Puget Sound Energy’s Rock the Bulb™: The Re-Energize Tour 2012 coming…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 About Puget Sound EnergyWashington state’s oldest local energy company, Puget Sound Energy serves 1.1 million electric customers and more than 750,000 natural gas customers in 11 counties. A subsidiary of Puget Energy, PSE meets the energy needs of its customers, in part, through cost-effective energy efficiency, procurement of sustainable energy resources, and far-sighted investment in energy-delivery infrastructure. PSE employees are dedicated to providing great customer service that is safe, dependable and efficient. For more information, visit www.PSE.com. OLYMPIA, Wash. – Puget Sound Energy residential electric customers in Thurston County can save energy and money by participating in Rock the BulbTM: The Re-Energize Tour 2012 at the Yelm Goodwill in the SunbirdShopping Center, 906 E. Yelm Ave., Aug. 18-19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.“The City of Yelm welcomes Puget Sound Energy to our community,” said Yelm Mayor Ron Harding. “The City recognizes the value of energy conservation and through partnerships such as this we are able to bring multiple benefits to our residents.”Customers who attend Rock the Bulb can exchange up to 15 of their old inefficient incandescent bulbs for the same number of free compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs, choosing from among five different styles. Throughout the summer PSE’s Rock the Bulb Street Team and Re-Energize van will be visiting a variety of local community events, festivals and public locations, engaging customers with free CFL bulbs and Rock the Bulb Backstage Passes. By bringing their Backstage Pass to the Rock the Bulb exchange event, with their account number, customers will receive two bonus CFL bulbs, for a total of 17 free CFL bulbs. Customers can also look for a Backstage Pass in their PSE bill or by postcard from PSE.ENERGY STAR-qualified CFL bulbs use up to 78 percent less energy than incandescent bulbs and last up to 10 times longer. By replacing the 15 most frequently used inefficient lights in the home with CFL bulbs, households can save more than $600 in energy costs over the life of the bulbs.“We are excited to bring Rock the Bulb: The Re-Energize Tour 2012 to customers who are ready to save energy and money by switching to CFL bulbs,” said Casey Cochrane, PSE’s local government and community relations manager. “We have many ways for customers to save energy and money beyond CFL bulbs and we can’t wait to share the information.”At Rock the Bulb exchange events, customers can visit the ‘Appliances that Rock!’ tent to enter to win a new ENERGY STAR-qualified Gladiator Chillerator® garage refrigerator, the only refrigerator designed specifically for the garage from Whirlpool. Customers can also participate in energy efficient games and activities, and learn more about PSE’s programs to help save energy and stay safe around electricity and natural gas at home. Customers who visit all three activity stations and take a pledge to be more energy efficient at home will receive a free WaterSense®-labeled premium-efficiency showerhead. Local radio stations, Mixx 96.1 and South Sound Country 96.9 KAYO will also broadcast live from the Rock the Bulb exchange event Aug. 18 and 19 to encourage customers to participate, be more energy efficient, and give customers a chance to win free home safety kits and other prizes.Rock the Bulb: The Re-Energize Tour 2012 will distribute 100,000 free CFL bulbs to PSE residential customers at four weekend bulb-exchange events from June through September at local retailers and through outreach at local community events in the utility’s service area.PSE’s Rock the Bulb: The Re-Energize Tour 2012 will also be held at these locations:Aug. 18-19, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.: Yelm, Goodwill, Sunbird Shopping CenterSept. 29-30, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.: Cle Elum, Lot next to Pioneer Coffee, at Main and PennsylvaniaFor more information on Rock the Bulb: The-Re-Energize Tour 2012 visit PSE.com/RocktheBulb. To learn more about energy-efficiency rebates and incentives to Re-Energize your home, call a PSE Energy Advisor at 1-800-562-1482, Monday through Friday, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. or visit PSE.com/ReEnergize.last_img read more

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Spring Cleaning – Clearing the Clutter to Heal from Loss

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0 Joan Hitchens, long-time Olympia resident and life coach, helps people move forward from grief.Many people think of spring cleaning as a day to buckle down and do the hard tasks we put off throughout the year – scrub the baseboards, wash the exterior windows, clean out the closets.After the loss of a loved one, there is a tendency to hang on to physical items belonging to the person you lost.  This is a normal response and part of the grieving process.  However, there comes a point when doing some “spring cleaning” on your grief is a necessary step towards healing.Joan Hitchens, founder of Navigating Grief and the Discover-Create-Share Center in Olympia, shares that “the fear of forgetting someone is one of the hardest parts of loss.  We think if we get rid of their ‘things’ that we are losing them all over again.”  But she also shares there is tremendous emotional pull connected with the belongings of someone who is gone.  They hold memories and therefore become entwined in the fear of forgetting that beloved person.“Part of the process of going through and looking at the physical items, a room, furniture or the clothing of someone you loved,” explains Hitchens, “is asking yourself whether it’s a memory you are holding onto or whether it’s the physical ‘stuff’.”Often, it’s the memory that we wish to hold tight in our hearts.  Hitchens suggests taking a photo of the item and writing a story to go along with it, keeping it safe in a scrapbook or memory box. This allows people to get rid of the physical clutter and keep the memory, ultimately helping move towards healing.This is just one idea for dealing with the physical clutter that may be holding up your journey through grief.  Hitchens has a myriad of solutions for clutter, physical and mental, and helps clients find the right one for them.“What’s most important is to learn to make the best of the memories you have and a way to keep them safe – a book, a photo, a story.  It’s an important part of holding the person in your heart forever,” shares Hitchens.Navigating Grief will be hosting a Spring Cleaning after Loss Workshop and Showcase on April 12.  For more information about this event, click here.To learn more about Joan Hitchens, click here.last_img read more

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Quick Action Contains Boat Fire at West Bay Marina

first_imgSubmitted by City of OlympiaOlympia Firefighters responded to a boat fire at West Bay Marina, 2100 West Bay Drive NW. The call came in at 2:40 pm, with first units seeing a plume of smoke well before arrival. The first fire unit arrived at 2:45 and reported a working fire on the dock with possibly multiple boats involved.The first arriving engine extended lines to the fire and began extinguishing the fire. Due the potential for spread, a second alarm was called to bring more equipment and personnel to the scene. It was quickly determined that only one boat was on fire. The fire was knocked down while boats from the Olympia Harbor Patrol, Port of Olympia and the marina moved adjoining boats to safety. The fire was contained to the boat of origin which burned down to the deck line, several feet above the waterline. The vessel did not sink but did sustain heavy damage.One person on a nearby boat was treated by paramedics at the scene and transported to Providence St. Peter Hospital with non-specific complaints following being in the area of the fire. He is expected to be fine.Olympia Fire Department responded with 4 engines, 1 ladder truck, 2 medic units, and a command unit. The call for a second alarm brought units from Fire Districts 3, 6, 9, 13 and City of Tumwater. There were no injuries to firefighters.The State of Washington Department of Natural Resources and Department of Ecology also responded to assure that the environment was being protected during the firefight. The boat did not sink, little or no fuel was released and the marina staff quickly used booms to prevent anything from the boat floating away.Olympia Fire Department remained on scene to assist the marina personnel and investigate the fire. The restaurant at West Bay Marina, Tug Boat Annie’s, remained open throughout the event. Facebook56Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Help Stop the Spread of Diseases in Washington—Get Vaccinated

first_imgSubmitted by Thurston County Public HealthCounty health officials urge vaccinations for measles, chickenpox, whooping cough and flu  Thurston County health officials are alerting the public that cases of measles, chickenpox whooping cough and the flu have been confirmed in Washington state in the last month. Health officials point out that these illnesses are all preventable with vaccines, and that those who have not yet been vaccinated should protect themselves and other vulnerable people from the diseases and their complications by getting immunized.“All of these diseases have the risk of very serious complications, and in some cases can even lead to death. But the good news is that every one of these diseases is preventable with a simple vaccine,” said Dr. Rachel Wood, Health Officer for Lewis and Thurston counties. “I would encourage anyone who has not yet been vaccinated for measles, chickenpox, whooping cough or the flu to talk to their health care provider about getting vaccinated as soon as possible. And getting vaccinated is not just good for your own health, it helps prevent the spread of these diseases amongst your family, friends, and the community.”MeaslesMeasles is very contagious. The virus travels through the air—that means if you’re not immune to measles, you can become infected if you go near someone who has the virus, even if they aren’t yet showing symptoms. A person who hasn’t been immunized against measles will most likely get it if exposed. Symptoms appear between seven and 21 days after exposure, and include fever, runny nose, cough and a rash that covers the body. Complications can include pneumonia, and in rare cases even death. Pregnant women who contract the virus are at risk of giving birth prematurely or miscarrying.ChickenpoxChickenpox (varicella zoster virus) is highly contagious and causes a blister-like rash, itching, fatigue and fever. The rash appears first on the torso and face and can spread over the entire body. The virus is spread from person-to-person contact with the fluid from the rash, through airborne exposure (coughing and sneezing) or by droplets. Symptoms of chickenpox typically appear 10 to 21 days after exposure. An individual with chickenpox is contagious up five days before the rash starts and until all blisters have formed scabs. Individuals at highest risk of getting the chickenpox include those who have not yet had it, or have not been vaccinated against it. Serious complications can occur in those with weakened immune systems, infants and pregnant women.Whooping CoughPertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory disease that spreads from person to person through coughing or sneezing. Symptoms can develop within five to 21 days of exposure, but usually appear within seven to 10 days. The disease usually starts with cold-like symptoms (runny nose, low-grade fever, and a mild cough), but can cause a dangerous pause in breathing called apnea in infants. After one to two weeks, severe coughing can begin, which can lead to coughing fits that continue for weeks. Pertussis can cause illness in infants, children and adults and can be life-threatening, especially for infants.FluInfluenza, commonly known as the flu, is a contagious respiratory illness that can cause mild to severe illness. Symptoms appear between one to four days after exposure, and include sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, body aches and non-productive cough. Complications of the flu can lead to hospitalization or even death. Older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions are at high risk for serious flu complications. While this year’s flu vaccine is less effective at preventing the flu than in previous years, health officials still recommend getting vaccinated—getting the flu vaccine can lessen the severity of the illness and how long you’re sick. Antiviral medications are recommended for those who get the flu and are at high risk of complications.Unvaccinated individuals who are exposed to or become ill with measles, chickenpox or whooping cough should stay home from school or work. “One infected person who is contagious can spread the disease to other susceptible people,” said Dr. Wood. “Isolation of individuals who are ill with disease, and quarantine of people who may be incubating an illness are ways that public health prevents further spread of a disease.” If there are many cases of illness, unvaccinated individuals may be required to stay away from a work place, school or daycare to help stop the spread of the illness. And because these diseases have incubation periods of up to 21 days, unvaccinated individuals may be required to stay away for three weeks or longer, depending on the duration of the outbreak.If you or a family member is not yet vaccinated for measles, chickenpox, whooping cough or the flu, now is the time get those vaccines. Check with your healthcare provider about how many doses you and your family need.If you or a family member are net yet immune to measles, chickenpox, or pertussis and develop symptoms, please contact your health care provider before visiting the office. If you develop symptoms of the flu and are in a high risk category for developing complications, see your healthcare provider as soon as possible to start antiviral medications.For more information about vaccines and stopping the spread of communicable diseases, visit the Thurston County Public Health and Social Services website at www.co.thurston.wa.us/health. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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