Flower power

first_imgBy Cat HolmesUniversity of GeorgiaScientists are researching bloodroot, a native Eastern wildflower with antimicrobial properties, to find out the best way to propagate it as a commercial crop.”Bloodroot is rich in alkaloids which have antibiotic properties,” said Jim Affolter, a horticulturist who is leading the studies in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Companies in Europe are starting to use it in animal feed to improve appetite and digestion. It’s a potentially enormous market,” Affolter said.”Bloodroot isn’t terribly hard to grow, but it hasn’t been produced on a commercial scale. It’s not rare, but it’s not common, either,” he said. “Natural populations could easily be decimated if industry production sent people out to scour the forests the way the ginseng market has done.”Bloodroot’s most-studied alkaloid is called sanguinarine (sang-GWEN-uh-reen), which has proven antimicrobial properties, said UGA horticulture researcher Selima Campbell.Sanguinarine is used as a feed additive for livestock in Europe, in the same way antibiotics have been used as growth promoters for U.S. livestock. In 1998, the European Union banned the use of all antibiotics used in human medicine for livestock production.A representative of German-based Phytobiotics, an animal feedstock additive company, visited the UGA Athens campus recently to meet with scientists on bloodroot’s potential as a commercial crop. One of their products, Sangrovit, contains sanguinarine.The Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization say banning human-use antibiotics from livestock feed will help protect people from new, drug-resistant bacteria, which the CDC calls one of the world’s most pressing public health problems.To grow bloodroot for its sanguinarine, UGA researchers are focusing on three unknowns, Campbell said.The first is to find where exactly in the plant and when during its growth cycle sanguinarine concentrations are highest. This will determine what part of the plant is harvested and when.”Preliminary results show that the sanguinarine is allocated to the rhizome,” Campbell said. “(That) is the source of bloodroot’s name. When the ‘root’ (rhizome) of bloodroot is cut, it ‘bleeds’ a bright red substance containing a number of different, potent alkaloids.”A second unknown is how bloodroot responds to differing sunlight levels. Bloodroot flowers in woodland areas in early spring, before the trees have leafed out. It then lives out the rest of it’s cycle in the shade.Researchers want to know if seasonal changes in photosynthesis and light levels affect the sanguinarine concentrations. This could tell them the best ways to grow it to get the most sanguinarine.The final area of study is its propagation.”Right now, bloodroot is wild-gathered,” Campbell said. “It’s a slow-growing plant, so gathering it by the ton would definitely stress natural populations. It’s crucial to develop a way to propagate the plants.”By the time they’re through, the UGA scientists hope to know the best growing conditions for bloodroot. “This would allow growers to exert quality control over the product, conserve wild plants and be a new source of economic development,” Campbell said.While bloodroot’s use in oral hygiene products and animal feedstock is recent, its medicinal history is centuries old, Affolter said. “Bloodroot was used for centuries by native Americans to dye their clothing and paint their faces,” he said. “They also used it to treat skin cancers and fungal growths.”Southerners have harvested bloodroot from the wild since post-Colonial times. “They used it as an emetic, an expectorant for bronchitis and a gargle for sore throats,” Affolter said.(Cat Holmes is a science writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Does your overdraft program leave you open to a lawsuit?

first_imgWhat’s the difference between a service-oriented, fully disclosed overdraft program that is clearly and responsibly presented to account holders … and one that is used solely to earn revenue, at all costs? In the case of TCF Financial Corp., it’s $30 million dollars and a major blow to its reputation.You may have heard that TCF recently agreed to the large payment to resolve accusationsthat it misled its account holders about its overdraft program.But here’s the interesting part: the bank did not technically break any compliance rules with their overdraft services. They did admit, however, that from 2010 to 2013, their account holders may not have fully understood their options for accepting or rejecting the service.Misleading Instead of Serving According to reports, TCF employed questionable tactics to get account holders to sign up for its overdraft program. The company allegedly asked new customers to accept the overdraft program at the same time they were accepting other mandatory terms and conditions related to opening an account. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Former teller admits to embezzling $165,000

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » A former teller at the $121 million West Virginia Federal Credit Union in South Charleston will be sentenced in January after admitting in federal court that she embezzled $165,500, the state’s U.S. Attorney Mike Stuart said last week.Frances McComas, 56, stole the cash from the credit union’s vault from 2015 to April 2019. She falsified financial records to hide the embezzlement, federal prosecutors said.Court documents do not reveal how McComas managed to conceal the cash on her person when she left the branch after her work shift or how she spent the stolen funds.Although the former credit union employee could face up to a maximum of 30 years in federal prison and five years of supervised release, she is likely to receive a lighter sentence for signing a plea deal that requires McComas to fully cooperate with federal prosecutors in their ongoing investigation.last_img read more

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Rugby looks for team support to enter the super league

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10 Good Reasons to Change the Anti-Smacking Law – Reason #2 – “Mike”

first_imgTHE YOUTUBE VIDEO POLITICIANS DON’T WANT NZ PARENTS TO SEEIn 2007, politicians changed the laws making it illegal for parents to use smacking as form of correction with their children. The referendum in 2009 revealed that 87% of New Zealanders opposed this move believing that it wouldn’t solve genuine child abuse but would lead to good parents being unjustly persecuted.To assuage these fears, John Key stated that “If I see good parents getting criminalised for lightly smacking their children for the purposes of discipline, I’m going to change the law.”Here’s the evidence. This short clip is just one of 10 Good Reasons to Change the Anti-Smacking LawTo see ALL the evidence, go to www.protectgoodparents.org.nzWatch “Mum on a Mission” (2014) at www.protectgoodparents.org.nzWatch “My Mummy’s A Criminal” (2011) at www.protectgoodparents.org.nzlast_img read more

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Ndidi, Iheanacho miss out on Champions League spot, as Leicester City bow to Man Utd

first_imgAfter 298 days in the top-four spots in the longest season in recent memory, Leicester city of Wilfred Ndidi and Kelechi Iheanacho, have missed out on Champions League football, losing 0-2 to Manchester United. A win on the final day was all that was needed to return to Europe’s top table, but another valiant effort ended in defeat, Bruno Fernandes’ penalty and Jesse Lingard’s very late tap-in separating the sides. City were very good for much of the match, but just like the story of the season, they did not have enough to get over the line. They huffed, they puffed, and they tested David de Gea, but they could not find a way through and have to settle for fifth.Advertisement Loading… It is the fifth best season in City’s history, and yet it will feel like a huge disappointment. City had a 14-point cushion inside the top four at the start of the year, but their bottom-half form since then, with Brendan Rodgers’ side hit with crucial injuries, saw them slip down the table, eventually falling out of the Champions League places in the final week of the campaign. In a huge final-day showdown, it looked like they might do it. United were nervy, and City had chances, Iheanacho scuffing at De Gea, Golden Boot winner Jamie Vardy heading against the bar. read also:Leicester City striker ‘offered’ to Premier League rivals But when it came to the crunch, City lost their head. Hamza Choudhury lost the ball and Anthony Martial was fouled in the box, Fernandes converting. City tried to mount a comeback, but in the frustrating final moments, Jonny Evans was sent off and Kasper Schmeichel was robbed by Lingard. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Ba relishes competition with Torres

first_img He added: “But we are not rivals, no chance. You learn a lot from having competition with players like this – it’s good for me. “I’m getting better and better.” Ba has made a good impression in his first four months at Stamford Bridge, scoring six goals and often looking the team’s most dangerous attacking threat. The Senegal international does feel he owes something to Benitez, who leaves his post as interim boss after this weekend’s friendly against Manchester City in New York. Ba, speaking at a Chelsea youth soccer clinic in Harlem, said: “It’s been good since I came and he (Benitez) has been good. “He made good rotation between me and Fernando. “I have had the chance to play a lot of games since I came and that has been really good. I have learned a lot, about new team-mates and the way Chelsea plays football. I’m very happy.” Outgoing manager Rafael Benitez tended to rotate his principal forwards after Ba arrived from Newcastle in January but with Benitez moving on and Ba’s ineligibility for European football no longer an issue, that could change under the next manager. When asked if the pair could play together, Ba said: “We could do. He is a good man. We will have to see the view of the manager who is going to come in. We will have to see what he will bring to the team and if he can play two strikers, how he wants it.” Chelsea striker Demba Ba would relish more competition with Fernando Torres next season – but is also keen to partner the Spaniard.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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ICC World Cup 1987 World Cup: Australia lord over the old enemy

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Australia made 270/6 and Navjot Singh Sidhu led the charge with a blazing 73. However, Craig McDermott’s 4/56 and Steve Waugh held their nerve as Australia won the match by one run. Australia survived some close encounters and barring the loss in the first match, India dominated the rest of the games with Sunil Gavaskar scoring his first and only century in the game against New Zealand in Nagpur, a match known for Chetan Sharma’s hat-trick.West Indies, the two-time champions, failed to replicate their dominance as they lost close games to England and Pakistan. The two teams entered the final, with Pakistan squaring off against Australia and India taking on England. In the semi-final at Lahore, Australia was boosted by an aggressive 65 from David Boon as they reached 267/6. In response, Javed Miandad struck 70 but Craig McDermott’s 5/44 gave Australia a tense 18-run win. In the second semi-final, Graham Gooch’s brilliant 115 helped England break Indian hearts as the hosts lost by 35 runs to crash out of the tournament.In the final between Australia and England in front of a packed Eden Gardens crowd, Australia chose to bat and a brilliant 75 from Boon combined with an aggressive 31-ball 45 from Mike Veletta helped Australia reach 253/5. Mike Gatting and Allan Lamb put England on course but when Gatting perished to Allan Border in attempting a reverse sweep, England lost their way and they lost by seven runs. Australia had conquered the final frontier in grand style.Most runs: Graham Gooch of England. Runs: 471. Average: 58.87Most wickets: Craig McDermott of Australia. Wickets: 18. Average:  18.94Venue: India and Pakistan New Delhi: The 1987 World Cup was revolutionary in plenty of ways. For the first time, the tournament was shifted out of England. It was hosted by two countries. India and Pakistan were the co-hosts of the ICC Cricket World Cup and the matches were reduced to 50-overs per side. Prudential, who had hosted the first three editions of the World Cup, was now replaced by Reliance, an Indian firm run by Dhirubhai Ambani at that time. The matches involved plenty of action and there were many memorable moments. In the end, Australia overcame the conditions and the odds to register their first World Cup triumph.Prior to their World Cup in 1987, Australia was involved in an epic Test series against India in 1986 and the tour was memorable due to the tied Test match at Chennai. The first encounter was once again between these two sides in Chepauk and the match was an absolute classic. Geoff Marsh led the charge with a brilliant century. During Dean Jones innings, the batsman lofted a shot straight down the ground and Ravi Shastri failed to catch it. The ball went over and the umpire declared it a four. However, the Australians did not believe it was a four and after a discussion with the umpires, the decision was changed to a six. The 1987 World Cup was held outside England for the first time.The ODI was reduced to 50-overs per side in this tournament. India crashed out in the semi-final against England at the Wankhede. highlightslast_img read more

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Bonner, Warde and Carter fined for code breaches

first_imgLEEWARD Island Hurricanes pair of Nkrumah Bonner and Terence Warde as well as Barbados Pride left-hander Jonathan Carter were all fined for breaches of the Code of Conduct during the fourth round of matches which ended on Sunday in the Digicel 4-Day Championship.All three players admitted to their offences and accepted the imposition of the proposed sanctions so there was no need for formal hearings.Bonner and Warde were reported by on-field umpires Carl Tuckett and Leslie Reifer Jr, along with reserve umpire Bernard Joseph, for Level 1 breaches of the Code of Conduct during the match between the Hurricanes and Jamaica Scorpions at Warner Park in Basseterre, St. Kitts.Bonner’s breach was upgraded to Level 2, due to this being his second breach within a year, and match referee Stewart Rawlins imposed a fine of 50 percent of the player’s match fee. The player breached paragraph 1.2 of the Code of Conduct by showing dissent at an umpire’s decision when he showed his bat in obvious disappointment after being adjudged lbw in the 56th over of the Hurricanes’ first innings.Rawlins however, imposed a fine of 10 percent of Warde’s match fee, after he similarly, breached paragraph 1.2 of the Code of Conduct by showing dissent at an umpire’s decision, when he showed his bat in obvious disappointment after being adjudged lbw in the 49th over of the Hurricanes’ second innings.Carter was reported by on-field umpires Deighton Butler and Verdayne Smith, along with reserve umpire Roger Davis, for a Level 1 breach of the Code of Conduct during the match between the Pride and Windward Islands Volcanoes at the Arnos Vale Sports Complex in Kingstown, St. Vincent.Match referee Carlyle Felix imposed a fine of 50 percent of Carter’s match fee after the Pride player breached paragraph 1.3 of the Code of Conduct by using language that was obscene, offensive or insulting towards Volcanoes’ off-spinner Shane Shillingford when leaving the field following his dismissal in his side’s second innings.last_img read more

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McDonald relishes new leadership role

first_imgMasked by a genuine humbleness in tone, there lies an air of confidence in the voice of junior safety T.J. McDonald.Mr. Dependable · Junior safety T.J. McDonald will be asked to anchor a secondary that struggled mightily in its first year under coach Lane Kiffin. – Daily Trojan file photoIt takes no longer than 10 seconds into a conversation with him to understand if things are to turn around for USC assistant coach Monte Kiffin’s defensive unit in 2011, it will most certainly start with McDonald’s youthful optimism and lead-by-example mentality.Last year’s defensive ineptitude (USC gave up 400 yards and 26.7 points per game) is quite possibly out of sight, out of mind for the second-year starting safety.“It’s the best defense I have been a part of in my three years,” McDonald said about this year’s defense. “Looking back on my freshman year, we had Taylor Mays, Malcolm Smith, Will Thomas and Josh Pinkard. And to be honest we have those same caliber players right here this year. People think it’s just about me, it’s not.”His sentiments seem genuine. If there’s anything you should know about the captain of the secondary, it’s that he chooses his words carefully.Some lead by chanting and yelling during team huddles, but McDonald, who led the team with 89 tackles in 2010, chooses to back up his calculated statements with game-changing hits and a knack for hunting down ball carriers.“Anyone can be a vocal guy, but I try to make sure I’m saying something by my actions on the field,” McDonald said. “I sort of became a leader last year, by the way I studied the game, the fact that I was never satisfied and always wanted more.”It’s no wonder McDonald feels a natural inclination to lead. His father, six-time NFL Pro Bowler Tim McDonald, was an All-American safety for the Trojans in 1986 and went on to play 13 seasons professionally. Though it would be easy to hide in the shadow of his father’s success, the Fresno, Calif. native admits honoring the family name serves as motivation, not as a distraction.“My father’s the guy who taught me the game of football, and also the one who instilled in me an appreciation for the game,” McDonald said. “I want this so bad because I consider myself round two of the McDonald family legacy at USC. I have big shoes to fill, and I’m not going to fill those just by showing up.”Those big shoes don’t apply to just his surname. USC’s current star safety falls in a long line of other talented Trojans who have made a name for themselves at the position — former teammate Taylor Mays, 2010 NFL Defensive Player of the Year Troy Polamalu and Hall of Famer Ronnie Lott to name a few.But don’t expect McDonald to shy away from the limelight that comes with playing the position at USC, either.“If you don’t have the confidence to believe that you are one of the best safeties in the nation, you’re not in the right area of work,” McDonald said. “With all due respect to everyone else, I am not out here to be the best safety on my team or in the conference, I am here to be the best in the country.”Although McDonald glows about the night-and-day transformation the defense has undergone over the last eight months, the disappointment from last year’s season, the worst statistically since 1955, is still readily noticeable.“I know the entire defense came out playing hard with a chip on our shoulder,” McDonald said. “It was an experience that was probably needed. And because of it, our team chemistry is now to the point where we have become brothers out here. It might sound cliché, but we have become a real family.”As a sense of the unknown continues to envelop the so-called family, while it prepares this fall at Howard Jones Field, Kiffin believes McDonald’s team-first attitude is not lost on his teammates.“He’s so important to our defense because of those leadership skills,” Kiffin said. “He leads in ways you can’t see on the field, both in the weight room and during off-season conditioning drills. His teammates pick up on that.”Despite the mounting pressure for the junior to lead a defense out of its recent futile past, McDonald enters 2011 with a necessary dose of swagger and unwavering self-assurance.“Wherever the ball goes, I am going to be there,” McDonald said.last_img read more

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