Anne Hathaway Apologizes Amid ‘The Witches’ Controversy

first_img– Advertisement – Her turn to apologize. Anne Hathaway expressed remorse and showed support for people with disabilities after some within the community called out her character in The Witches.“I have recently learned that many people with limb differences, especially children, are in pain because of the portrayal of the Grand High Witch in The Witches,” the actress, 37, wrote via Instagram on Thursday, November 5. “Let me begin by saying I do my best to be sensitive to the feelings and experiences of others not out of some scrambling PC fear, but because not hurting others seems like a basic level of decency we should all be striving for.”Anne Hathaway Apologizes Amid Controversy Over Her The Witches CharacterAnne Hathaway as Grand High Witch in ‘The Witches’. Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures- Advertisement – Hathaway emphasized that she did not realize the impact her character’s depiction would have on some viewers. “As someone who really believes in inclusivity and really, really detests cruelty, I owe you all an apology for the pain caused. I am sorry,” she continued. “I did not connect limb difference with the GHW when the look of the character was brought to me; if I had, I assure you this never would have happened.”As the mother of sons Jonathan, 4, and Jack, whom she welcomed in 2019, she pointed out her sensitivity to the kind of reactions she saw from fans. “I particularly want to say I’m sorry to kids with limb differences: now that I know better I promise I’ll do better,” she noted. “And I owe a special apology to everyone who loves you as fiercely as I love my own kids: I’m sorry I let your family down.”The Oscar winner then encouraged her Instagram followers to watch the accompanying video from Lucky Fin Project, which raises awareness for individuals affected by limb differences, and explore “the #NotAWitch hashtag to get a more inclusive and necessary perspective on limb difference.”Anne Hathaway Apologizes Amid Controversy Over Her The Witches CharacterAnne Hathaway. AFF-USA/Shutterstock- Advertisement – A Warner Bros. spokesperson told Us Weekly in a statement earlier this week that the company was “deeply saddened to learn that our depiction of the fictional characters in The Witches could upset people with disabilities” and “regretted any offense caused” by the movie.The spokesperson added that Warner Bros. “worked with designers and artists to come up with a new interpretation of the cat-like claws that are described in the book” but viewers were not supposed “to feel that the fantastical, non-human creatures were meant to represent them.”Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! Hathaway’s character in The Witches, which was released in October, is shown with missing fingers, similar to the condition ectrodactyly (or “split hand”). British Paralympic swimmer Amy Marren was one of the activists who slammed the HBO Max film.“It’s upsetting to something that makes a person different being represented as something scary,” she tweeted on Monday, November 2. “Yes, I am fully aware that this is a film, and these are Witches. But Witches are essentially monsters. My fear is that children will watch this film, unaware that it massively exaggerates the Roald Dahl original and that limb differences begin to be feared. This opens up all new difficult conversations for those with limb differences and sets back what we are trying to achieve which is to celebrate who you are!”- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Reba McEntire Turned Down ‘The Voice’ Before Blake Shelton Joined

first_img– Advertisement – The Voice was not the first job that McEntire turned down. She revealed in a February 2019 episode of Watch What Happens Live that she had been offered the role of Margaret “Molly” Brown in Titanic but could not do it because of a scheduling conflict. The part in the 1997 film ultimately went to Kathy Bates.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! Shelton, 44, is the only coach who has appeared on every season of The Voice, while other stars including his fiancée, Gwen Stefani, Christina Aguilera, Usher and Pharrell Williams have sporadically coached the series over the years. The current lineup consists of the “God’s Country” crooner, Stefani, 51, Kelly Clarkson and John Legend.Reba McEntire Confirms She Turned Down Offer to Coach The Voice Before Blake Shelton Signed OnAndy Cohen and Reba McEntire on ‘Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen.’ YouTubeShelton first revealed that producers originally had McEntire in mind for his spot while chatting with reporters at his Ole Red bar in Nashville in November 2019.“If I’m not mistaken, they wanted Reba to be a coach on The Voice first. They knew they wanted a country artist to be a coach on The Voice to fill that lane,” he said at the time, per Taste of Country. “For whatever reason, she couldn’t do it, or they just decided it wasn’t the thing for her at the time.”- Advertisement – The three-time Grammy winner confirmed that she was offered the spinning red chair that ultimately went to Blake Shelton ahead of the NBC singing competition’s 2011 premiere.“Blake was the perfect choice,” she said. “He’s done a wonderful job.”When Andy Cohen asked McEntire whether she regrets passing on the show now that it is a huge success in its 19th season, she responded with a laugh, “Oh, sure! I mean, after you see a very successful show that’s been running, what, 15 years? Uh, yeah! I’m like, ‘Shoot, I should’ve done that.’”- Advertisement – Reba McEntire has done just about everything in the four-plus-decades since she launched her career. She’s released 33 albums, acted on the big screen and Broadway, had her own sitcom and won countless awards. But when an opportunity arose to coach The Voice, the country superstar turned it down.“It is very true,” McEntire, 65, said on Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen on Tuesday, November 10, ahead of her cohosting gig at the 2020 CMA Awards. “It was a very popular show in Holland, I’m pretty sure, and I watched the tape, and I said, ‘No, I’m going to pass on that’ because I don’t think I could ever be able to tell somebody that they’re terrible or go find another job or hope you like your nighttime job. I couldn’t do that day in and day out. I just couldn’t do it, so I did pass on it.”Reba McEntire Confirms She Turned Down Offer to Coach The Voice Before Blake Shelton Signed OnReba McEntire and Blake Shelton. Matt Baron/Shutterstock; Trae Patton/NBC- Advertisement –last_img read more

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The Shunter swoops for Greatwood glory | Racing News

first_imgThe Shunter flew up the Cheltenham hill to run out an impressive winner of the Unibet Greatwood Hurdle.Racing from the bottom of the handicap, he relished the testing conditions as he quickened past top weight Ballyandy after the last.- Advertisement – Ridden confidently by Robbie Power, partnering his fourth winner of the Open meeting, it was a notable success for trainer Emmett Mullins.As ever there were plenty in with a chance approaching the last, but Ballyandy still held sway despite his welter burden, and he did well to hold off the favourite Tegerek for second. Hunters Call was fourth.The Shunter (13-2) only had a maiden hurdle win to his name over the smaller obstacles previously, but did triumph over fences at Punchestown in September.- Advertisement – Power admitted he had a tough few days to make the minimum weight.He added: “I’ve not eaten a whole pile. I’ve eaten a bit of chicken, but very little since Friday morning. I had breakfast Friday morning and a few bits of chicken and All-Bran for breakfast in the mornings, that’s all.“I’ve not had dinner the last two nights. I don’t like sweating as I’d rather starve than sweat. I did a small sweat this morning. I’m well hydrated as I’ve been drinking plenty of fluids.“The eating doesn’t bother me as it’s something I’ve grown up with. I’ve probably smoked more in the last couple of days than I ever have before.“Emmet has done a fantastic job with him. He was impressive over hurdles at Downpatrick and very impressive in a beginners’ chase at Punchestown. Emmet thought coming here off 10st, it was a good chance for him and when the heavens opened, it really played to his strengths.” Power said: “I’d say it’s the lightest I’ve done for 10 years. Emmet fancied him and the rain came. He is more of a two-and-a-half miler, but the rain came and it brought his stamina into it today.“I got badly outpaced down the hill and I couldn’t go with them – I had to sit and suffer. He winged the second last and I knew when I gave him a squeeze at the back of the second last, I had a big chance.“I needed a good jump at the last, but he has delivered for me. Once I met the rising ground, he galloped all the way up the hill. Having a light weight on that sort of ground makes a huge difference as well.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Gareth Southgate: England boss confirms he had coronavirus | Football News

first_imgYouri Tielemans’ deflected drive on 10 minutes got the hosts off to a fast start in Leuven and, after England passed up a couple of good opportunities to hit back immediately, Dries Mertens (23) clipped home a fine free-kick after a controversial foul was called against Declan Rice.England spent most of the remainder of the match on the front foot, with half-chances falling to Mason Mount, Jack Grealish and Harry Kane who, on his 50th appearance for his country, had seen an earlier header cleared off the line by Romelu Lukaku.Belgium 2-0 England – Nations League reportWhat is England’s best formation? Southgate, speaking after Sunday’s 2-0 defeat to Belgium in the Nations League, said he had fully recovered from the virus.“I did have the virus, I was fortunate enough not to have had it as seriously as so many people in our country,” said the England manager.“But it wasn’t pleasant or something you’d choose to have. Everything is fine now.”- Advertisement – 2:00 5:19 Highlights of the Nations League Group A2 match between Belgium and England preview image Jamie Redknapp and Ashley Cole analyse England’s selection and formation problems after their Nations League hopes were ended by Belgium – Advertisement – England players and staff are regularly tested for coronavirus and Southgate has reportedly returned numerous negative tests.Belgium end England’s Nations League hopesEngland’s hopes of making back-to-back Nations League finals are over after they fell to a 2-0 defeat away to world No 1 side Belgium.  Is 3-4-3 the answer for England? That was the question put to the England manager, his captain and the Sky Sports pundits after the team’s Nations League hopes were ended with a 2-0 defeat away to Belgium on Sunday.In the aftermath of the defeat, there was debate over whether England need a three-man defence, if their midfield personnel is suitable for the formation and what they need in attack to hit the net against the world’s best sides. England manager Gareth Southgate has confirmed he had coronavirus but says his symptoms were only mild.Reports emerged over the weekend that Southgate had privately battled with the disease last month, keeping the news of his positive test a secret from any of his England players.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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England Women 31-player training squad: Natasha Hunt, Ellena Perry could face France | Rugby Union News

first_imgEngland Women have announced a 31-player training squad ahead of Saturday’s clash against France, including Natasha Hunt and Ellena Perry.The Red Roses powered to a 33-10 win over France on Saturday after a dominant second-half display, moving to a No 1 world ranking.Simon Middleton’s side face France once again on Saturday – November 21 – at Twickenham stadium, with Gloucester-Hartpury duo Perry and Hunt named in the training squad along with Loughborough Lightning’s Abbie Brown.- Advertisement – England's Natasha Hunt has been included in the 31-player squad
England's Natasha Hunt has been included in the 31-player squad

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Biden’s Economic Plan for the Virus

first_img– Advertisement – Biden warns of fatal consequences as Trump stonewalls on the transition, and Whitmer faces more blowback over the restrictions in Michigan. It’s Tuesday, and this is your politics tip sheet. Sign up here to get On Politics in your inbox every weekday. Biden and Harris speaking about the economic recovery in Wilmington, Del., yesterday.Will Trump face federal prosecution?- Advertisement – Trump is already the subject of multiple investigations in New York stemming from his private business conduct: a criminal inquiry by the district attorney of Manhattan, and a civil investigation by the attorney general of New York State.Yet there could be more, as our reporter Jonathan Mahler writes in a new article for The Times Magazine that seeks to answer the question of just how legally vulnerable Trump will be once he leaves the White House. Potentially criminal activity has unfolded throughout Trump’s term, Jonathan writes, and the only way to hold him legally accountable for things he did as president would be through federal prosecution.Precedent points to leniency here: Gerald Ford pardoned Richard Nixon in 1974, citing a need for national healing. Biden’s old boss, Obama, declined to prosecute former George W. Bush administration officials for authorizing the unlawful torture of detainees. But Trump’s case feels different.- Advertisement – On Politics is also available as a newsletter. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox.Is there anything you think we’re missing? Anything you want to see more of? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at onpolitics@nytimes.com.center_img One of Trump’s lawyers argued in court last year that the president was immune from prosecution throughout his term in office.Could the president, an appeals court judge asked, shoot somebody on Fifth Avenue and get away with it, as he had talked on the campaign trail about doing? “That is correct,” the president’s lawyer, William Consovoy, replied.It was a bold claim — and one that few legal scholars have endorsed. But what about after Trump leaves office? What’s to stop him from being prosecuted then? “Every president seeks to exploit the immense power of the office, but Trump’s exploitation of this power represented a difference in both degree and kind,” Jonathan writes. “Trump stretched the limits of his authority not just to enrich himself and his family but to block investigations into his personal and official conduct and to maintain his grip on power.”Prosecuting a former president — especially one who just received the second-most popular votes in United States history, and who continues to command the support of a devoted following — would be a complicated and risky gambit. You can read the full article, or listen to a narrated audio version of it, at this link.New York Times EventsJoin DealBook for conversations with Anthony Fauci and Elizabeth Warren.Today DealBook is holding its first Online Summit. Join us at 11 a.m. Eastern for a conversation with Dr. Anthony Fauci as he discusses the latest developments in the pandemic and reflects on his service under six presidents. And at 4:30 p.m. Eastern, Senator Elizabeth Warren will discuss the postelection outlook for politics and policy.Watch free from anywhere in the world. Register now. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Second BSE case occurred in Texas, USDA says

first_img “The source herd is now under a hold order as we identify animals of interest within the herd,” USDA Chief Veterinarian John Clifford said in a prepared statement. Investigators will look for cattle born within a year before or after the BSE-infected cow and any of the cow’s offspring born within the past 2 years, he explained. The AP report said Champion Pet Food is under contract to take samples from animals in poor health. The company’s owner, Benjy Bauer, told the AP that his workers took samples from the cow and sent them to the Texas Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Texas A&M University. The lab is one of several the USDA uses to screen cattle for BSE, the story said. The USDA waited for the results of DNA tests before announcing that the infected cow came from Texas. The step was necessary because parts of the infected cow were stored with those of four other cattle, causing some uncertainty, officials said. “If the age of the animal cannot be pinpointed, then we may expand our inquiry to include all animals in this herd before the feed ban went into place in 1997,” Clifford said. To prevent BSE, the government banned putting cattle protein into cattle feed in August 1997. The FDA will also check whether firms that may have processed meat-and-bone meal from animals from that herd have complied with the 1997 feed ban, Dr. Steve Sundlof, director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, said at a news conference last night. Because of the cow’s age, the USDA suspects it became infected by eating contaminated feed before the government ban began in 1997. The USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will try to trace the source herd’s feed history, officials said. USDA press conference transcript The infected cow was incinerated, and no parts were used in human food or animal feed, according to the USDA. “The safety of our food supply is not in question,” Clifford stated.center_img See also: US Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials said the cow was to be processed at a pet food plant in Waco, Tex., when it was diverted for testing because it couldn’t walk. Officials didn’t name the plant or say exactly where the cow came from. But an Associated Press (AP) report today identified the plant as Champion Pet Food in Waco and said the cow was already dead when brought there last November. Jun 30, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The United States’ second case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was in a 12-year-old cow that came from a Texas herd and would have been made into pet food if it hadn’t been flagged for BSE testing, federal officials announced yesterday evening. An initial screening test on the Texas cow last November was inconclusive, and two confirmatory immunohistochemistry tests were negative. But early this month the USDA’s inspector general ordered a Western blot test, which came back positive. Further confirmatory tests at an international reference lab in Britain were also positive, prompting the USDA to announce the findings last week. The Texas case is the first US BSE case in a native-born animal; Clifford said the cow lived on one farm all its life. The previous US case, found in December 2003, involved a Canadian-born dairy cow in Washington state. “We felt that we had the correct herd; we wanted to identify that appropriately with DNA,” Clifford said at the news conference. Investigators analyzed DNA from the infected animal and then looked for relatives in the presumed source herd by analyzing DNA from members of the herd, he said. The investigation turned up two cattle that are related to the infected cow, he added.last_img read more

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Alabama cow positive for BSE

first_imgMar 13, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – An Alabama cow has tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced today.The nonambulatory animal was euthanized by a local private veterinarian; samples tested by means of rapid screening showed inconclusive results on Mar 10. Per current protocol, samples were then sent to the National Veterinary Laboratories in Ames, Iowa, for further testing. The carcass was buried on the farm and did not enter the animal or human food chains, Clifford said.A Western blot test showed positive results today. Results of an immunohistochemistry (IHC) test were not yet available but will be made public later in the week. If either the Western blot or IHC results are positive, the USDA considers the case confirmed.The animal’s exact age is not known, according to a USDA press release, but based on dentition, it was an older animal—”quite possibly upwards of 10 years of age,” Clifford said. An animal of that age would have been born prior to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) 1997 ban on feeding ruminants with feed containing ruminant protein. BSE is widely accepted as being passed from animal to animal through feed contaminated with such protein.The USDA is working with Alabama animal health officials to determine the cow’s birth cohort and to test any offspring. The epidemiologic investigation will also involve the FDA in determining the feed history of the cow.Clifford assured in his announcement that “We will continue to be very transparent in sharing information with the public and with our trading partners around the world.”The current BSE case is the third in a US cow. One of the previous two infected cattle was born in Canada; the origin of the current case is not yet known.See also:Mar 13 USDA press releaselast_img read more

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CDC expects plentiful, on-target flu vaccine

first_imgSep 24, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Public health and medical leaders predicted today that this year’s influenza vaccine will match up well with circulating flu viruses—unlike last year’s vaccine—and that plenty of doses will be available.”We are optimistic that this year’s vaccine will be on target in protecting against the flu,” said Dr. Daniel B. Jernigan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in a news release from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID).”Last year at this time we had an indication that the vaccine might not be as effective,” Jernigan said at a press conference held today to promote flu immunization as flu season approaches. “There is no such indication this time.”CDC Director Julie Gerberding added that, on the basis of flu strains circulating in the southern hemisphere, “Right now we’re at a point where we feel very confident.”Two of the three components in last year’s vaccine—A/H3N2 and B—didn’t match well with the circulating flu strains. A preliminary study from Wisconsin showed that the H3N2 component provided 58% protection against circulating H3N2 viruses, but the B component offered no protection.Vaccine abundanceAt the news briefing, officials from the CDC and several medical societies also predicted that plenty of vaccine will be available this season.”Vaccine is out there in abundance,” said William Schaffner, MD, president-elect of the NFID and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “We should continue to vaccinate through the fall and into winter and into the early part of next year.”A newsletter from the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, a coalition of numerous medical and health organizations, said last week that about 148 million doses, a record number, is expected to be available this season in the United States. About 35 million doses had been distributed as of Sep 5, the coalition said.Last spring, the CDC recommended for the first time that school-age children, from 5 through 18, should receive flu immunizations, which added about 30 million children to the groups included in vaccination recommendations. (Children from 6 through 59 months old were included in earlier recommendations.) In all, 261 million Americans are targeted in the CDC recommendations, the NFID said.The reason for immunizing school-age children is that they have higher flu rates than most groups and the virus spreads easily in schools, said Dr. Renee Jenkins, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. “And reducing the rate in children reduces the rate in the community at large,” she added.Officials said 86 children died of flu in the 2007-08 season.Under-immunized groupsImmunization coverage varies widely among the different flu-shot target groups, officials said today. The NFID said immunization rates last year were 66.7% for people 65 and older—well below federal targets—and 36.2% for those between 50 and 64. CDC data show that only 21.3% of children aged 6 through 23 months were fully vaccinated in the 2006-07 season, the NFID reported.A recent NFID consumer survey of 2,029 adults pointed up the need for healthcare providers to promote flu vaccination, officials said. Seventy percent said they would be very likely to get vaccinated if their provider recommended it. But nearly 4 in 10 respondents overall, and nearly 1 in 5 elderly people, reported they had never discussed flu vaccination with their provider. Of those who had talked about the subject, half said they had raised it themselves.More than 30% of Americans who receive Medicare do not receive flu shots, said Kerry Weems, acting director of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in the NFID release. Medicare covers both flu and pneumococcal vaccinations for all beneficiaries. Officials also urged all Americans 65 and older to get the pneumococcal vaccine, which guards against infections that cause pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis.Coverage in healthcare workersOfficials at the briefing also stressed the need to increase flu immunization coverage among healthcare workers, only 42% of whom were vaccinated in 2006.Gerberding expressed a personal view that it is “unconscionable” for a healthcare worker to avoid flu immunization unless he or she has a medical contraindication.”I would encourage healthcare facilities to measure their levels of vaccination and report them,” and patients should ask about the rates, she said.When a reporter asked if any healthcare facilities are requiring employees to be vaccinated, Schaffner said, “There are individual facilities that are moving in that direction. We’re hoping that they will document their activities and publish that so we can all benefit from those things.”Another question was whether experts have identified particular groups of people who are less likely to get flu shots. Schaffner replied, “It’s quite clear that African-Americans and Hispanics and others don’t avail themselves as of immunization as often as Caucasians do.”In response to another question, Gerberding declined to predict how bad the upcoming flu season will be. “As far as prognostication, I’ve learned the hard way never to predict anything about influenza,” she said.Schaffner offered a different answer: “I’ll predict something: There will be influenza, it will come, we’ll have an outbreak, there will be people ill, some will be hospitalized, and some will die.”See also: Sep 19 National Vaccine Summit newsletterhttp://www.preventinfluenza.org/summit_news_91908.pdflast_img read more

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