Job Placement

first_imgIt’s graduation season, and for graduating college seniors, that means it’s time to join the job market.For graduates of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture, most new alumni have job offers waiting for them, or they have been accepted into graduate school.“In general, across this entire department, we have always made it a priority that, if you got an education in our department, we would help you get you a career job or assist you in applying for graduate school,” said Paul Thomas, professor of horticulture at UGA. “We have had near 100% placement for 17 years now. Our students enjoy starting salaries at the top of the agriculture pay scale because most of our students start out in management positions. Because of the training we give them, they can command a high salary.”The department accomplishes this by requiring students to do an internship before graduation, assisting students in receiving scholarships, emphasizing the importance of extracurricular activities involving service and team efforts, and requiring that students take horticulture classes focused on professional and business practices. Classes such as greenhouse management and horticultural business practices are unique because they provide hands-on training integrated with lessons in management and professionalism, providing highly marketable skills for new graduates.“We went to the industry and said, ‘What do our students need to know to be competitive?’ From there we modified the class work and course objectives to better match the emerging job markets in the horticulture industry,” Thomas said.CAES alumnus Erik Edwards, who is now greenhouse manager for Emory University, says horticulture faculty at UGA have been key to his professional success. In fact, he feels recommendations by department staff have helped him secure he many of the positions he has held in his career.“It is not just that you are in college to get a degree,” Edwards said. “You are there for training for your next step. The horticulture professors take a lot of pride in that and make it a focus.”For more information about the UGA CAES horticulture department, visit hort.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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COVID-19 Family Life

first_imgWith the COVID-19 pandemic causing shelter-in-place orders across Georgia, families are spending more time together than ever. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension family life specialist Ted Futris offers advice on how to manage more togetherness.“Couples and families are getting lots of togetherness, and I’m here to say it’s okay to fight; not argue, but FIGHT for each other,” he said, using an acronym for feed, invest, give, have and take.Futris, a professor in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, offers the following recommendations.First and foremost, Futris says you must, “Feed your body and soul.” Take time to take care of yourself before you can take care of others.“On an airplane, you are told to put your oxygen mask on before you try to help others,” he said.Eat healthy by planning your meals and trying to avoid junk food. Get regular exercise. Go for a daily walk.Getting regular sleep is also critical. When normal routines are disrupted, schools are closed and adults are working from home, you can lose track of days and time, he said.“To try to maintain normalcy, wake up consistently at the same time and go to bed at the same time,” he said.Schedule quiet time. Futris and his wife begin their days attending a 30-minute meditation group over video conference. “This helps us manage stress and relaxation,” he said.Next, “Invest time in yourself and each other.” Focus on now and use this time to invest in family members. “Be intentional about the time you devote to your relationships,” Futris said. “Block out time to check in with each other, especially those who are alone.”Give gratitude to your partner. “Sometimes we expect our partners to do things for us, but we should take the time to show our partners respect and gratitude,” he said.Make deposits into the “love bank,” by cleaning up, cooking dinner or helping the children with homework. “Parents are having to help with homework more now and be teachers. That’s a tough job,” he said. “Make sure you say ‘thank you’ to your spouse if they are the stand-in teacher.”The next step in your FIGHT is to, “Have patience.”“It’s not always what you say, but how you say it,” Futris said. “Seek to understand and ask for clarification.”Finally, take breaks and continue to celebrate. “Maintain the traditions you had before this lockdown and remote working situation,” he said. “If you shared coffee with your spouse before work, still do that.”For more information on maintaining healthy family relationships, see the UGA Extension publications at fcs.uga.edu/extension/gamarriages.last_img read more

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Manpower named to World’s Most Ethical Companies

first_imgManpower Named to 2008 ‘World’s Most Ethical Companies’ ListBurlington, VT June 12, 2008 – Manpower has been named to the second annual World”s Most Ethical Companies list by the Ethisphere Institute. Ethisphere, a think-tank dedicated to the research and promotion of profitable best practices in global governance, business ethics and corporate responsibility, reviewed more than 10,000 companies on six continents to prepare the 2008 list.”Manpower is honored to be affirmed for its commitment to ethics and social responsibility,” said Amanda Niklaus of the Vermont office. “Every day, on a global basis, and right here in Vermont, we set out to do the right thing for people who come to us looking for a job.”Researchers and analysts used a rigorous, multi-step evaluation process to determine the finalists. The 2008 World’s Most Ethical Companies methodology committee is comprised of leading attorneys, government officials, professors and others who care about ethical and honest business practices.Manpower was recognized for developing impressive and meaningful ethical business practices. Said Alexander Bringham, executive director of the Ethisphere Institute: “They go well beyond legal minimums, opting instead to bring about innovative ideas that contribute to the public well being. By their actions, Manpower is forcing competitors to follow suit, or fall behind and truly embodying the notion that ethical business practices are more profitable in the long run.”Manpower has been a part of the Vermont community for 42.About Manpower of VermontManpower of Vermont is a leader in the employment services industry; creating and delivering services that enable its clients to win in the changing world of work. The company offers employers a range of services for the entire employment and business cycle including permanent, temporary and contract recruitment; employee assessment and selection; training; outplacement; outsourcing and consulting. The focus of Manpowers work is on raising productivity through improved quality, efficiency and cost-reduction across their total workforce, enabling clients to concentrate on their core business activities. Manpower Inc. operates under five brands: Manpower, Manpower Professional, Elan, Jefferson Wells and Right Management. More information about Manpower is available at us.manpower.com/pressroom.###last_img read more

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Vermont Board of Education announces new officers

first_imgThe State Board of Education elected new officers at its September 15, 2009 meeting, the Department of Education announced today. Fayneese Miller of South Burlington was elected Board chair, Ruth Stokes of Williston will continue serving as co-vice-chair, along with Kathy Larsen of Wilmington as second vice-chair.The election was necessitated by the retirement of Chair Tom James. The governor recently appointed Stephan Morse of Newfane to complete the term vacated by James. Morse s first Board meeting will be on October 20.Miller of South Burlington is the Dean of the College of Education and Social Services at University of Vermont. She came to Vermont after a 20-year career at Brown University where she was associate professor of education and human development and an internationally recognized expert on the social, academic and political development of adolescents. She led Brown s Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity and was the university s first coordinator and chair of ethnic studies. Her State Board term will expire in 2012.Stokes has been a Board member since 2005. Since 1999, she has been the Executive Director of the Vermont Student Opportunity Scholarship Fund (VTSOS). From 1989 to 1992, she served as a state representative for Williston and Richmond. In addition, Stokes was a member of the University of Vermont Board of Trustees from 1989 to 1995, serving the last two years as chair. She served as a member of her town s school board from 1975 to 1987, serving the last six years as chair. Stokes has also served on the executive board of the Vermont School Boards Association, and has taught high school science. Her State Board term will end in 2011.Kathy Larsen of Wilmington spent her 33-year career teaching Vermont students. She spent one year as a paraprofessional, 24 years as a primary grade teacher, and eight as an elementary teaching principal. After one year in Williston, she spent the rest of her career at Deerfield Valley Elementary School, retiring in 2005. She also does mentoring and Formative Assessment Project trainings, as well as some substitute teaching to stay in touch with students and acting as interim principal. She serves as a member of the advisory board for the Wings Community Program afterschool program and the Deerfield Valley Health Care Volunteers local healthcare assistance program. Her term expires in 2013.In addition, student member Robert Kelley of Brandon, who was appointed by Governor Douglas to the Board in August, participated in his first meeting. He is also a student school board member at Otter Valley Union High School.Source: Vermont DOE. 9.15.2009last_img read more

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Shelburne Museum wins $96,000 in grants for economic recovery and technology

first_imgShelburne Museum, Inc.,Shelburne Museum has been awarded two grants totaling $96,318 for technology and support of museum operations, interim director Robert Skiff, Sr. announced.A grant for $93,000 from the Henry Luce Foundation was awarded as part of the foundation’s American Art Renewal Fund. The foundation developed the American Art Renewal Fund to respond to the economic downturn and the current need to strengthen American art activities at the nation’s museums. The grant will be used to support curatorial activities and staff.The second award is from the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership for touch-screen oral history listening stations on the museum’s National Historic Landmark steamboat Ticonderoga. The $3,318 grant will update technology on the boat and allow for additional oral histories to be presented about the Ticonderoga, the last commercially operating steamboat on Lake Champlain. The 220-foot steamboat was moved to the museum in 1955 and is a perennial favorite exhibit among visitors.About Shelburne Museum:  Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont is one of North America’s finest, most diverse and unconventional museums of art, design and Americana. Over 150,000 works are exhibited in a remarkable setting of 39 exhibition buildings, 25 of which are historic and were relocated to the museum grounds.  The museum’s collection includes works by the great Impressionists Claude Monet, Edouard Manet and Edgar Degas as well as a prized collection of folk art including trade signs, weathervanes and quilts. SHELBURNE, Vt. ‘ (Aug. 1, 2011)last_img read more

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Veteran WCAX-TV reporter Andy Potter announces retirement

first_imgWCAX-TV is the CBS affiliate in Burlington, VT and is owned and operated by Mt. Mansfield Television, Inc. WCAX. 9.23.2011 Award-winning Reporter Andy Potter announced his retirement from WCAX-TV this month after 14 years in front of the camera.  The longtime journalist decided it was time to slow down after a series of health issues related to knee replacement surgery. ‘It’s been an honor to be able to tell the stories of Vermonters over the years,’ stated Potter, who is also a veteran of the Vietnam War.  ‘I am looking forward to a slower beat in the days ahead,’ added Potter, a Middlebury College grad, whose affinity for Vermont has spanned decades. From reporting on strikes to special elections, Potter has received numerous awards. His broadcast career includes television and radio; before becoming a TV journalist, Potter worked at several radio stations in Chittenden County.  ‘With sharp intuition, booming voice, and crisp writing, Andy Potter was often the first to report the news of the day,’ said WCAX-TV News Director Anson Tebbetts. ‘Andy has promised he will help us with special projects,’ added Tebbetts, ‘so don’t be surprised to see Andy in the future.’ last_img read more

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