly approaching these companies will give you a clearer idea of thequalifications and language skills being sought for roles in China. This shouldhelp you ascertain how critical Mandarin is when pursuing opport-unities. Iwould stress though that learning the local language will make your time inChina far easier both professionally and socially. Quite often success is based not just on professional ability but on yourability to observe the cultural formalities expected in a business and socialenvironment. Susan Field, senior consultant, Chiumento Many western enterprises are now establishing joint ventures in China and thereis a demand for expatriates in certain key skill shortage areas. Unfortunately,your HR experience and qualification has little value given the very differentworking culture in China. Coupled with your inability to speak Mandarin, thismeans your employability in an HR role, or even an admin position, is limited. You need to consider improving your employability through some developmentactivity – learning Mandarin would be a top priority. It is also a good idea toapproach your partner’s employer to ask if they are likely to have any suitableroles or can assist with your search through network contacts. Once you arrivein Shanghai, actively network with the expatriate community to identify anypotential opportunities. Previous Article Next Article Am I likely to get HROn 21 May 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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EU NAVFOR Welcomes German Frigate FGS LUEBCK

first_img December 6, 2011 View post tag: Frigate EU NAVFOR Welcomes German Frigate FGS LUEBCK On 03 December, EU NAVFOR welcomed the German frigate FGS LUEBCK to EU NAVFOR Somalia Operation ATALANTA.Commanded by Commander Martin Ruchay, the ship and her 219 crew members will operate in the area of operations of the Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea for the next two months. Her tasking will be to conduct counter-piracy patrols in the region, to escort World Food Program (WFP) and African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) vessels, and to contribute to the monitoring of fishing activities off the coast of Somalia.The ship has been in service with the German Navy since 1990, displaces 3,700 tons and is equipped with two Sea-Lynx helicopters which extend the area of influence and can carry troops and logistic supples.EU NAVFOR conducts counter-piracy in the Indian Ocean and is responsible for the protection of World Food Program ships carrying humanitarian aid for the people of Somalia and the logistic support vessels of the African Union troops conducting Peace Support Operations in Somalia. Additionally, EU NAVFOR monitors fishing activity off the coast of Somalia.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , December 06, 2011; Image: eunavfor View post tag: FGS View post tag: News by topic View post tag: welcomes Share this article View post tag: EU View post tag: German View post tag: LUEBCK View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today EU NAVFOR Welcomes German Frigate FGS LUEBCK View post tag: NAVFORlast_img read more

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Clinical Assistant/Associate/Full Professor – General Urology (37510)

first_imgThe Department of Urology at the University of Florida College ofMedicine is seeking a BC/BE Urologist at theAssistant/Associate/Full Professor level for a full-time facultyposition.Background. The University of Florida (UF) Department ofUrology at UF Health Shands Hospital is a tertiary referral centerthat serves the population of north central Florida, southernGeorgia and surrounding communities. The candidate would join amature practice within the department, which has 9 additionalfull-time urologists who support general, endourology, oncology,female, pediatric and reconstructive urologic surgery. TheUniversity of Florida is ranked 7th in the top public schools inthe nation. UF College of Medicine is one of 16 colleges within theuniversity and these additional colleges as well as the UF CancerCenter provide an environment rich in cross departmentalcollaborations.Clinical . We are seeking a candidate with broad experiencein treatments as applied to general urologic conditions. We areprimarily seeking candidates whose clinical focus is coverage ofboth office and surgical treatment of general, and small urologiccases. The candidate would join a robust multidisciplinary team ofphysicians including fellowship-trained endourologists,reconstruction specialists, urologic oncologists, and pediatricurologists. Additionally, the candidate will have the opportunityto serve as a mentor and teacher for UF urology fellows, residentsand medical students from UF Health Shands Hospital at the UFCollege of Medicine. Additional resources including four daVincirobotics, UroNav MRI-US fusion prostate biopsy technology, urologiconcology nurse navigator as well as eight shared mid-levelproviders to support the candidate’s clinical practice.Research. For those candidates with a keen interest inpursuing research as part of their academic career, the UF Collegeof Medicine is a superb location to practice as it offers excellentintramural funding opportunities in addition to traditionalgovernment funding mechanisms. In 2018, NIH funding at the UFCollege of Medicine exceeded $100M. Protected time for research isavailable for qualified candidates who receive research funding.Mentorship from experienced faculty members will be provide forcandidates without prior independent research experience and/orfunding. Strong interest and participation in clinical trials isrequired and will be conducted in conjunction with the UF Clinicaland Translational Science Institute and UF Cancer Center.Applicants must be licensed in or eligible for licensure in theState of Florida, and be board certified or board eligible.In order to be considered, you must upload a current CV, letter ofinterest, and 3 letters of recommendation or a list of 3professional references.This position is open until filled. Review of applications willbegin immediately.Final candidate will be required to provide official transcript tothe hiring department upon hire. A transcript will not beconsidered “official” if a designation of “Issued to Student” isvisible. Degrees earned from an education institution outside ofthe United States are required to be evaluated by a professionalcredentialing service provider approved by National Association ofCredential Evaluation Services (NACES), which can be found athttp://www.naces.org/If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to workin the US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.This position was originally posted under requisition #507093.Previous applicants are still being considered and need notre-apply.#medicine=35The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

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Dawn adds new taste of Americas to cookie range

first_imgDawn Foods has launched a new range of American-style cookies into the UK market.Available either ready-baked (76g) or as frozen pucks (80g) that can be baked in around 15 minutes, the cookie range uses high-quality inclusions, such as Belgian chocolate and fruit, and has been created in a nut-free environment.Flavour varieties include triple Belgian chocolate chunk, Belgian chocolate chunk, Belgian white chocolate chunk, cranberry and Belgian white chocolate chunk and oatmeal and raisin.Jacqui Passmore, marketing manager at Dawn Foods, said: “Our new American-style cookie range are a real ’taste sensation’. With a crunchy bite and a melt-in-the-mouth moist centre, operators can offer their customers delicious, luxury cookies with minimal fuss.”With consumers willing to pay for indulgent, high-quality products with their coffee, operators and outlets should ensure their offering meets these standards. Whether you buy them ready-baked for your ’on the go’ customers or bake through and serve warm from the oven, consumers will appreciate this great tasting product as part of your offering.”last_img read more

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Courtney Barnett Rocks Grateful Dead Cover On ‘The Tonight Show’ [Watch]

first_imgRising rock star Courtney Barnett recently impressed us as the musical guest on Saturday Night Live’s finale, rocking out on a couple original tunes from her recently-released Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit album. However, jam scene fans who listened to the massive Day Of The Dead compilation tribute album to the Grateful Dead surely heard Barnett’s potent rendition of the Workingman’s Dead classic, “New Speedway Boogie.”The Top 15 Tracks From Massive Grateful Dead Tribute Album, ‘Day Of The Dead’Barnett took to the stage of The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon last night, where she brought the Grateful Dead cover into the live setting. Barnett absolutely rocks the tune, keeping the traditional blues feel but adapting it to her disenfranchised rock style. Watch Barnett’s “New Speedway Boogie,” below.last_img read more

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TAUKing McGee Adds Alric “A.C.” Carter & Charlie Dolan To Umphrey’s McGee After-Show

first_imgThis weekend, Umphrey’s McGee will take over the Beacon Theatre for a three-night run in New York City. After the show on Friday, January 19th TAUK‘s Matt Jalbert & Isaac Teel will once again team up with Joel Cummins & Ryan Stasik of Umphrey’s McGee to form TAUKing McGee at the Highline Ballroom. Typically, when TAUKing McGee plays a show, it consists of all four members of TAUK with a rotating cast of characters from Umphrey’s McGee. This time around, Cummins and Stasik will perform the entirety of the show, with fellow TAUK members Alric “AC” Carter and Charlie Dolan now added to the bill–completing the TAUKing McGee circle and turning it into a quintet, with Dolan on deck as a scheduled special guest.L4LM recently spoke with TAUK’s AC and Jalbert to get a handle on just exactly what this show means to them. Jalbert was effusive, explaining that “every single one of the TAUKing McGee shows has been crazy” and that “every time, the energy in the room is ridiculous.” The ax-man expressed that “we were really excited to see what a TAUKing Biscuits show could be like, so we’re hoping to keep the idea alive and do something down the road,” however, in the end “when Ryan and Joel offered to jump on board for this one, it felt like getting the band back together, so, needless to say, we’re pumped!”AC is also excited to add to the fun. “TAUK has been crazy busy working on new material in the studio lately so I planned on taking a break by going to the afterparty to support my music family anyway. However, I’m even more excited to hop on the show with Ryan and Joel and make this TAUKing McGee a party!”Learn more information about TAUKing McGee’s late-night show at Highline Ballroom on Friday, January 19th below.– SHOW INFO –Show: Live For Live Music Presents: An Official Umphrey’s McGee After-Party with Tauking McGee feat. Joel Cummins (Umphrey’s McGee), Ryan Stasik (Umphrey’s McGee), Matt Jalbert (Tauk), Isaac Teel (Tauk), & Alric “AC” Carter (TAUK), w/ special guest Charlie Dolan (TAUK)When: Friday, January 19th, 2018Venue: Highline Ballroom –431 W 16th St, New York, NY 10011Doors: 12:00 PM / Show: 1:30 AMTickets: $23.00 adv / $25 dos / $55 VIP — (Purchase tickets here)[cover photo by Josh Timmermans & Keith Griner of Phierce Photography]last_img read more

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COVID-19 Family Life

first_imgWith the COVID-19 pandemic causing shelter-in-place orders across Georgia, families are spending more time together than ever. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension family life specialist Ted Futris offers advice on how to manage more togetherness.“Couples and families are getting lots of togetherness, and I’m here to say it’s okay to fight; not argue, but FIGHT for each other,” he said, using an acronym for feed, invest, give, have and take.Futris, a professor in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, offers the following recommendations.First and foremost, Futris says you must, “Feed your body and soul.” Take time to take care of yourself before you can take care of others.“On an airplane, you are told to put your oxygen mask on before you try to help others,” he said.Eat healthy by planning your meals and trying to avoid junk food. Get regular exercise. Go for a daily walk.Getting regular sleep is also critical. When normal routines are disrupted, schools are closed and adults are working from home, you can lose track of days and time, he said.“To try to maintain normalcy, wake up consistently at the same time and go to bed at the same time,” he said.Schedule quiet time. Futris and his wife begin their days attending a 30-minute meditation group over video conference. “This helps us manage stress and relaxation,” he said.Next, “Invest time in yourself and each other.” Focus on now and use this time to invest in family members. “Be intentional about the time you devote to your relationships,” Futris said. “Block out time to check in with each other, especially those who are alone.”Give gratitude to your partner. “Sometimes we expect our partners to do things for us, but we should take the time to show our partners respect and gratitude,” he said.Make deposits into the “love bank,” by cleaning up, cooking dinner or helping the children with homework. “Parents are having to help with homework more now and be teachers. That’s a tough job,” he said. “Make sure you say ‘thank you’ to your spouse if they are the stand-in teacher.”The next step in your FIGHT is to, “Have patience.”“It’s not always what you say, but how you say it,” Futris said. “Seek to understand and ask for clarification.”Finally, take breaks and continue to celebrate. “Maintain the traditions you had before this lockdown and remote working situation,” he said. “If you shared coffee with your spouse before work, still do that.”For more information on maintaining healthy family relationships, see the UGA Extension publications at fcs.uga.edu/extension/gamarriages.last_img read more

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Fridays on the Fly | Find a Free Orvis Fly Fishing Class in Your Area

first_imgIf you’re looking to make the leap into the often complex world of fly fishing this Spring but not quite sure where to start, check out this amazing learning opportunity offered free of charge by the venerable, Vermont-based Orvis fly fishing company.Every spring and summer at Orvis stores across the country people who have never even held a rod become novice fly anglers during a free course known as FF101.Sav Sankaran is the fishing manager at Orvis Asheville, which will be hosting its first FF101 class tomorrow. He says FF101 is a great way fom new and would-be anglers to further familiarize themselves with the ins and outs of fly fishing.“It’s a free, family-friendly introduction to fly fishing,” Sav said. “The class usually runs about two and a half hours and consists of basic fly casting instruction, as well a rigging portion that covers gear, knots, flies, etc.”Participants who complete the FF101 course and want to take their newfound knowledge to the water can go on to participate in FF201, which includes a short outing on local water.“As a company, we have put thousands of people on the water through this program since its inception several years ago, and it is one the best parts of my job,” Sav said. “I love getting people introduced to fly fishing and watching as they get excited about the sport that we all love so much!”FF101 courses will be held throughout the months of April, May, and June. All participants will walk away with some exclusive offers on Orvis gear and a complimentary membership to Trout Unlimited.To find an Orvis FF101 class near you just visit the FF101 website and click on your state.Register for the June 25 Asheville event here! [divider]More Fridays on the Fly[/divider]last_img read more

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Latin America is now nobody’s backyard, The Economist affirms

first_imgBy Dialogo September 13, 2010 Latin America is now “nobody’s backyard,” the British weekly magazine The Economist affirms in a special report devoted to this region’s rise, on the occasion of the commemoration of the bicentennials of the beginnings of the fight for independence. Over the course of fourteen pages, the prestigious British magazine lays out the reasons the subcontinent has for celebration, especially in the economic arena, and the challenges it will have to confront in order to continuing progressing, specifying that these should be “less difficult” than those entailed in putting an end to the region’s dictatorships and stabilizing its economies following the debt crisis of 1982. Among the achievements, The Economist highlights the “strong recovery” from the recent global crisis, of which Latin America was for the first time only an “innocent bystander, not a protagonist,” with projected growth for this year averaging 5% across the region. This economic renaissance is also characterized by the exit of tens of millions of people from poverty, despite the fact that the region continues to be the most unequal in the world; a fall in unemployment; and growing interest from multinational companies, due especially to the region’s enormous natural resources. The magazine nevertheless warns the region about the risk of “complacency.” According to The Economist, Latin American productivity “is growing more slowly than elsewhere” and the region “neither saves and invests sufficiently” nor can do without making efforts to educate and innovate more, as well as to improve the healthcare system. Added to this are other problems such as corruption and violence, illustrated by the “hideously high” crime rates in some countries. The Economist considers that “if relations with the United States improve,” it would make it easier to carry out the needed reforms in these areas. Although countries like Brazil, the region’s leading power, have an important role to play in dampening more anti-American attitudes, the United States’ attitude also “needs to change,” the weekly magazine notes in the editorial introducing the eight articles in the dossier. “Worries about crime and migration” in that country, in which nearly fifty million Latinos already live, “are leading it to focus on the risks in its relationship with the neighbours more than on the opportunities,” The Economist adds. “After two centuries of lagging behind, the southern and central parts of the Americas are at last fulfilling their potential. To help cement that success, their northern cousins should build bridges, not walls,” the editorial concludes.last_img read more

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